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Dollars & Sense

The Australia Institute

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Economic data can tell us a lot about what's happening the economy and society, but it's easy to get lost in data. Dollars and Sense dives into the latest economic figures to explain how they impact you and what they tell us about the state of the Australian economy, with host Greg Jericho, Chief Economist at the Australia Institute and the Centre for Future Work and popular columnist of Grogonomics with Guardian Australia.
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Welcome To My New Podcast Channel ,Well Let Me Tell You Inside The Wandering Mind Of Alice is about getting to know Me(Ebony) And The Wonderland Mind Of Alice Getting To Know Me Inside And Out Talking about Every And Anything Under The Sun Let's Talk Real Live Raw Uncut Let Me Get To Know What's In Your Wonderland Mind While I Invite My Listener To Step Into My Ebony's Daily Lifestyle ❤️And Trying To Keep Alice's Mind From WanderLand I'm Truly A Prisoner In My Own Wandering Mind Support this ...
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The Lucky Country

The Australia Institute

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The Lucky Country is an insider's outside view of Australia's most important political and economic debates. Hosted by The Australia Institute's Chief Economist Richard Denniss, The Lucky Country is a weekly podcast from Schwartz Media which applies common sense to complex issues.
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According to the Productivity Commission, wealth inequality declined during the COVID years due to boosted government support payments. And when those payments finished, predictably inequality went back up. The overwhelming majority of gains from economic growth since the GFC have gone to the wealthiest people. On this episode, Greg Jericho discuss…
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The pandemic and runaway inflation reversed more than a decade of progress on living standards in just two years – and it’s going to be a long wait for them to inch back, says Greg Jericho. What does the latest data reveal about Australian living standards? Why is there so much fearmongering about a wages breakout? And did the government hit the ma…
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Calling for a ‘short recession’ as an economist is like calling for a ‘small war’ knowing you’ll never be on the frontlines, says Greg Jericho. Inflation isn’t coming down as fast as many hoped, but it’s still heading in the right direction. Some economists are calling for recession, but that’s playing with fire, according to Greg Jericho. On this …
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Budgets are about choices – and successive governments have chosen to punish jobseekers, says Greg Jericho. JobSeeker unemployment payments are “seriously inadequate” according to the government’s Economic Inclusion Advisory Committee. But why has their value fallen so far behind the aged pension? And with budget night fast approaching, will the go…
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Annual inflation is on the way down, but rents remain high and many people’s higher education loans are growing, even after repayments, says Greg Jericho. The rising cost of university and record indexation is driving up student debt, putting a major burden on younger Australians. On this episode of Dollars & Sense, Greg explores what the governmen…
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The government is under fire for trying to ‘pick winners’, but green manufacturing could be the pony to get behind, says Greg Jericho. The Australian Government wants to create a future that’s ‘made in Australia’, but can it really compete with the likes of China and the United States? On this episode of Dollars & Sense, Greg explores whether the n…
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Greg Jericho discusses the decisions facing the Reserve Bank in coming months and a new report showing that rate rises hurt Australians more than anyone in the world. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) shows that Australians feel the pinch of interest rate rises more than people in any other advanced economy. On this episode, Greg explores the r…
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The budget balance usually steals the headlines on budget night, but it’s not that important, says Greg Jericho. With budget night a little over a month away, Greg tees off on Australia’s political obsession with budget deficits. He argues it’s not a good measure of the health of the economy or of who is a better ‘economic manager’ – and the foreca…
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Despite claims by some business groups and commentators, a modest wage increase for workers isn’t going to send inflation skyrocketing, says Greg Jericho. On this episode, Greg explains that wages should be rising faster than inflation and says claims a five per cent wage increase for the lowest paid Australians will lead to out-of-control prices a…
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Unemployment dropped in a big way in February, so is the Australian economy now out of the woods? On this episode, Greg Jericho discusses the link between unemployment and recessions, what message the data holds for the Reserve Bank and why Treasury should hold off on the party poppers – at least for now. Greg Jericho is Chief Economist at the Aust…
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Housing prices have risen so much in Australia that 2020 prices look almost reasonable. In fact, if the house price to income ratio were the same as it was in 2000, the average price would be nearly $400,000 less. Greg Jericho is Chief Economist at the Australia Institute and the Centre for Future Work and popular columnist of Grogonomics with Guar…
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Australia’s recent gross domestic product (GDP) figures show that the economy is weak and people are struggling to keep up. So what can the federal government – and the Reserve Bank – do to help? Greg Jericho is Chief Economist at the Australia Institute and the Centre for Future Work and popular columnist of Grogonomics with Guardian Australia. Ea…
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The gas industry likes to tell us it's vital to the Australian economy. But when people are paying more in GST for Taylor Swift merch than many companies are paying in company income tax per year, and the government collects more from HECS than the PRRT, you know something is seriously wrong. Greg Jericho is Chief Economist at the Australia Institu…
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Wages are up over the past year, for the first time since 2021! Which means your real wage has increased as well, but by a small amount. Also this week, the Bureau of Statistics looked at restraint clauses, or non-compete clauses. So what do they mean for workers, and the economy as a whole? Lower wages, funnily enough. Greg Jericho is Chief Econom…
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The Right to Disconnect is attracting criticism from business groups and others, saying it will reduce productivity. Well, it won't. And do they mean productivity, or profits? Also, how negative gearing and the capital gains tax discount delivered massive tax breaks to the rich at the expense of affordable housing for the rest of Australia. Greg Je…
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With Michele Bullock at the helm of the RBA, there's change in the air. But do the changes extend below surface level? Where do they think inflation is going, and what about those pesky interest rates? Join us as we dive into the latest monetary news. Greg Jericho is the Chief Economist at the Australia Institute and the Centre for Future Work and …
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The latest CPI figures show inflation has fallen, hopefully putting an end to interest rate rises for the moment. But does that mean the economy is healthy now, or is there more to it? Greg Jericho is Chief Economist at the Australia Institute and the Centre for Future Work and popular columnist of Grogonomics with Guardian Australia. In Dollars & …
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The (old) Stage 3 tax cuts are dead. Long live the (revised and much improved) Stage 3 tax cuts. Some may cry 'broken promises' but it's a bit hard to make an impact with that argument when the broken promise gives most people more money in their pocket. Greg Jericho is Chief Economist at the Australia Institute and the Centre for Future Work and p…
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It’s quite amazing how nothing – not a pandemic, not rising interest rates – seems to do much to dampen the housing market. Amazing, that is, unless you forget that the entire focus of political pressure over the past 40 years or so has been designed to keep house prices from falling, or even abating. Greg Jericho is Chief Economist at the Australi…
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Today Greg's taking a look at retail figures over the past month, and what they say about our spending habits. Also, how much stuff from the 1980s could you buy today? Greg Jericho is Chief Economist at the Australia Institute and the Centre for Future Work and popular columnist of Grogonomics with Guardian Australia. In Dollars & Sense, each week,…
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2023 was a big year in economics, with inflation and the cost of living crisis dominating the headlines. Greg is taking a look back at the year, and how the economy shaped our lives in 2023. Greg Jericho is Chief Economist at the Australia Institute and the Centre for Future Work and popular columnist of Grogonomics with Guardian Australia. In Doll…
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The Government has released the MYEFO, or Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook, or as we call it, Easter for economists. It's projecting a very small deficit of around $1 billion. But does that really matter? Greg Jericho is Chief Economist at the Australia Institute and the Centre for Future Work and popular columnist of Grogonomics with Guardian …
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GDP figures out this week show that while Australia is clinging to slight economic growth, under the surface a recession is already being seen. Greg Jericho is Chief Economist at the Australia Institute and the Centre for Future Work and popular columnist of Grogonomics with Guardian Australia. In Dollars & Sense, each week, Greg Jericho will dive …
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Last week Reserve Bank Governor Michelle Bullock told us to think twice about going to the dentist or the hairdresser, lest we contribute to inflation. Greg explains why, frankly, this is a load of Bullock. Greg Jericho is Chief Economist at the Australia Institute and the Centre for Future Work and popular columnist of Grogonomics with Guardian Au…
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In this episode Greg Jericho talks about gross state product, and why households are poorer even though the economy is growing. Greg Jericho is Chief Economist at the Australia Institute and the Centre for Future Work and popular columnist of Grogonomics with Guardian Australia. In Dollars & Sense, each week, Greg Jericho will dive into the latest …
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Economic data can tell us a lot about what's happening the economy and society, but it's easy to get lost in data. Introducing the Autralia Institute's brand new podcast, Dollars & Sense, with Greg Jericho, Chief Economist at the Australia Institute and the Centre for Future Work and popular columnist of Grogonomics with Guardian Australia. In Doll…
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Welcome To My New Podcast Channel The Wandering Mind Of Alice Would Like To Basically Introduce Myself Tell You A Couple Topics I Will Be Talking About :LOVE AND RELATIONSHIP ❤️BEAUTY AND HAIR 💄💇🧔Politics 📈📚📝FASHION 👗👔👞👠FOOD 🦀🍓🥩🍗🥗FINANCE AND CAREERS📝🏨💈💸💳--- Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/ebony-bennett/support…
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Schwartz Media's new daily podcast 7am launched a few weeks ago. Search for 7am in your favourite podcast app to subscribe and keep listening. Sacking Scott Morrison Before entering parliament, Scott Morrison ran Tourism Australia. He was sacked by the minister, but the details of what happened have never been made public. Karen Middleton on the cl…
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Schwartz Media's new daily podcast 7am launches today. Search for 7am in your favourite podcast app to subscribe and keep listening. Surprise: the status quo election Scott Morrison's surprise win last weekend was the status quo election no one saw coming. The vote was actually a repeat of 2010, and the country has been stuck on that divide ever si…
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Richard Dennis, host of The Lucky Country, introduces Schwartz Media's new podcast, 7am. Hosted by Elizabeth Kulas, 7am is a daily news show from the publisher of The Monthly and The Saturday Paper. Hear the country's best reporters, covering the news as it affects Australia. This is news with narrative, every weekday. Subscribe in your favourite p…
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For the final episode of season two of The Lucky Country, chief economist at The Australia Institute Richard Denniss and Canberra-based lobbyist Chris Fry chew the economic fat of the complex relationship between Australian citizens, their elected representatives and the policies that determine the winners and losers. News audio is courtesy of the …
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The public messaging regarding recent occurrences of the rape and murder of women has predominantly been that women need to try harder to stay safe in public. Is this the right message? This week, Richard Denniss talks to journalist Chris Kenny about the way violence against women is reported in the media, and Ebony Bennett, deputy director at The …
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Why do corporate investments and political interests so often take priority over the long-term viability of our common resources? Should more Australians be encouraged to vote to secure the nation's future, or is it okay to prioritise this generation's wants over the next generation's needs? This week, former Greens leader Bob Brown joins Richard D…
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Why do people embark on careers in politics, and what does the uncivilised behaviour we see on Question Time achieve? In this episode, former trade minister Craig Emerson joins Richard Denniss to discuss why democracy is the worst political system there is - except for all the others. News audio is courtesy of the ABC. Email us at: theluckycountry@…
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For decades, Australians have been told that they have no choice but to support free trade, but now it seems that even Coalition MPs support restricting the market for the export of live sheep. In this episode, Richard Denniss and Greens senator Sarah Hanson-Young discuss the realities of exporting live sheep and the politics of calls for the trade…
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Why does Australia spend so much time and money commemorating the wars we've fought in? And why do corporate sponsors' logos at the Australian War Memorial often overshadow the people and events being commemorated? In this episode, Richard Denniss and ANU historian Frank Bongiorno discuss why we remember war the way we do, and the level of investme…
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Does corruption occur in federal politics? How will we know, and, importantly, how will it be prosecuted, without a federal corruption watchdog? In this episode, Richard Denniss and former NSW premier and now federal senator Kristina Keneally discuss the NSW Independent Commission Against Corruption's impact on politicians' and public servants' beh…
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How do the cogs of government turn when preparing a federal budget? In this episode, The Lucky Country takes a behind-the-scenes look at the budget with former treasurer Wayne Swan. Swan and Richard Denniss discuss what is in the budget, and what decision-makers take into account when they decide who wins and who loses. News audio is courtesy of th…
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Does class exist in Australia? And if so, does it matter? In this episode, Richard Denniss and ANU political scientist Jill Sheppard discuss class in Australia, its impact on individuals' lives and its influence on politics. News audio is courtesy of the ABC. Email us at: theluckycountry@schwartzmedia.com.au See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy …
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Does wealth "trickle down"? Or does society benefit more when wealth "trickles up"? The Lucky Country's first episode of the year features Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz, who was recently awarded the 2018 Sydney Peace Prize for his work addressing global inequality. Stiglitz and Richard Denniss discuss what the Turnbull government's …
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What impact might a banking royal commission have on the economy, or a cut in corporate tax rates or the legalising of same-sex marriage? To answer these and other questions, Richard Denniss is joined by senior economist at the Australia Institute Matt Grudnoff. News audio courtesy of the ABC. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
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As the citizenship crisis plays out, the government is reaping the lack of trust that it itself has been sowing for years. Voters don't trust politicians because politicians have trained voters not to trust anybody. Throughout this series the issue of shame has come up again and again. To explore its effect on public debate and the economy, Richard…
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Politicians like to talk about the alleged value of mateship and sticking together and fairness, but many of those same politicians are quick to turn on vulnerable sections of the community the minute they think it will win them popular support. Luckily, we live in a country of laws where those in power are subject to checks and balances and accoun…
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It's easy to convince yourself, or be convinced by others, that the decisions we make as individuals or at a community level don't really matter when there are 7.5 billion other people on the planet and a global economy worth more than $100 trillion per year. But what if I told you there was no such thing as the "global economy"? We're often made t…
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Australians are some of the most indebted people in the world. But we have been told again and again that government borrowing is evidence of mismanagement. How can it be? Treasurer Scott Morrison talks about "good debt" and "bad debt", but what does this mean, and who gets to decide "good" and "bad"? Richard Denniss talks to Karen Middleton about …
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The politicians that rage against the greed of the unemployed are often the same ones who preach about the importance of keeping families together. But despite all the talk, we have designed a welfare system that does little to help the hundreds of thousands of families families that are hit by job loss each year. In this episode Dr Jim Stanford de…
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The right wing of Australian politics is becoming increasingly confused about what they are for and what they want. While they talk about the importance of letting individuals make their own decisions, they rage against the idea that adults should be able to decide who they want to marry. This week Richard Denniss looks at the opportunities arising…
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