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Best Publichealth podcasts we could find (updated July 2020)
Best Publichealth podcasts we could find
Updated July 2020
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Vaping, dieting, seeing a chiropractor, taking omega-3 supplements… so many decisions to make, so much misinformation. Dr. Christopher Labos and Jonathan Jarry look at the body of evidence on these topics to tell you what’s solid, what’s iffy… and what’s crapola. The jingles, comedy, and bickering help the medicine go down.
 
These are the talks recorded live at the last SMACC in 2019. Coda 2020 is set to explode outside Critical Care, and include everyone in healthcare industry. Coming to Melbourne 28.09-02.10.2020, it is the festival of learning you cannot afford to miss. For more information go: codachange.org
 
A public health podcast produced by the National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases (NCCID), "Infectious Questions" connects those with infectious disease questions to those with the answers. Un balado sur la santé publique réalisé par le Centre de collaboration nationale des maladies infectieuses (CCNMI) et appelé « Infections en question » fait le lien entre les balados concernant les questions sur les maladies infectieuses et ceux qui offrent des réponses à ces questions.
 
Global Caveat is the podcast that explores the vast field of global health. Global health scientists Diana Klatt and Susanna Park discuss topics, such as research and fieldwork, with each other and guests to examine the connection between health and the sciences and how we have to work together for health, humanity, and the earth. Episodes are not endorsements for organizations discussed on the show. Music by Hawt Coco.
 
Healthy You explores the public health landscape and how it impacts your personal health and wellbeing. In each episode we tackle some of the most pressing health concerns of today. Whether you’re looking to start a career in public health, make a change in your life, or just learn something new, this podcast is for you.
 
ASTHO’s podcast series, the Public Health Review, features health officials and public health leadership who are on the front lines of state and territorial public health. The series capitalizes on current public health issues and delivers timely, thoughtful perspectives on the value of public health through the lens of state/territorial health officials and other subject matter experts.
 
How can we best communicate the risks and the evidence on the most pressing issues of the day – from genetics and nutrition, to climate change and immigration? David Spiegelhalter is joined by the world’s top experts to tackle urgent, practical challenges which affect us all.
 
Yes, there's actually a Vagina Museum. Located in London's Camden Market, the Vagina Museum is the world’s first bricks and mortar museum dedicated to vaginas, vulvas, and gynecological anatomy. We have a vision of a world where no one is ashamed of their bodies, everyone has bodily autonomy, and all of humanity works together to build a society that is free and equal. This is our podcast. Spoiler alert, it's about vaginas. In the first season of our podcast, you'll get six episodes that tak ...
 
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show series
 
Leading a governmental health department is a complex job during the best of times, but particularly so during a pandemic when leaders must navigate every step carefully. In this episode, our guests introduce and discuss a concept called ‘polarity thinking,’ which invites leaders to embrace situations or problems from the opposing perspectives, or …
 
Early in the pandemic, the National Institutes of Health launched a response against the new virus that has expanded to include basic and clinical research, and research into vaccines and treatments. Dr. Emily Erbelding, director of the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, talks with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about NIH’s role in supporting t…
 
Louisiana was hit early and hard by COVID-19 but, over the past three months, the statewide response has strengthened. Now, Louisiana health officials are using the lessons they learned from the outbreak’s early days to ensure that they are prepared to weather the surge in cases throughout the American South. Dr. Alexander Billioux, assistant secre…
 
Vaccine challenge trials, in which healthy volunteers are infected with a pathogen to determine whether a vaccine works, can be done faster and with fewer participants than traditional efficacy studies. But there are downsides: challenge trials require young, healthy participants which may not help produce a vaccine that would protect older populat…
 
On this episode, you’ll meet Jonathan Davis and hear about his journey into public health. You’ll also learn about the Inter Tribal Council of Arizona Tribal Epidemiology Center, which is just one of 12 partner Tribal Epidemiology Centers funded by the Indian Health Service’s Division of Epidemiology and Disease Prevention to assist in improving th…
 
Chicago public health legend and retired physician Linda Rae Murray, MD, discusses systemic racism and the pandemic’s disproportionate effect among African Americans and other people of color with JAMA Medical News Associate Managing Editor Jennifer Abbasi. Dr Murray is an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago School …
 
COVID-19 is causing disruptions in health services around the world and new data shows that 18 million children across 68 countries are at risk of not getting vaccinated. Dr. Chizoba Wonodi, the Nigeria Country Director for the International Vaccine Access Center, and Dr. Anita Shet, a pediatric disease specialist, talk with guest host Dr. Sara Ben…
 
COVID-19 hasn’t just changed the world — it’s transformed the way we live. On a national scale, it has upended politics and flattened our economy. On a human level, we’ve lost loved ones and livelihoods. But the pandemic has also led to unexpected changes for the better — it’s accelerated innovation, revealed new truths, and pushed us to find new w…
 
Why has the US had a harder time with the virus than Europe? Why does contact tracing seem to be working in some places but not others? Does it make sense to wear face coverings outside? Can COVID-19 be killed in the freezer? Can I get COVID-19 from a pool? What about in an elevator? Dr. Tom Inglesby of the Center for Health Security and Dr. Josh S…
 
COVID-19 has seen unprecedented harassment of state and local health officials. In a bonus episode, Dr. Georges Benjamin, executive director of the American Public Health Association, talks with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about the threats facing public health officials in the pandemic.By Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
 
Public health’s focus on the root causes of disease and injury mean the intersecting crises of COVID-19 and racism provide a critical opportunity for the field. Dr. Georges Benjamin, the executive director of the American Public Health Association, talks with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about the sector’s reckoning with reality around naming, defining, and…
 
This talk introduces the concept of a new generation of pulmonary embolism (PE). What was once considered a deadly disease process now carries a mortality rate of <3%, which may be driven by overtesting as well as overdiagnosis. This talk will explore this phenomenon and current evidence-based approaches to the evaluation and treatment of PEs. By L…
 
Amid the COIVD-19 global pandemic and social unrest, we are seeing people around the world be more sensitive and understanding to one another. Today we’re joined by Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and author of The Empathy Effect Helen Riess. As someone who studies and coaches empathy, she shares what role empat…
 
With vacations and camps upended, families with young children are struggling with making summer plans—especially when there’s often confusing or conflicting guidance. Biostatistician Dr. Elizabeth Stuart and epidemiologist Dr. Keri Althoff return to the podcast to talk with guest host Dr. Colleen Barry about their decision-making framework for ass…
 
I’ve noticed that many companies have been making public statements regarding systemic racism and bold promises of change. I’ve also noticed several public health organizations making similar statements, saying that racism is a public health crisis. This is the one that has captured my attention, and I’m going to explain why and then what I’d like …
 
The rapid pace of reopening the US without the public health capacity to contain the virus has Dr. Leana Wen worried. Wen talks with Stephanie Desmon about the current state of the pandemic, what we did and didn’t learn from the surge in New York, what individuals can do to reduce their risks, and what policy makers should be doing to prevent anoth…
 
Jonathan and Chris interview Dr. Elisabeth Bik, a science detective who has dedicated herself to identifying and reporting image duplications in the scientific literature that can be due to errors… or to fraud. This interview is part of a continuing series on bad science, including the special “Science Is a Human Enterprise” (part 1 and part 2) and…
 
Thanks to COVID-19, social media has never been more important — or more dangerous. Information — good or bad — spreads at lightning speed, including viral rumors, conspiracy theories, and “cures” that can kill. In fact, the spread of misinformation on social media has become such a threat to public health that it’s earned its own name: “infodemic.…
 
A year ago, the American Academy of Pediatrics released a landmark statement about the impact of racism on child and adolescent health. Dr. Maria Trent, the lead author of this statement, talks with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about the many ways that racism undermines health over a lifetime. Trent also discusses how to give pediatricians, teachers, parent…
 
En nuestra segunda entrevista con miembros de Centro SOL, Mónica Guerrero Vázquez, directora ejecutiva y una graduada de la escuela de salud pública de Johns Hopkins y Dra. Kathleen Page directora y médico infectóloga del hospital de Johns Hopkins, hablan sobre el virus que sigue afectando al mundo, incluyendo las noticias más recientes y lo que po…
 
Retractions of scientific papers happen for a number of reasons. The desperation driving COVID-19 research has brought this “nuclear option” of scientific correction to a much more public sphere. Dr. Ivan Oransky, who co-runs Retraction Watch, talks with Stephanie Desmon about what retractions typically mean—and don’t mean—and how COVID-19 may inci…
 
Can smartphones assist contact tracing, a public health tool critical to getting the pandemic under control? What’s known as “digital contact tracing” has been utilized in other countries, but there are privacy, policy, and equity issues to be worked out before a US launch. Bioethicist Dr. Jeffrey Kahn talks with Stephanie Desmon about the potentia…
 
Early in the US outbreak of COVID-19, New Orleans was struck hard. At one point, the city of about 400,000 people was seeing up to 450 cases diagnosed per day. Today, it has reduced cases 95% from that peak. Dr. Jennifer Avegno, director of the Health Department in New Orleans, said this is due in no small part to New Orleans’s history of disaster …
 
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