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Best Yellow Fever podcasts we could find (updated July 2020)
Best Yellow Fever podcasts we could find
Updated July 2020
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Join Patrick, Frostie, Cam, Dave and Ella as they discuss Wellington Phoenix FC's plight in the Hyundai A-League, as well as everything in New Zealand football. Support us on Patreon and receive exclusive bonus discussions at https://www.patreon.com/phoenixcity.
 
Each week Smithy, Hard News, 2ndBest, and El Grapadura cover all things New Zealand Football, including the Wellington Phoenix in the A-League, Kiwis flying the flag overseas, our national teams, the ASB Premiership and local Wellington football. We've got your football fix. Be sure to visit us at www.yellowfever.co.nz
 
The Thomas Jefferson Hour features conversations with Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States, as portrayed by the award-winning humanities scholar and author, Clay Jenkinson. The weekly discussion features Mr. Jefferson’s views on events of his time, contemporary issues facing America and answers to questions submitted by his many listeners. To ask President Jefferson a question, visit our website at jeffersonhour.com
 
Kicked out of his parental home by his scheming young stepmother, a young country boy, Arthur Mervyn arrives in Philadelphia. Here he finds the city in the throes of a deadly yellow-fever epidemic. However, he finds a small job as a clerk and is determined to make his way in the world. He soon discovers that his employer is a con man and a murderer. One night, Arthur helps him dispose of a body in the river. While they're struggling with the corpse, the employer is swept away by the current. ...
 
Official SleepyCabin podcast! Talented and handsome content creators spend ~2 hours out of their otherwise busy and miserable week to discuss food, fun, and shooting babies in the face - all with a generous pinch of self-deprecating humor! sleepycabin.com
 
Live & uncensored from Inland Empire's Hemet California the #1 rated adult humour podcast with Riverside Countys most wanted stoner Uncle Dust . This show is an answer to the disease sweeping the world known as " politically correct " , support real ass comedy. Facts : 1. Hemet California is home of the brave & homeless methed out bike gangs . 2. Inland Empire has always sucked the dick of Los Angeles Hollywood satan pedo dicks and overall money hungry sell outs. 3. Ther is exactly 2 open mi ...
 
The plot of the show starts with Hornblower being a junior Royal Navy Captain in Napoleonic times. He was sent in Central America on a secret mission. There, he reminisces the times when he was still a seasick and hopeless midshipman. As the story goes on, Hornblower gains promotion regardless of the fact that he lacks the resources and influential connections.This is because he used his skills and daring character. After overcoming lots of obstacles set in different lands with different ton ...
 
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show series
 
Some combination of intuition and ancestral advising led Ras Ben to investigate the Yellow Fever Pandemic that hit Philadelphia in 1793, and how closely it rhymes with the times today. What he found was a microcosm of corruption and conspiracy that had yet to really be unearthed in the modern day, yet shares so many similarities when it comes to pl…
 
This week author and White House historian Lindsay M. Chervinsky discusses her new book, The Cabinet: George Washington and the Creation of an American Institution. The US Constitution never established a presidential cabinet—the delegates to the Constitutional Convention explicitly rejected the idea. The book explores why George Washington created…
 
Check out full show notes--including book lists on our website at historian.liveThis week we discuss Tom Almeroth-Williams’ book, City of Beasts—now out in a reasonably priced paperback—which looks at how people and animals worked together in 18th century London. We talk about cows, horses, the great geese herds of Christmastime, and why people in …
 
Angela J. Davis, professor of law at AU's Washington College of Law, is an expert in criminal law and procedure with a specific focus on prosecutorial power and racism in the criminal justice system. Davis previously served as director of the D.C. Public Defender Service, where she began as a staff attorney representing indigent juveniles and adult…
 
The sixteenth episode of The History of Now, a podcast from the Faculty of History at the University of Cambridge. Listen to Simon Szreter and Chris Clark discuss Fighting the Pox in 18th-Century London. Simon Szreter is Professor of History and Public Policy at the University of Cambridge Chris Clark is the Regius Professor of History at the Unive…
 
Today we're talking about a new documentary called The Medicine, which chronicles the entire journey of a true Amazonian ayahuasca retreat, with a level of detail I've yet to see anywhere else. The film follows former NFL safety, Kerry Rhodes, and actress, AnnaLyne McCord, as they both seek out shamanic healing for their own reasons.Having spent ma…
 
This week in an interesting debate match, Clay Jenkinson and Joseph Ellis argue over who is the “Indispensable Man” of the American Revolution. Ellis argues for George Washington, while Jenkinson says it has to be Jefferson. A very wise listener suggests that they are both wrong: it’s Benjamin Franklin. Find this episode, along with recommended rea…
 
For show notes, and information on supporting the show, check out our website at historian.liveThe Nestucca River has been home to salmon and salmon fishers for thousands of years. In this summer-vacation themed episode, I talk with Professor Joseph E Taylor about the 19th and 20th century history of this unique salmon fishery. Combining labor hist…
 
We know Jefferson and Franklin, but what about the other signers - John Hart, John Penn, William Williams, Richard Stockton, William Whipple, John Morgan, William Floyd, George Read and others. I released this series as its own podcast in 2012, some listeners may have listened to it. I have combined it into one volume.…
 
High political stakes, secret plots, Plug Uglies armed with sharp awls to help 'convince' voters... Baltimore in the 1850's was a fearsome place where politics and gangs were hard to separate. Yet it was the connecting stop for new Presidents and Union Soldiers getting to Washington D.C. We speak with Josh Mensch. Josh is the co-author with Brad Me…
 
Hey everyone! Linsey and Quinn are back with a two-part episode featuring a discussion with Dr. Erika Fant, clinical pharmacist, and Dr. Janice Zgibor, pharmacist and epidemiologist. We talk COVID, pharmacy, contact tracing, and more! (This episode was originally recorded a few weeks ago but we held off on posting it to allow others to focus on the…
 
AOA is a medical honors society that's supposed to separate top-tier medical students from the rest of the pack. It helps determine which doctors get the top jobs in the most competitive fields. The problem? There's implicit racism in the way it chooses members, and fixing it may be a massive challenge. Music: "Medicines" by The Taxpayers…
 
This week author and historian Joseph J. Ellis turns the tables as he interviews Clay Jenkinson about his new book, Repairing Jefferson's America: A Guide to Civility and Enlightened Citizenship. Clay responds that the question the book explores is what we can still gain from Jefferson in our time. Find this episode, along with recommended reading,…
 
Dr. Bramhall tells her tale in The Most Revolutionary Act: Memoir of an American Refugee which describes how FBI harassment led a 54 year old psychiatrist, single mother activist, to close her 25 year Seattle practice to begin a new life in New Zealand. It begins by describing the fifteen years of covert harassment she experienced when she used her…
 
This week author and historian Joseph J. Ellis and Thomas Jefferson Hour creator Clay S. Jenkinson extend their ongoing conversation about the Jefferson-Adams relationship. They discuss the views of the 2 men on the relationship between “the few and the many”. Jefferson says that this inequality has occurred throughout history, and asks what Americ…
 
In this episode I talk with Professor Brent Sirota about church history in the long 18th century. People have portrayed religion in the long 18th century as a little boring and staid. In the 17th century you had a civil war over religion in Britain. In the 19th century you had evangelicals, Darwin, and the Oxford Movement. But in the 18th century y…
 
OK, yes, this is an episode about medical research, but it's the sexiest medical research story you're ever going to hear. It's got scandal! It's got a detective! It's got a sentient robot equipped with anti-gravity technology! We'd type more here, but we have to assume you're already listening. Music: "Medicines" by The Taxpayers…
 
Gary Lachman is the author of twenty-one books on topics ranging from the evolution of consciousness to literary suicides, popular culture and the history of the occult. He has written a rock and roll memoir of the 1970s, biographies of Aleister Crowley, Rudolf Steiner, C. G. Jung, Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, Emanuel Swedenborg, P. D. Ouspensky, and…
 
This week on the Jefferson hour, a conversation with David Nicandri about his new book “Lewis and Clark Reframed: Examining Ties to Cook, Vancouver and McKenzie”, and the importance of reading not only the journals left, but also their “day books”. In writing the book, Nicandri speaks about his goal to not just get get into explorers shoes, but to …
 
Newark N.J. suffered a brutal and consuming riot, or rebellion, depending on how you see things, in the hot summer of 1967. Through the voices of history, we hear about those events, what caused it, and the musician who got caught up and became an unlikely spark. Caught off guard, police and National Guard and a scuffle became a war, some say outsi…
 
Steve and Nick meet up for a Covid Cuppa to discuss some of the latest science surrounding the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. This time we find out how small a big virus is. If you like TheScienceShed, the best thing you can do is share it on social media, and to follow us all on twitter, and please leave us a rating or review on iTunes!twitter @SteveTheChem…
 
If you received the typical, white-centric education, you probably associate the Black Panthers only with violence and political protest. This week on Sawbones, we talk about their work in medical research advocacy and creating public health programs that sought to make life better for all black and oppressed people. Music: "Medicines" by The Taxpa…
 
In this episode I talk with Stanford Professor Kathryn Olivarius about her research on Yellow Fever in antebellum New Orleans. Yellow Fever was bad. It killed around half of all the people who caught it. Why then did young immigrants to New Orleans seeking to make their fortune sometimes willingly infect themselves with the disease? Olivarius’ rese…
 
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