show episodes
 
Yale Cancer Answers is a weekly radio show by Yale Cancer Center on WNPR - Connecticut Public Radio - providing the latest information on cancer screening, detection, treatment, and prevention. Hosted by Dr. Anees Chagpar from Yale Cancer Center, the show features a guest cancer specialist who will share the most recent advances in cancer therapy and respond to listeners questions. Recent show topics include breast cancer, lung cancer, melanoma, colorectal cancer, skin cancer, lymphoma, leuk ...
 
The Yale University Press Podcast is a series of in-depth conversations with experts and authors on a range of topics including politics, history, science, art, and more for those who are intellectually curious. Michael Hoak hosts with Jessica Holahan discussing all things art and architecture and occasional appearances by Yale University Press director John Donatich.
 
Professor Akhil Reed Amar, Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science at Yale University and one of the nation's leading authorities on the Constitution, offers weekly in-depth discussions on the most urgent and fascinating constitutional issues of our day. He is joined by co-host Andy Lipka and guests drawn from other top experts including Bob Woodward, Nina Totenberg, Neal Katyal, Lawrence Lessig, Michael Gerhardt, and many more.
 
You might think you know what it takes to lead a happier life… more money, a better job, or Instagram-worthy vacations. You’re dead wrong. Yale professor Dr. Laurie Santos has studied the science of happiness and found that many of us do the exact opposite of what will truly make our lives better. Based on the psychology course she teaches at Yale--the most popular class in the university’s 300-year history--Laurie will take you through the latest scientific research and share some surprisin ...
 
S@Y: Science at Yale aims to teach those within and outside of the Yale community about both the fundamentals of science and how research is used to unveil those basic truths. Through article presentation, discussion, and interviews, the show provides a multidimensional treatment of science that helps one to understand both new findings and the research behind them. Hosts: Sudhakar Nuti, Salvador Fernandez, Mario Felix Twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/ScienceAtYale Facebook: https://www.faceb ...
 
Yale Talk is a podcast hosted by Yale University President Peter Salovey. About once a month, he will share news from campus or host faculty, students, staff, or alumni for a conversation. Yale is a place of many voices—students, faculty, staff, and alumni who are bringing “light and truth” to our world in many different ways. Through this podcast, you can hear those voices, so you can learn more about the amazing work of education and scholarship taking place at Yale. You can subscribe to Y ...
 
How is global warming shaping our lives? And what can we do about it? We connect the dots, from fossil fuels to extreme weather, clean energy to public health, and more. Join Dr. Anthony Leiserowitz of Yale University for a daily 90-second podcast about climate change, where we confront reality and share inspiring stories of hope.
 
Expert insights on the science of mind, meditation, productivity, and mental health. Liam McClintock, the Founder of FitMind, talks with leaders in their fields, from neuroscientists and psychologists to Buddhist monks and professional athletes. At FitMind, we believe that the next great human frontier is the mind. FitMind combines ancient techniques with western psychology to provide mental fitness training that is taught at Fortune 500 companies, addiction centers, schools, government orga ...
 
The Yale Program in the History of the Book brings together scholars across disciplines to explore the materiality of the written word over time and across cultures. A collaboration between Yale’s Department of English and Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, it offers seminar meetings for the Yale community and a series of public lectures by speakers across the field of book history. We also host a symposium each fall.
 
The Old Wisdom New Era podcast explores the life-changing lessons that form us and give our lives meaning through both desperate and happy times. The conversations explore the experiences, and insights that lead us toward maturity. In our time, millions of Americans work to build a safer and more just country. This is also the most age segregated era in American history. Our culture lacks adequate forums for new generations to learn and interpret the wisdom previously passed through elders. ...
 
In the Club House, we hang out and hear the stories of amazing women all over the country... amazing not because they’re grabbing headlines or earning seven-figures, but because they’ve built lives that fulfill their own personal definitions of success...and the spunk and spark they bring to telling their stories is contagious.
 
Have you ever felt overwhelmed by the amount of Islamic resources available, thought the content was too advanced or been too busy to listen to hour-long lectures? Well, GenZMuslim is the best-new show made for busy Millennials that will digest Islamic knowledge into quick, 10-minute podcasts that are perfect for your morning and evening commutes. Created by two engineers who have been admitted into Harvard and Yale, been awarded “unofficially” Canada’s Strongest Man, and been both nationall ...
 
Are you a senior citizen? Or perhaps you have a parent, relative, close friend or neighbor who is one. If so, then you won’t want to miss this important and informative podcast. Learn about elder law, a relatively new area of law, that encompasses the legal issues that acutely affect seniors and their families. Yale Hauptman, an elder law attorney, discusses the various problems and issues of aging in America today and interviews guests from other elder care fields.
 
//The show will be a curration of discarded sounds and noises with experiments in the exploration of the ecology of the radio and sound// //Radio will be used both as the instrument of broadcast and as the instrument of composition// //Oral histories will also be broadcast along with old radio and commercial content to both simultaneously dislocate and recontextualized the experience of radio// //The goal of this show will not only consist of continual pleasure as many have dimonstrated the ...
 
Unseen Footage is hosted by David Armstrong, who watched all the best movies as a kid, and Claire Yale, who didn't. Each episode, David has Claire watch a movie and through her grownup-minded questions, attempts to convince her just how great the movie was and still is. Every month, a new movie, a new discussion!
 
About the Course This course is an introduction to game theory and strategic thinking. Ideas such as dominance, backward induction, Nash equilibrium, evolutionary stability, commitment, credibility, asymmetric information, adverse selection, and signaling are discussed and applied to games played in class and to examples drawn from economics, politics, the movies, and elsewhere. Course Structure This Yale College course, taught on campus twice per week for 75 minutes, was recorded for Open Y ...
 
At twenty-four, Clifford Beers, Yale graduate and son of an old New England family, was confined to a mental institution, where he experienced and saw terrible mistreatment of patients. Eight years later, after his time in another institution, he wrote A Mind That Found Itself, exposing the inhumane conditions of these institutions. Beers went on to found an outpatient center for mental health, the Clifford Beers Clinic, in 1913, and is considered the founder of the American Mental Hygiene M ...
 
Julie Chan, intuitive life purpose coach, Yale and MIT alum, and founder of Being My Purpose, talks with entrepreneurs, business executives, scientists, educators, and leaders to hear their stories of transformation, and examine the science behind them. She also explores what it means for anyone to unlock their potential in life and career, and to embark on a discovery of — All Possibilities.
 
A series of interviews from the Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology, focusing on people and organizations working at the confluence of religious and ecological perspectives. Interviews cover four main areas: 1) new and forthcoming publications, 2) engagement in practice, activism, and advocacy, 3) teaching and curriculum, and 4) perspectives from environmental humanities. Our Vision is a flourishing Earth community where religious and spiritual traditions join together for the shared wellbein ...
 
Lynn Singer was born with a special voice and an ear for spoken language. For over thirty years, she has helped people find their voice. She taught acting, speech and voice at Yale, NYU, The New School, Circle in the Square, The Actors and Directors Lab, the Gene Frankel Theater and at the T. Schreiber Studio in New York City.
 
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show series
 
A beautifully written exploration of religion's role in a secular, modern politics, by an accomplished scholar of critical theory, Migrants in the Profane: Critical Theory and the Question of Secularization (Yale University Press, 2020) takes its title from an intriguing remark by Theodor W. Adorno, in which he summarized the meaning of Walter Benj…
 
Emma Griffin's Bread Winner: An Intimate History of the Victorian Economy (Yale UP, 2020) offers a refreshingly different take on the age of national prosperity in Britain from the 19th to early 20th centuries. Drawing from a collection of autobiographical accounts from largely-working class families, Griffin captures the forgotten stories of ordin…
 
Rap Analytics talk about the new presidential administration and ask the questions that's on everybody's mind ... WHAT'S UP WITH THA STIMMY??! More Analyzing: Hip-hop News: Trump Pardons hip-hop | Dre back in the studio | Ross Bawse Moves | Griselda Movie Hip-hop Sports: NFL Payoffs | Kyrie contribution Follow Rap Analytics: Twitter • Instagram GET…
 
"Cooking is a declaration of love ... food is God’s love made delicious." Theologian Norman Wirzba reflects on the threats of our faulty logic of food and our disordered and disconnected relationship to eating and nourishment, and imagines a theology of food grounded in membership, gift, and hospitality. Interview with Matt Croasmun. Support For th…
 
In recognition of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, President Peter Salovey and Professor Phillip Atiba Goff discuss the science of racial bias, the work of the Center for Policing Equity, and the intersection of the COVID-19 pandemic and racial disparities.By Yale Talk: Conversations with President Peter Salovey
 
Musical Solidarities: Political Action and Music in Late Twentieth-Century Poland (Oxford University Press, 2020) by Andrea Bohlman is a study of the music of dissent and protest during the Solidarity Movement in 1980s Poland. This book is not simply a re-telling of significant events in the fight against state socialism or an examination of import…
 
Digital Religion does not simply refer to religion as it is carried out online, but more broadly studies how digital media interrelate with religious practice and belief. Xenia Zeiler's book Digital Humanism (Routledge, 2019) explores and consequentially studies how Hinduism is expressed in the digital sphere and how Hindus utilise digital media. H…
 
This is a Special Series on Third World Nationalism. In the wake of a rise in nationalism around the world, and its general condemnation by liberals and the left, in addition to the rise of China and Russia, we have put together this series on Third World Nationalism to nuance the present discourse on nationalism, note its centrality to anti-imperi…
 
In The Cow in the Elevator: An Anthropology of Wonder (Duke UP, 2018), Tulasi Srinivas explores a wonderful world where deities jump fences and priests ride in helicopters to present a joyful, imaginative, yet critical reading of modern religious life. Drawing on nearly two decades of fieldwork with priests, residents, and devotees, and her own exp…
 
Whether engaged in same-sex desire or gender nonconformity, black queer individuals live with being perceived as a threat while simultaneously being subjected to the threat of physical, psychological, and socioeconomic injury. Attending to and challenging threats has become a defining element in queer black artists’ work throughout the black diaspo…
 
A beautifully written exploration of religion's role in a secular, modern politics, by an accomplished scholar of critical theory, Migrants in the Profane: Critical Theory and the Question of Secularization (Yale University Press, 2020) takes its title from an intriguing remark by Theodor W. Adorno, in which he summarized the meaning of Walter Benj…
 
Digital Religion does not simply refer to religion as it is carried out online, but more broadly studies how digital media interrelate with religious practice and belief. Xenia Zeiler's book Digital Humanism (Routledge, 2019) explores and consequentially studies how Hinduism is expressed in the digital sphere and how Hindus utilise digital media. H…
 
In The Cow in the Elevator: An Anthropology of Wonder (Duke UP, 2018), Tulasi Srinivas explores a wonderful world where deities jump fences and priests ride in helicopters to present a joyful, imaginative, yet critical reading of modern religious life. Drawing on nearly two decades of fieldwork with priests, residents, and devotees, and her own exp…
 
Why are humans alone capable of invention? This question is relevant to every human invention, from music to mathematics, sculpture and science, dating back to the beginnings of civilization. In The Pattern Seekers: A New Theory of Human Invention, Simon Baron-Cohen, the director of the Autism Research Center at Cambridge University, presents a new…
 
Deborah Fuller, University of Washington School of Medicine Microbiology Professor, discusses the efficacy of Covid-19 vaccines on new strains. George Magnus, Oxford University China Centre Research Associate, says the new U.S. administration will bring a change in tone towards China but not of substance. Republican Congressman Bryan Steil of Wisco…
 
This episode of Spotlights features Susan Bratton, PhD, a Professor at Baylor University in the Department of Environmental Science. She talks about her work at the intersection of religion and environmental ethics, particularly in light of her exciting new book, Religion and the Environment: An Introduction, which provides a thorough and thoughtfu…
 
Emma Griffin's Bread Winner: An Intimate History of the Victorian Economy (Yale UP, 2020) offers a refreshingly different take on the age of national prosperity in Britain from the 19th to early 20th centuries. Drawing from a collection of autobiographical accounts from largely-working class families, Griffin captures the forgotten stories of ordin…
 
A reporter uncovers the secrets behind the scientific scam of the century. The news breaks first as a tale of fear and pity. Doctors at a London hospital claim a link between autism and a vaccine given to millions of children: MMR. Young parents are terrified. Immunization rates slump. And as a worldwide ‘anti-vax’ movement kicks off, old diseases …
 
In Scorched Earth: Environmental Warfare as a Crime Against Humanity and Nature (Princeton UP, 2021), Emmanuel Kreike offers a global history of environmental warfare and makes the case for why it should be a crime. The environmental infrastructure that sustains human societies has been a target and instrument of war for centuries, resulting in fam…
 
A reporter uncovers the secrets behind the scientific scam of the century. The news breaks first as a tale of fear and pity. Doctors at a London hospital claim a link between autism and a vaccine given to millions of children: MMR. Young parents are terrified. Immunization rates slump. And as a worldwide ‘anti-vax’ movement kicks off, old diseases …
 
In The Chinese Revolution on the Tibetan Frontier (Cornell University Press, 2020) Benno Weiner provides an in-depth study of what happened when the Chinese Revolution came to Amdo, a Tibetan region in the Sino-Tibetan borderland. Focusing primarily on the 1950s, Weiner demonstrates that the Chinese Communist Party wasn't just trying to build a sta…
 
What happens to everyday-life in a city when it becomes subsumed into an empire? Who becomes responsible for the everyday building and management of the new imperial enclave? How do local residents and colonial settlers manage to live side-by-side in new imperial arrangements? In Constructing Empire: The Japanese in Changchun, 1905-45 (University o…
 
On January 21, 2017, the day after Donald Trump’s presidential inauguration, hundreds of cities in the U.S. and across the globe organized Women’s Marches in response to Trump’s misogynistic comments and as a general rebuke of his election. In this collection edited by Dr. Rachelle (Riki) Salzman, established and emerging scholars contribute essays…
 
Emma Griffin's Bread Winner: An Intimate History of the Victorian Economy (Yale UP, 2020) offers a refreshingly different take on the age of national prosperity in Britain from the 19th to early 20th centuries. Drawing from a collection of autobiographical accounts from largely-working class families, Griffin captures the forgotten stories of ordin…
 
Ten years from the uprising in Egypt, Dr. Catherine E. Herrold, an associate professor at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy and a Faculty Affiliate of the Indiana University Paul H. O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs joins the New Books Network to discuss how local foundations navigate, in real time, a major…
 
For six years, anthropologist and artist Maya Stovall enacted a series of dance performances outside of liquor stores in the McDougall-Hunt neighborhood on Detroit’s east side. Stovall conceptualized these performances as prompts for people that may pass by and as a means to open up space for conversation with Detroit residents. These filmed perfor…
 
How do you hold a government accountable for crimes it refuses to acknowledge? Today's book, The International People's Tribunal for 1965 and the Indonesian Genocide (Routledge, 2019) emerges out of the International People's Tribunal for 1965. Rooted in a longer tradition of People's Tribunals, the IPT was an effort to remind civil society of the …
 
In Scorched Earth: Environmental Warfare as a Crime Against Humanity and Nature (Princeton UP, 2021), Emmanuel Kreike offers a global history of environmental warfare and makes the case for why it should be a crime. The environmental infrastructure that sustains human societies has been a target and instrument of war for centuries, resulting in fam…
 
Jason Rosenhouse's Games for Your Mind: The History and Future of Logic Puzzles (Princeton UP, 2020) is about a panoply of logic puzzles. You’ll find Mastermind and sudoku discussed early on, and then you’ll be hit with an incredible array of some of the most intriguing logic puzzles that have ever been devised. Some will be familiar to you, but so…
 
Moving more is great for your happiness - but many of us decide to exercise because we're unhappy with our bodies and long to change them. What should be fun and life-enhancing often becomes saturated with self-loathing. Jessamyn Stanley identified as a "fat and awkward weirdo", who shied away from exercise until she realised that it was her own bo…
 
The Men of the LEG discuss abuse and depression in men and what are the causes of them with in studio guest Garrick Lawton aka "Therapist G" Follow Therapist G on Instagram @awareness.creates.change Follow the league of Extraordinary Gentlemen: Dylan Yale | Marc El | TR | Josh Da Intern GET MORE of Yale RadioCast on ALL social Media Sites: Yale Rad…
 
Theodore Robert Bundy was one of the most vicious and prolific serial killers in American history. His hunting grounds were college campuses across the country. This week, Ivy League Murders interviews Bundy expert Kevin Sullivan, whose exhaustive research has unearthed new and horrible secrets.By Sarah Alcorn/Laura Rodrigues McDonald
 
Patrick Foye, MTA Chairman & CEO, says he's optimistic about receiving additional federal aid. Kathy Hochul, New York Lieutenant Governor, urges the federal government to increase vaccine supply. Mike Wilson, Morgan Stanley Chief U.S. Equity Strategist, says the next step in the recession playbook is a consolidation. Steve Eisman, Eisman Group Neub…
 
Decades before he wrote his epic work Paradise Lost, John Milton was an active republican and polemicist. How Milton came to espouse such radical views is just one of the key themes of Nicholas McDowell’s Poet of Revolution: The Making of John Milton (Princeton UP, 2020), the first book of a projected two-volume biography of the famous author. The …
 
On this episode, I interview Mario Telò, professor of Classics and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley, about his new book, Archive Feelings: A Theory of Greek Tragedy, recently published by The Ohio State University Press. In the text, Telò examines how contemporary theorizations of the archive (especially Derrida’s Ma…
 
Spain has for too long been considered peripheral to the human catastrophes of World War II and the Holocaust. This volume is the first broadly interdisciplinary, scholarly collection to situate Spain in a position of influence in the history and culture of the Second World War. Featuring essays by international experts in the fields of history, li…
 
Do you feel lost in the Anthropocene? Would you like a map to chart your way through our changing world? How about an atlas? Well, the Feral Atlas Collective has something that might help you out. In this episode Anna Tsing, an anthropologist from U.C. Santa Cruz, tells us about the Feral Atlas: The More-than-Human Anthropocene. Feral Atlas is one …
 
On today’s podcast, I am chatting with Dorothy Berry, Houghton Library's Digital Collections Program Manager. In it, we discuss why she became an archivist, what digital archivists do, and about the great project she created and is leading at Houghton: Slavery, Abolition, Emancipation, and Freedom: Primary Sources from Houghton Library. Dorothy Ber…
 
In his exciting and thorough book, The Golden Calf between Bible and Qur'an: Scripture, Polemic, and Exegesis from Late Antiquity to Islam (Oxford, 2020), Michael Pregill explores the biblical and Qur'anic episode of the golden calf as understood by various Jewish, Christian, and Muslim sources. The incident refers, of course, to when the Israelite…
 
In his exciting and thorough book, The Golden Calf between Bible and Qur'an: Scripture, Polemic, and Exegesis from Late Antiquity to Islam (Oxford, 2020), Michael Pregill explores the biblical and Qur'anic episode of the golden calf as understood by various Jewish, Christian, and Muslim sources. The incident refers, of course, to when the Israelite…
 
As a resurgent Poland emerged at the end of World War I, an eclectic group of Polish border guards, state officials, military settlers, teachers, academics, urban planners, and health workers descended upon Volhynia, an eastern borderland province that was home to Ukrainians, Poles, and Jews. Its aim was not simply to shore up state power in a plac…
 
We live in an age in which we are repeatedly reminded—by scientists, by the media, by popular culture—of the looming threat of mass extinction. We’re told that human activity is currently producing a sixth mass extinction, perhaps of even greater magnitude than the five previous geological catastrophes that drastically altered life on Earth. Indeed…
 
We live in an age in which we are repeatedly reminded—by scientists, by the media, by popular culture—of the looming threat of mass extinction. We’re told that human activity is currently producing a sixth mass extinction, perhaps of even greater magnitude than the five previous geological catastrophes that drastically altered life on Earth. Indeed…
 
Decades before he wrote his epic work Paradise Lost, John Milton was an active republican and polemicist. How Milton came to espouse such radical views is just one of the key themes of Nicholas McDowell’s Poet of Revolution: The Making of John Milton (Princeton UP, 2020), the first book of a projected two-volume biography of the famous author. The …
 
Acts of Repair: Justice, Truth, and the Politics of Memory in Argentina (Rutgers UP, 2020) explores how ordinary people grapple with political violence in Argentina, a nation home to survivors of multiple genocides and periods of violence, including the Holocaust, the political repression of the 1976-1983 dictatorship, and the 1994 AMIA bombing. De…
 
Reforms in Myanmar (formerly Burma) have eased restrictions on citizens' political activities. Yet for most Burmese, Ardeth Maung Thawnghmung shows in Everyday Economic Survival in Myanmar (U Wisconsin Press, 2019), eking out a living from day to day leaves little time for civic engagement. Citizens have coped with extreme hardship through great re…
 
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