show episodes
 
In a time of populist politics with the rise of Trump and Brexit and disruptions to old media, this new La Trobe University podcast series explores themes of crisis in communication. In this six part series we look at problems for democracies around leadership and language, political polarisation, populism, resistance and silence of minority groups. We begin with a special lecture from New York political scientist Professor Stanley Feldman from Stony Brook University talking about the rise o ...
  continue reading
 
The podcasting of a life, by Matt Smith. “Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show.” - Charles Dickens.
  continue reading
 
T
The Ottoman Empire

1
The Ottoman Empire

Assoc Professor Adrian Jones

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
The Ottoman empire began modestly in the late fourteenth century and soon grew to become a formidable world power, lasting for centuries until its decline and collapse in 1923. This subject will examine the cultural, architectural and political history of the Ottoman Empire from, spanning its history from the fourteenth century to the First World War.
  continue reading
 
In this subject, students study current theories of literature, with a focus on genres relating to children's literature as a form of social practice. Topics covered include critical analysis, traditional story forms, modernist and postmodern picture books, emerging formats, fantasy and realistic fiction, non-fiction and poetry.
  continue reading
 
Anthropologists study human culture and society. They ask “what it is to be human?”. Anthropologists answer this question by analysing diverse societies to find out what all humans have in common. To undertake this study, anthropologists have a ‘kit’ full of conceptual tools. Join the Audible Anthropologist (aka La Trobe University’s Nicholas Herriman) as we describe some of these tools and put them to use.
  continue reading
 
In this subject students are introduced to China. The lectures are tied together by several common themes, including China’s incredible geographic, ethnic and cultural diversity, it’s dual exceptionalist and wounded nationalism, and the Deng Xiaoping-era social bargain between the Communist Party and the Chinese people based on improving living standards in exchange for acquiescence to one-party rule.
  continue reading
 
A
Australian Environmental History

1
Australian Environmental History

Professor Richard Broome and Professor Katie Holmes

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Just two centuries after European settlement, the human impact on the land, massive species extinction, and climate change, pose serious threats to the continent's fragile ecology. Students will consider Australia's early geological history; Indigenous land use; the competing ideas of land and land use among early settlers; and how various forms of land use shaped, and changed the environment.
  continue reading
 
The aim of this subject is to identify the constraints and opportunities that will affect the ability of sports to survive in an increasingly competitive, global marketplace. Particular emphasis will be placed on examinations of both North American and European professional sports, as well as indigenous games, such as Australian Rules football. Topics covered will include: labour markets in various sports, including the effectiveness of regulations such as player drafts and salary caps; the ...
  continue reading
 
This subject explores Ancient Roman epic poetry, the literary genre which deals with grand mythical narratives involving heroes, gods, war, and love affairs. Epic was the most prestigious literary form in the ancient world. Roman poets adapted and developed Greek epic, particularly influenced by the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey. Roman epics similarly deal with divine and heroic material, but Roman poets also weave contemporary and topical themes into the mythical subject matter. The primary tex ...
  continue reading
 
This subject deals with the cultural history of the ancient Greek world through both textual sources and the material evidence of art and archaeology. The period covered runs from the Iron Age world of Archaic Greece through to the late Classical period (roughly from the 8th century to the 4th century BCE). We will concentrate mainly on Athens and mainland Greece, but we will also focus on the Greek expansion into other parts of the Mediterranean world (Sicily and South Italy) in the process ...
  continue reading
 
The Roman World introduces students to the society, literature and art of ancient Rome, through a study of its major historical and literary figures, such as Julius Caesar, Augustus, Nero, Virgil and Ovid. We shall look at Rome’s place in the ancient Mediterranean world, and its connections with ancient Greece and other cultures, such as Egypt and Gaul. Through almost constant warfare, Rome accumulated an enormous Mediterranean empire, and this subject will investigate how this shaped Roman ...
  continue reading
 
Loading …
show series
 
Japan has always had a tense relationship with China, but now due to both their geographic proximity and their close alliance with western countries, this tension is taking on new dimensions. Guest: Professor Chisako Masuo (Graduate School of Social and Cultural Studies, Kyushu University) Recorded 18 April, 2023.…
  continue reading
 
While much of the Roman Empire was lost during the rule of Gallienus, We don't really know how much of that is his fault, or really get a sense of his reign. Was he responsible for the loss of territory, or was he just a victim of the time? Part IV of 'Gallienus' Guest: Associate Professor Caillan Davenport (Head of the Centre for Classical Studies…
  continue reading
 
Japan and Russia are geographically close, but have always had an uneasy relationship. Territorial disputes, strained diplomacy, and an unsigned war era peace treaty has amounted to strained bilateral ties, with little sign of easing. Guest: Professor James Brown (Politics, Temple University). Recorded 20 April, 2023.…
  continue reading
 
Emerging leaders from Australia, Japan, India and the United States discuss key issues facing the 'Quad', and puts forward a strong case for the Quad working together on non-traditional security issues across the Indo-Pacific region. The next generation of Quad leaders view enhancing resilience against grey zone challenges, geoeconomics, outer spac…
  continue reading
 
What does it look like for Australia and Southeast Asia to develop a joint agenda for maritime security? Join La Trobe Asia, consortium lead for the Blue Security program, to launch the first paper in a series on Maritime Security in Southeast Asia. Blue Security is a collaboration between La Trobe Asia, Griffith Asia Institute (GAI), University of…
  continue reading
 
As the Roman empire lost the western provinces something very different was happening in the east. Odaenathus remained on the side of Rome, but assumed the title of King, building his influence throughout the region, to the point where it became a problem for Gallienus. Part III of 'Gallienus' Guest: Associate Professor Caillan Davenport (Head of t…
  continue reading
 
The message conveyed by global media can be a powerful one, useful in influencing public perception and shaping politics, local media and information environments. Controlling the media narrative, usually through influence or your own state-run outlets, is of great interest to China. The superpower is actively seeking to insert itself into many oth…
  continue reading
 
Join Ben Habib in this episode of the Edge Dwellers Café Podcast as he sits down with environmental scientist and sustainability expert Dr Alison Mitchell to discuss the pressing question: "What is sustainability asking of us?" We discuss Ali's personal journey from environmental science to education for sustainability, exploring a wide range of to…
  continue reading
 
A recent UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report found global sea levels have been rising at an accelerated rate. For the small island nations of the Asia Pacific this is sobering news, but even for larger nations, lets take Indonesia, there are significant consequences. As an archipelagic state with more than 17,000 islands stre…
  continue reading
 
A challenge to the imperial authority was hardly unusual in the third century, but for whatever reason, Postumus decides to do things differently. Rather than marching an army on Rome he shaves off the western provinces, declaring Gaul, Germania, Hispania and Britannia the independent, but still very Roman, Gallic Empire. Part II of 'Gallienus' Gue…
  continue reading
 
There are around 170 Indigenous languages spoken in the Philippines, as well as speakers of English, Spanish and several Chinese languages. Most people are multilingual, with more than 90 percent of the population speaking one or more language. Guest: Professor Tuting Hernandez (Department of Linguistics, University of the Philippines) Recorded on …
  continue reading
 
Australia’s relationships in and with Asia and the Pacific is a perennial feature of debates about its foreign and defence policy and how it projects its sense of identity on the world stage. In recent years Australia’s interaction with major powers have become much more complex. As Australia reconceptualises future directions in dealing with allie…
  continue reading
 
When the Emperor Valerian was captured by the enemy what the empire needed was a trusted, capable, firm set of hands to take on the imperial mantle. In retrospect, that probably wasn’t his son Gallienus. For the next eight years Gallienus would rule as sole emperor and proceed to lose two thirds of the empire, leaving Rome at its weakest position i…
  continue reading
 
What pressures will the Russian invasion of Ukraine put on Asia? How will China recover post-covid? Will the Quad and AUKUS change power dynamics in the region? To celebrate the 200th episode of Asia Rising, a special recording to discuss the news, views and general happenings of Asian states and societies in 2023. Guests: Professor Nick Bisley (De…
  continue reading
 
Cleopatra Selene was the daughter of Cleopatra and Mark Antony, and was destined for greatness. Following the death of her parents she became a prisoner of Rome, survived into adulthood, and became a queen of the ancient world. Dr Draycott is the author of ''Cleopatra’s Daughter: Egyptian Princess, Roman Prisoner, African Queen'. Guest: Dr Jane Dra…
  continue reading
 
The Gardens by the Bay are an iconic feature of Singapore, where they dominate every tourist photograph with their towering tree-like structures. Now celebrating their tenth year, they're an emblem of the success of the greening of the city. Guest: Felix Loh (Chief Executive Officer, Gardens by the Bay) Recorded on 28 November 2022.…
  continue reading
 
Indonesia has passed a new criminal code, amongst which are a raft of controversial new morality laws and speech restrictions, including banning sex outside of marriage, insulting the president, and expressing any view that runs counter to state ideology. There are important implications for democratic freedoms in Indonesia, and human rights concer…
  continue reading
 
Xi Jinping has secured a historic third term as general secretary with unmatched political authority. This has given China a new drive to retain its position as a global superpower, and a desire to restore what Xi believes is China’s natural position of leadership in the world. As China attempts to reassert itself after harsh covid-19 lock-downs, w…
  continue reading
 
Part of the making of Octavian was the victories he had early in his career. He defeated his rivals, conquered territory, and united the senate behind him whether they liked it or not. One of those territories was Illyria, in which he conducted campaigns during the quiet years before his final battles against Egypt and Antony. It’s perhaps in Illyr…
  continue reading
 
Singapore is a small country, highly reliant on commerce and trade, and with strong ties to China. This relationship can be at odds with other practices, for example: Its small military has an active conscription system. All citizens need to serve at least two years in the military, and their training bases are in Taiwan. Guest: Associate Professor…
  continue reading
 
In 2022 The Philippines elected a new president, Ferdinand Marcos Jr, and with him came a pivot in international views, particularly towards China and the United States. The previous administration led by Rodrigo Duterte had embraced China and the development opportunities it had to offer, and while Marcos Jr might continue this, it might be with s…
  continue reading
 
Egypt was a valuable province to Rome, with natural wealth and successful agriculture. Thanks to an arid climate there’s also a number of preserved papyri from that era, providing modern scholarship with an invaluable paper-trail on the administration at the time. One papyri has led to the belief that Augustus confiscated lands of the Egyptian temp…
  continue reading
 
When Rodrigo Duterte was elected to the office of president in 2016 one of his main election promises was to clean up the drug trade. And he was quite open about how he was going to do it. The language he used was provocative and ruthless – those involved in the drug trade would be dealt with, using as much force as necessary. For those working in …
  continue reading
 
With Octavian triumphant at the Battle of Actium the scene is finally set for a dramatic showdown in Alexandria. Cleopatra and Antony, a couple famous for their strategy and volatility will pay the ultimate price for resisting Rome, leaving Octavian free to assume a role of undisputed power. Guest: Dr Rhiannon Evans (Associate Professor in Classics…
  continue reading
 
As tensions in the Indo-Pacific increase and new security issues emerge, Australia, the United States, India and Japan have come together with the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue to support the Indo-Pacific. The event will explored the key issues and challenges of the Quad, and the role of each state in emerging security issues Indo-Pacific. This e…
  continue reading
 
In this solo episode of the Edge Dwellers Café Podcast, Ben Habib maps out five broad potential scenarios for the future of the Kim regime in North Korea—(1) state failure and collapse; (2) managed systemic reform; (3) popular uprising and revolution; (4) coup d'état; and (5) externally-imposed regime change—critically evaluating the logic and prob…
  continue reading
 
India is a country rich in food variety and tastes, but access to food has changed, bringing options of western foods of differing nutritional value. With changes in diet comes a change to health, and wider implications on the health system of the country. Guests: Dr Sabrina Gupta (Department of public health, La Trobe University) Dr Jency Thomas (…
  continue reading
 
In 31 BCE one of the largest naval battles in the ancient world took place—more than 600 ships, almost 200,000 men, and one woman. The forces of Octavian, Antony and Cleopatra would square off for control of the mediterranean, and ultimately the Roman empire. Guest: Barry Strauss (Bryce and Edith M. Bowmar Professor in Humanistic Studies at Cornell…
  continue reading
 
The United Nations has declared 2022 the start of the International Decade of Indigenous Languages, aiming to raise awareness of the ongoing global loss of Indigenous languages. Ongoing attacks on human rights defenders and restrictions on civil society are critically challenging the effectiveness of these efforts. Read Indigenous Language Rights a…
  continue reading
 
When Cleopatra and Antony stood side by side they were at the pinnacle of power. Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator was the queen of an ancient civilisation, and heir to the unmatched cultural achievements of Greece. Marcus Antonius of Rome contended for control of the empire. Together they fought against Octavian and would bring about the end of the re…
  continue reading
 
Approximately 7,000 languages are signed or spoken in the world today, more than half of them by Indigenous people. These languages are critical to services like education and healthcare, and their neglect threatens the health and wellbeing of Indigenous people. Language is literally a matter of life and death. The United Nations has declared 2022 …
  continue reading
 
Sextus Pompeius was the youngest son of Pompey the Great, and was responsible for leading the last great resistance of the Roman republic against Octavian and Mark Antony. While he made the most of his late father’s reputation, Sextus was a leader in his own right, and to many a forgotten aspect of this period of Roman history. Guest: Dr Kathryn We…
  continue reading
 
Octavia was, in many ways, the very model of a modern Roman matron. As the older sister to Octavian, later Augustus, and a wife of the powerful figure Antony, she was respected and admired by her contemporaries for her loyalty, nobility and humanity, as well as for maintaining traditional Roman feminine virtues. Guest: Dr Rhiannon Evans (Associate …
  continue reading
 
With China mostly closed to international journalists accurate reporting is a challenging prospect, putting those engaged in it in danger from the Chinese government and their supporters. Guest: Vicky Xu (Journalist and Author, lead researcher of Uyghurs for Sale) Recorded 17 August 2022.By La Trobe Asia
  continue reading
 
With Antony distracted with developments in the east, Fulvia finds herself in the familiar position of advocating for her husband’s interests. This escalated to a war with Octavian, the outcome of which would leave Fulvia isolated. Guest: Dr Rhiannon Evans (Associate Professor in Classics and Ancient History at La Trobe University). Content warning…
  continue reading
 
Angkor is an archaeological site in northern Cambodia, and was home to the impressive capitals of the Khmer Empire between the 9th and 15th centuries. It is one of the most important archaeological sites in Southeast Asia, and an ongoing project aims to recreate it virtually. Find out more about the Virtual Angkor project. Guest: Dr Bernard Keo (Ar…
  continue reading
 
Fulvia came from a Roman noble family and is strongly associated with a string of influential husbands, most notably Mark Antony. She was influential and powerful in her own way, and would go on to play an important role in the Perusine War against Octavian. Guest: Dr Rhiannon Evans (Associate Professor in Classics and Ancient History at La Trobe U…
  continue reading
 
The track record of human rights in China is of global concern, with allegations of religious and ethnic repression, lack of freedom of information and civil liberties, violations of gender rights, and detainment of those who would speak out against the Chinese Communist Party. While the Chinese government is focused on maintaining ‘social stabilit…
  continue reading
 
What are the broad strategic trends and security challenges affecting the Asian region, now and into the future? Guests: Dr Elizabeth Buchanan (Head of Research, Royal Australian Navy, Seapower Centre) Professor Peter Dean (Director of Foreign Policy and Defence, United States Studies Centre) Host: Assoc. Professor Bec Strating (Director, La Trobe …
  continue reading
 
In recent years, as the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has grown in economic size, military strength and international influence, it has become more active in Antarctica. This has led to worries that Beijing’s ambitions extend further than just scientific research and fishing. Concerns have been raised about the PRC wanting to exploit Antarctica’…
  continue reading
 
For the eighth time, listeners provide questions and Rhiannon and Matt answer! In this episode: - Was Antony rehabilitated? - Did Classical Latin have regional dialects? - How did Romans celebrate their birthday? - Who was the first true Roman emperor? - How much of the Roman Empire remains in the modern world? - What were some of the Roman’s most …
  continue reading
 
There has been an escalation of tension between China, Taiwan and the United States in the wake of a visit to Taiwan by United States house speaker Nancy Pelosi, the first visit of such a rank in close to 30 years. While the visit validates Taiwan’s democratic claims, it gives China an incentive to increase hostilities and increase tension in the r…
  continue reading
 
In early 2022 the NGO Civicus added India to its watch list of countries of concern. In doing so it highlighted recent protest movements, arrests of academics, journalists and activists. This discussion examines how India got to this position and the impact on people on the ground in India. Speakers: Professor Nandini Sundar (Sociology, Delhi Schoo…
  continue reading
 
The Indo-Pacific faces multiple security challenges, ranging from the risk of major war arising from territorial and maritime disputes to significant human and environmental threats to ecosystems. Exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, many states remain at odds over governance issues, how to confront pressing regional disputes and how to deal with …
  continue reading
 
Rome has always been a sea-faring power, relying on the Mediterranean for food and trade. But what lies beneath the waves can chill the hearts of mortal men, and tales of aquatic horrors were common in antiquity. Guest: Dr Gillian Shepherd (Director, Trendall Centre, La Trobe University)By Dr Gillian Shepherd
  continue reading
 
Indonesia has made impressive democratic gains since the fall of the authoritarian Suharto regime in 1998, and has long been praised as a ‘model Muslim democracy’. But in recent years, the quality of Indonesian democracy has noticeably declined as the country continues to struggle with challenges to its democratic institutions and values, with syst…
  continue reading
 
Australia has a strong alliance with America, one that has remained unwavering through changes of leadership and turbulent international developments. While agreements such as AUKUS and the Quad have strengthened our position in the region, it has come at the cost of relations with other states and could in the future draw us into conflict. Guest: …
  continue reading
 
With enemies to confront in every direction, Valerian heads back to the east where Shapur and the Parthians are once again threatening the borders of the Roman empire. While Valerian anticipates a victory, what is to come is the greatest defeat of a Roman emperor. Episode III of 'Valerian'. Guest: Associate Professor Caillan Davenport (Head of the …
  continue reading
 
The idea of gender mainstreaming in foreign policy is gaining traction across the world. Several countries such as Sweden, Canada, France, Mexico, Germany, Spain, Luxemburg, Libya, Chile, and most recently the Netherlands have announced Feminist Foreign Policies. Other countries such as Australia, UK, Ireland, Argentina, may not have made formal Fe…
  continue reading
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2023 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service