show episodes
 
Overdue is a podcast about the books you've been meaning to read. Join Andrew and Craig each week as they tackle a new title from their backlog. Classic literature, obscure plays, goofy childen’s books: they'll read it all, one overdue book at a time.
 
What Should I Read Next? is the show for every reader who has ever finished a book and faced the problem of not knowing what to read next. Each week, Anne Bogel, of the blog Modern Mrs Darcy, interviews a reader about the books they love, the books they hate, and the books they're reading now. Then, she makes recommendations about what to read next. The real purpose of the show is to help YOU find your next read.
 
Entertaining, actionable advice on craft, productivity and creativity for writers in all genres, hosted by Jessica Lahey (freelancer, essayist and NYT best-selling author of "The Gift of Failure: How the Best Parents Learn to Let Go So Children Can Succeed", KJ Dell'Antonia (NYT contributor and former editor; her novel, The Chicken Sisters, debuts in June 2020, How to Be a Happier Parent is available now) and Sarina Bowen (USA today best-selling author of more than 30 romance novels).
 
The book club podcast where Dave Warneke has read the book so you don't have to. Each episode Dave tells two special guests all about a classic novel or play, and by the end of the show, both you and they can pretend you've read it. From Austen to Tolstoy, Shakespeare to Hemingway... Devour a classic in a single sitting.
 
Join writer Elizabeth Flux and comedian Ben McKenzie on their six(ish) year mission to read every Terry Pratchett novel – not just the Discworld ones – one a month, and discuss them with special guests, puns and footnotes! Episodes released on the 8th of each month (Australian time); check pratchatpodcast.com and the end of each episode for notice of the next book, and send in questions to us via Twitter or Facebook! The explicit tag represents a fairly average Australian level of coarse lan ...
 
A weekly podcast about books, writing, reading, and raccoons. Hosted by Mike Ingram and Tom McAllister, editors at Barrelhouse Magazine and authors of fiction and creative nonfiction. Winner of a 2015 Philadelphia Geek Award for Best Streaming Media Project. You don't need to read the books to enjoy the show!
 
Two lovers of the Cosmere explore the universe created by Brandon Sanderson with biweekly episodes discussing the intricacies of this literary masterpiece. Episodes begin with background information on the Cosmere itself and develop to be more specific regarding each world/novel. We discuss the crossovers, magic systems, and characters in great detail. For fans of Sanderson, literature, epic stories, magic, and sexy podcast hosts. #AllSpoilers
 
WritersCast is the voice of writers. Host David Wilk interviews authors of new and forthcoming fiction, poetry and non-fiction books, talking with them about their work as writers, the stories they tell, the subjects they write about and the books they write. Writers reveal the thoughts and ideas behind their writing, and talk about a wide variety of topics of interest to their readers.
 
Each week on Smart Podcast, Trashy Books, Sarah Wendell interviews authors, readers, reviewers, bloggers, publishing professionals, editors, and librarians about romance novels, which are among the most popular genres in fiction worldwide. Popular guests include: Ilona Andrews, Robin Bradford, NPR's Barrie Hardymon, Jaye Wells, and Rachel Aaron. Amanda, Carrie, Elyse, and RedHeadedGirl, the crew of reviewers at SB-TB.com, also make frequent appearances with maximum silliness. Frequent topics ...
 
This weekly podcast will be hosted by Torie Clarke with co-hosts David Aldridge, Jeanne McManus and Michael Kornheiser. Each week, they'll have entertaining interviews with authors, plus lively discussions about what they are reading, what they love and what they hate! This show will be many things, but boring won't be one of them!
 
Thought provoking, critical discussions about literature's most polarizing genre. Shelf Love is a podcast that lovingly digs deeper beneath the surface of the romance genre into the id, ego, and super ego of romance readers and writers, one romance at a time. Host Andrea Martucci is joined by romance experts like authors, critics, academics, and readers. We have fun taking romance novels seriously.
 
Christopher (@cdhermelin) and Drew (@drewsof) talk about reading, literature, publishing, and trying to make it through their never-dwindling stack of things to read. All with a themed drink in their hands. Recorded at the Damn Library in Brooklyn, NY. For show info, book lists, and drink recipes, visit somanydamnbooks.com
 
How do I write a book? How do I create compelling characters that readers will love? How do I build a believable world for my story? What does it even mean to write a story that works? Do you have any writing tips? These are just some of the big questions that developmental editor and book coach, Savannah Gilbo, digs into on the Fiction Writing Made Easy Podcast. Each week, Savannah shares actionable tools, tips, and strategies that will help you write, edit, and publish your book. So, wheth ...
 
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show series
 
In the first episode of my rebranded podcast, I finish developing the scene list for Act I of my novel. This involves a few alterations to my original idea, but that just comes with the territory of being a writer. For a transcript of this episode, go to TheWritersEverything.org/transcripts. To gain access to my exclusive upcoming bonus content, su…
 
EMMA BRODIE has worked in book publishing for a decade, most recently as an executive editor at Little, Brown’s Voracious imprint. Her debut novel SONGS IN URSA MAJOR is a transporting love story of music, stardom, heartbreak, and a gifted young singer-songwriter who must find her own voice. The book pulses with romantic longing and asks the questi…
 
On Heels in the Middle East (Pardes Publishing, 2020) is the first book of Ksenia Svetlova, an Israeli journalist of Russian origin who covered the Middle East extensively during the last two decades. Svetlova takes us on a journey to Hizbullah dominated parts of Beirut, refugee camps in Gaza, Qaddafi's Libya and the revolutionary squares of the Ar…
 
It is almost twenty years since contemporary art took a ‘participation turn’. Now, just about every museum or theatre company has a participation or engagement department. It is nothing short of orthodoxy that one of art’s core roles is to reach out to audiences beyond art institutions - and paradoxically it is often art institutions that mandate t…
 
Gospel music evolved in often surprising directions during the post-Civil Rights era. Claudrena N. Harold's in-depth look at late-century gospel, When Sunday Comes: Gospel Music in the Soul and Hip-Hop Eras (U Illinois Press, 2020), focuses on musicians like Yolanda Adams, Andraé Crouch, the Clark Sisters, Al Green, Take 6, and the Winans, and on t…
 
California is often used as a synecdoche for the United States itself - America in microcosm. Yet, California was, is, and will always be, Native space. This fact is forcefully argued by Damon Akins and William J. Bauer, Jr. in We Are the Land: A History of Native California (University of California Press, 2021). Akins, an associate professor hist…
 
How does the record industry work? In Getting Signed: Record Contracts, Musicians, and Power in Society (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020), David Arditi, Associate Professor in Sociology and Anthropology at University of Texas at Arlington, analyses the ideology of getting signed and getting a record contract to show the alienating and exploitative effects…
 
What is the future of the book? In Book Wars: The Digital Revolution in Publishing (Polity, 2021) John Thompson, Professor of Sociology at the University of Cambridge, examines the impact of digital technology on the publishing industry. The book grapples with broad questions of the changing nature of capitalism, the idea of information capital, an…
 
Boy On Fire: The Young Nick Cave (HarperCollins, 2020) is the first volume of a long-awaited, near-mythical biography of Nick Cave by award-winning writer, Mark Mordue. A beautiful, profound and poetic biography of the formative years of the dark prince of Australian rock 'n' roll, Boy on Fire is Nick Cave's creation story. This is a portrait of th…
 
Since the mid-nineteenth century, Americans have known the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York as a site of industrial production, a place to heal from disease, and a sprawling outdoor playground that must be preserved in its wild state. Less well known, however, has been the area's role in hosting a network of state and federal prisons. A Pri…
 
What insights on the human experience can we find in ancient Indian mythology? Join us as we speak to Dr. Brian Collins (Associate Professor, Chair Department of Classics and Religious Studies, Ohio University) about his work on Paraśu-Rāma, the brahmin who decapitates his own mother and annihilates 21 generations of the warriors. You can also list…
 
Kincraft: The Making of Black Evangelical Sociality (Duke University Press, 2021) by Todne Thomas takes a deep dive into the social and religious lives of two black evangelical churches in the Atlanta metro area. Thomas ethnographically renders the ways in which black evangelicals engage in a process of producing kin or crafting relatedness through…
 
Whether referring to a place, a nonhuman animal or plant, or a state of mind, wild indicates autonomy and agency, a unique expression of life. Yet two contrasting ideas about wild nature permeate contemporary discussions: either that nature is most wild in the absence of a defiling human presence, or that nature is completely humanized and nothing …
 
In Putting the Humanities PhD to Work: Thriving in and Beyond the Classroom (Duke University Press, 2020), Katina L. Rogers tackles three major issues in academia – post-PhD careers, academic labor practices, and inclusivity and equity. Rogers demonstrates how scholarly reward practices hide the realities of faculty work, value normative rather tha…
 
What is the future of the book? In Book Wars: The Digital Revolution in Publishing (Polity, 2021) John Thompson, Professor of Sociology at the University of Cambridge, examines the impact of digital technology on the publishing industry. The book grapples with broad questions of the changing nature of capitalism, the idea of information capital, an…
 
Why is there so much conflicting advice coming from indie-published authors? It’s because indie authors are as different as gymnasts, football players, and swimmers. Football players benefit from being big, while gymnasts benefit from being small. Increased lung capacity could help a football player, but for a swimmer, it’s vital. If a swimmer took…
 
Today’s guest, Irish-Canadian writer Anakana Schofield, joins us to talk about her latest novel Bina, winner of the Kerry Group Irish Novel of the Year. Bina was also shortlisted for the 2020 Goldsmith Prize, awarded to fiction that pushes the boundaries of form (in the spirit of Walter Benjamin who said “All great works of literature either dissol…
 
In this week's minisode we read some messages from the audience about Erin's thigh rub dilemma (0:21), briefly discuss our tentative plans to tackle Lisa Kleypas' Ravenels Series (8:03), watch the Virgin River Season 3 Trailer and react LIVE (9:40) and announce our next movie (18:01). Watch The Virgin River Trailer along with us! Press play on the …
 
We are joined today by CallMeNakomi from YouTube! Rand is juggling a dozen nations and allegiances, including Aes Sedai, when Cadsuane Melidrin casually waltzes in and upsets everyone. Rand is mad and angry, while Narishma is a perfect boy scout. News of Herid Fel’s untimely demise arrives. We develop an intriguing Cadsuane origin story hypothesis.…
 
Better Reading's Cheryl Akle and Jane Tara discuss their favourite new releases, their recent travels, and books from the Top 100 they've been listening to. Books mentioned: The Book Thief by Markus Zusak Seven Ancient Wonders by Matthew Reilly Fully Human by Steve Biddulph The Other Black Girl by Zakiya Dalila Harris Good Indian Daughter by Ruhi L…
 
Phoebe reads a chapter a day of Wilkie Collins’ The Woman in White. Read along. Our other shows are Criminal and This is Love. It’s the Radiotopia Spring Fundraiser! Your support helps foster independent, artist-owned podcasts and award-winning stories. Donate today at https://on.prx.org/3wl9pWn.By Criminal & Radiotopia
 
On this episode of Book Cheat, Dave has read Go Tell It On The Mountain. Hearing all about James Baldwin's landmark semi autobiographical novel is Sami Shah and Alex Ward. Support Book Cheat on Patreon: www.patreon.com/DoGoOnPod Suggest a book for Dave to cheat: https://goo.gl/jxMdiW To get in contact, email bookcheatpod@gmail.com or follow the sho…
 
“Unknowability“ Chatter goes random with Summer of Littles, iTunes review and Jeffrey Toobin (he’s back!). Award winning author Maggie Shipstead joins to talk about Great Circle, her third novel that spans a century, the globe and intertwined lives of two women separated by time and joined by life experiences. Great Circle entrances with prohibitio…
 
Today's guest loves discussing books just as much as she enjoys reading them. She's ready to swap spicy opinions and share book recommendations with her fellow readers, but she hasn't found those fellow readers just yet. Allison Matz prefers to be Twitter and Instagram-free even though she knows there are vibrant book communities online. Today she …
 
Listen to this interview of Brooke Rollins, Assistant Professor of English at Lehigh University. We talk about lots of Greeks and about one Frenchman and (if you write) also about you. Brooke Rollins : "I think there is a way that practice in reading and writing–––that it lines up so nicely with physical training. You know, to run a marathon, you d…
 
“Every bit of SEL”—or Social Emotional Learning, writes Jeffrey Benson—“you can integrate into your planning will not only begin to heal the wounds of passivity, racism, and inequity, but also give students an experience today, in your classroom, of that better world.” (157) The book, Improve Every Lesson Plan with SEL (ASCD, 2021), speaks to big i…
 
With thousands of migrants attempting the perilous maritime journey from North Africa to Europe each year, transnational migration is a defining feature of social life in the Mediterranean today. On the island of Sicily, where many migrants first arrive and ultimately remain, the contours of migrant reception and integration are frequently animated…
 
Why is the term "openly gay" so widely used but "openly straight" is not? What are the unspoken assumptions behind terms like "male nurse," "working mom," and "white trash"? Offering a revealing and provocative look at the word choices we make every day without even realizing it, Taken for Granted exposes the subtly encoded ways we talk about race,…
 
During the years of the Early Republic, prominent Native leaders regularly traveled to American cities--Albany, Boston, Charleston, Philadelphia, Montreal, Quebec, New York, and New Orleans--primarily on diplomatic or trade business, but also from curiosity and adventurousness. They were frequently referred to as "the Chiefs now in this city" durin…
 
Why did hundreds of thousands of Thai people rise up in opposition to elected governments in 2006, 2008 and 2013-14? What were the ideological underpinnings of the yellow shirt movement? How did the original People’s Alliance for Democracy differ from the later People’s Democratic Reform Committee? Were the yellow shirts simply trying to provoke mi…
 
I've had 18 years of formal education - why is writing so hard? Today's guests Dr Katherine Firth explains the disease's cure. The book Level Up Your Essays guides the reader through university essay writing, running through stages including essay plans, developing research strategies, writing with distinction, finishing strongly with editing, and …
 
Today I talked to Lee Zacharias about her new book What a Wonderful World this Could Be (Madville Publishing, 2021). Alex has always wanted a real family. Her father commits suicide, her mother has never noticed where she is, and at 15, she falls in love with a 27-year-old photographer. When she comes of age, she’s about to marry him, but someone e…
 
Listen to this interview of Brooke Rollins, Assistant Professor of English at Lehigh University. We talk about lots of Greeks and about one Frenchman and (if you write) also about you. Brooke Rollins : "I think there is a way that practice in reading and writing–––that it lines up so nicely with physical training. You know, to run a marathon, you d…
 
Listen to this interview of Brooke Rollins, Assistant Professor of English at Lehigh University. We talk about lots of Greeks and about one Frenchman and (if you write) also about you. Brooke Rollins : "I think there is a way that practice in reading and writing–––that it lines up so nicely with physical training. You know, to run a marathon, you d…
 
I've had 18 years of formal education - why is writing so hard? Today's guests Dr Katherine Firth explains the disease's cure. The book Level Up Your Essays guides the reader through university essay writing, running through stages including essay plans, developing research strategies, writing with distinction, finishing strongly with editing, and …
 
Today I talked to Lee Zacharias about her new book What a Wonderful World this Could Be (Madville Publishing, 2021). Alex has always wanted a real family. Her father commits suicide, her mother has never noticed where she is, and at 15, she falls in love with a 27-year-old photographer. When she comes of age, she’s about to marry him, but someone e…
 
This week on the podcast, Angela meets up IN PERSON with her friend Trent Preszler. He’s a winemaker, wooden boat builder, and author of the memoir Little and Often. Angie and Trent discuss what Trent learned about himself in the wake of his father’s passing, and how a beat up wooden toolbox changed his life. Little and Often is available now, and …
 
Javier Guerrero's "Narcosubmarines: Outlaw Innovation and Maritime Interdiction in the War on Drugs" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020) is about the encounters of Colombian drug smugglers and the Colombian Navy, both in the open seas and along coastlines. Guerrero specifically examines the technologies involved in the War on Drugs, such as the narcosubmari…
 
In an age characterized by rampant anti-intellectualism, Kathleen Fitzpatrick in her 'Generous Thinking: A Radical Approach to Saving the University' (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2021) charges the academy with thinking constructively rather than competitively, building new ideas rather than tearing old ones down. She urges us to rethink how we …
 
Between the decriminalization of contraception in 1969 and the introduction of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms in 1982, a landmark decade in the struggle for women's rights, public discourse about birth control and family planning was transformed. At the same time, a transnational conversation about the "population bomb" that threatened global f…
 
Many believe the solution to ongoing crises in the news industry — including profound financial instability and public distrust — is for journalists to improve connections to their audiences. Conversations about the proper relationship between the media and the public go back to Walter Lippmann and John Dewey and through the public journalism movem…
 
Emma Rothschild’s new book, An Infinite History: The Story of a Family in France over Three Centuries (Princeton University Press, 2021) (see the book’s accompanying website here: https://infinitehistory.org), is a beautiful work that, by following the lives of one obscure family over five generations, weaves together a history of France through th…
 
Constance Congdon's 2 Washington Square (Broadway Play Publishing, 2020) is a free-wheeling adaptation of Henry James' novel Washington Square set on the cusp of the 1960s as one era gives way to a startlingly different one. As always, Congdon's dialogue crackles with intensity and wit, echoing James' own razor-sharp observations of characters from…
 
Constance Congdon's 2 Washington Square (Broadway Play Publishing, 2020) is a free-wheeling adaptation of Henry James' novel Washington Square set on the cusp of the 1960s as one era gives way to a startlingly different one. As always, Congdon's dialogue crackles with intensity and wit, echoing James' own razor-sharp observations of characters from…
 
Constance Congdon's 2 Washington Square (Broadway Play Publishing, 2020) is a free-wheeling adaptation of Henry James' novel Washington Square set on the cusp of the 1960s as one era gives way to a startlingly different one. As always, Congdon's dialogue crackles with intensity and wit, echoing James' own razor-sharp observations of characters from…
 
You'll meet Sally Thorne, author of 'Second First Impressions'. Discover how to run an online writers' workshopping group. Plus, we have a cosy winter reading pack of 5 books to give away. Read the show notes Connect with Valerie, Allison and listeners in the podcast community on Facebook Visit WritersCentre.com.au | AllisonTait.com | ValerieKhoo.c…
 
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