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Best Sherlockholmes podcasts we could find (updated July 2020)
Best Sherlockholmes podcasts we could find
Updated July 2020
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The Noir Factory Podcast is created for the mystery reader, noir movie goes, or true crime buff who wants a closer look into the genre. Mystery writer Steven Gomez looks at crime history, pulp stories, noir films, and the men and woman who made them. Each week we will examine an event or figure in crime history, a pulp or noir writer, or a piece of detective work, both fictional and in real life.
 
Welcome to The Baker Street Podcast. We love the incredibly popular BBC show Sherlock and the hit CBS show Elementary. Join Zachary and Rob as they talk about these two shows and all things Sherlock Holmes. This is a show for fans by fans. It's all about geeing out to Sherlock Holmes and Watson. Please rate us and subscribe to help more fans find our show. Learn more, contact us, and check out our other podcasts at www.southgatemediagroup.com.
 
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“I do not feel justified in doing it” [HOUN] In the last episode, we talked about the uncertainty of justice at the conclusion of some stories. Did the perpetrators find justice raining down on them? In some cases, it was left up to the reader's imagination. This episode we're looking at some instances of justice that may not have been in proportio…
 
“It’s every man’s business to see justice done” [CROO] Everyone likes a neat ending. The case is solved, the criminal is caught, and justice is served. But what about those Sherlock Holmes stories where the criminals escape? When the final action happens off-page or off-screen? There's not the same resolution there as when a Scotland Yard inspector…
 
“an historical curiosity” [MUSG] It's the third week of the month, which means it's our regular feature in Season 4: Mr. Sherlock Holmes the Theorist, the episode in which we investigate an old piece of Sherlockian scholarship and offer our commentary. This month, we feature "The Historicity of Sherlock Holmes" by Prof. Dirk J. Struik. Presented to…
 
“a highly sensational and flowery rendering” [SIXN] Flowers appear in a handful of spots in the Sherlock Holmes stories. More than the famous rose scene from "The Naval Treaty," they literally dot the countryside and color the scenery. From a flower that lent its name to one of the stories and a country house, to an obscure statesman, you may be su…
 
“the Colonel’s manner has been just a trifle cavalier” [SILV] Having spent the last episode discussing the unusual setting and Holmes and Watson's friendship as displayed in "The Reigate Squires," our minds turned toward their host, Colonel Hayter. Or rather, of his fellow ranking military officers in the Canon. In fact, we realized that in the She…
 
“the fellows are still at large” [REIG] In "The Reigate Squires," we find Sherlock Holmes ill and uprooted — staying in a country house — which, although it's a bachelor establishment, isn't quite what he's accustomed to. Although it may not be one of Holmes’s truly great cases, there is much to love in this story. Watson was right there to back up…
 
“Your hand stole towards your own old wound” [CARD] Watson returns from Afghanistan, recovering from a wound in the shoulder and the aftereffects of disease. But we later discover that he had a leg wound as well. Could it be the delirium that caused him to misstate his injuries? Or was there another reason for his error? Two old pieces of Sherlocki…
 
“the best and only final clue” [3STU] In "The Adventure of the Three Students," Holmes has a litany of clues at his disposal. From balls of doughy clay to a tear in the leather of a desk, and more. And yet, he's fixated on this one clue that he claimed was "the best and only final clue." What was it? And was it truly the definitive clue in the stor…
 
“my heart jumped so with joy” [STUD] We commonly see clients who come to Sherlock Holmes riddled with despair and grief. But if we look closely enough, we can also find happiness and sheer joy in the Canon. The Sherlock Holmes stories contain the full range of human emotion, from anger to relief and from anguish to jubilance. The more we looked for…
 
“helped a little to fill up the gap of loneliness and isolation” [MAZA] There are many tragic figures in the Sherlock Holmes stories, and more than a handful are lonely or isolated in some way. This is either features in their predicament or gives us a better understanding of their personality. As many of us may be entering a period of isolation or…
 
“Watson, the fair sex is your department” [SECO] There was a scandal in Sherlockian circles in the early 1940s. Author Rex Stout, BSI ("The Boscombe Valley Mystery"), creator of Nero Wolfe, after careful research, determined that Watson was a woman. He presented his facts in the Saturday Review of Literature and let them sit. They didn't sit well w…
 
“I made every disposition of my property before leaving England” [EMPT] After Holmes "died" at the Reichenbach Falls, wouldn't people have looked for a funeral or memorial service? Watson, in particular, would have expected to assist in such an arrangement. As next of kin, Mycroft would have been expected to handle it, but that would have put him i…
 
“he contracted some loathsome disease” [YELL] Dr. Watson was a general practitioner, and one "with very limited experience and mediocre qualifications," as Holmes blurted out in "The Dying Detective." It's the reason he called for a specialist in rare diseases. With global news being filled with talk of coronavirus, we thought it might be the perfe…
 
“work which will cut deep at the very foundations” [GOLD] "The Adventure of the Norwood Builder" first appeared in print in 1903 as part of The Return of Sherlock Holmes. It was the second story in the collection, after Sherlock Holmes was resurrected from what many thought was a watery grave. We can forgive the muddled minds of the time then, for …
 
“I saw the American stamp” [DANC] For all of his familiarity with American cities, American police forces, American language and attire, Sherlock Holmes may very well have been American. A number of scholars have taken up the argument, including Christopher Morley in his famous essay. Even President Franklin Roosevelt tried his hand at it. It's jus…
 
“the City and Suburban Bank, the Vegetarian Restaurant” [REDH] We have plenty of instances of animal flesh on the side-board, whether it's a couple of brace of grouse, Henry Baker's Christmas goose, or a joint of beef. There was one lone vegetarian restaurant mentioned in the Canon. It had a real-life inspiration. But what else do we know about veg…
 
“should not gossip about there being a black child in the neighborhood.” [YELL] Steve Dixie in "The Three Gables," Lucy Hebron in "The Yellow Face," and the unnamed mulatto in "Wisteria Lodge" are notable black people in the Canon. Actually, they're the only ones. What does this say about Arthur Conan Doyle's attitude and treatment toward them? We …
 
“I had only one confidant—my brother Mycroft.” [EMPT] Why did Mycroft put himself in harm's way for Sherlock Holmes when the latter faced his arch-nemesis Professor Moriarty? Mycroft put Sherlock up for a night, drove the brougham that took Watson to Waterloo, and kept the rooms up at 221B during the hiatus that ensued. But why didn't Moriarty go a…
 
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