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Best Scientific American podcasts we could find (updated December 2019)
Best Scientific American podcasts we could find
Updated December 2019
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Join host Steve Mirsky each week as he explores the latest developments in science and technology through interviews with leading scientists and journalists
 
6
60-Second Science
Weekly+
 
Leading science journalists provide a daily minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American . To view all of our archived podcasts please go to www.scientificamerican.com/podcast
 
S
Science Talk
Monthly
 
Science Talk is a weekly science audio show covering the latest in the world of science and technology. Join Steve Mirsky each week as he explores cutting-edge breakthroughs and controversial issues with leading scientists and journalists. He is also an articles editor and columnist at Scientific American magazine. His column, "Antigravity," is one of science writing's great humor venues. Also check our daily podcast from Scientific American : "60-Second Science." To view all of our archived ...
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Join host Steve Mirsky each week as he explores the latest developments in science and technology through interviews with leading scientists and journalists
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Join host Steve Mirsky each week as he explores the latest developments in science and technology through interviews with leading scientists and journalists
 
Join host Steve Mirsky each week as he explores the latest developments in science and technology through interviews with leading scientists and journalists
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Join neuroscientist, philosopher, and best-selling author Sam Harris as he explores important and controversial questions about the human mind, society, and current events. Sam Harris is the author of five New York Times bestsellers. His books include The End of Faith, Letter to a Christian Nation, The Moral Landscape, Free Will, Lying, Waking Up, and Islam and the Future of Tolerance (with Maajid Nawaz). The End of Faith won the 2005 PEN Award for Nonfiction. His writing and public lectures ...
 
Periodic audiocasts from American Scientist, a publication of Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Honor Society.
 
History, hauntings, legends, lore, true crime, and the paranormal activities of small-town America. Hosted by Cody Beck and Troy Taylor, Season 4 explores Haunted New Orleans, while previous seasons discussed Alton, IL, St. Louis, MO, and the Villisca Axe Murders.
 
6
60-Second Science
Weekly+
 
Tune in every weekday for quick reports and commentaries on the world of science—it'll just take a minute
 
6
60-Second Tech
Monthly
 
 
S
Science Talk
Monthly
 
Science Talk is a weekly science audio show covering the latest in the world of science and technology. Join Steve Mirsky each week as he explores cutting-edge breakthroughs and controversial issues with leading scientists and journalists. He is also an articles editor and columnist at Scientific American magazine and his column, "Antigravity", is one of science writing's rate venues for humor. Check our the new daily podcast from Scientific American: "60-Second Science." To view all of our ...
 
6
60-Second Science
Weekly+
 
Tune in every weekday for quick reports and commentaries on the world of science—it'll just take a minute
 
6
60-Second Earth
Monthly
 
Leading science journalists provide a weekly one-minute report on the science of the environment and the future of energy. Scientific American offers three other podcasts: the daily "60-Second Science" and the weekly "60-Second Psych" as well as "Science Talk." To view all our archived podcasts please visit: www.scientificamerican.com/podcast
 
In this podcast series sponsored by Biopharmaceutical Section of American Statistical Association, key opinion leaders from pharmaceutical industry and regulatory agencies talk about upcoming statistical conferences and events, and discuss current issues in Biopharmaceutical statistics.
 
Timely and engaging discussions about advances in clinical research and practice, biomedical science, public health, and health policy.
 
Podcast of the Diseases of the Colon and Rectum (DCR), the official scientific journal of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) - a monthly publication. Podcast includes interviews with select lead or senior authors of newly published articles and includes commentary by an official reviewer.
 
The official podcast of Freedom Scientific, leaders in assistive technology for blind people and those with low vision. Hosted by John and Larry Gasman, FSCast features news, interviews, and product demonstrations relating to Freedom Scientific products such as JAWS and ZoomText. FSCast is a great way to make the most of the products you have as well as learning about what's new and what's around the corner.
 
Informal conversations hosted by science writers Alan Boyle, Jennifer Ouellette, Kelly Hills and Tom Levenson, who, with their guests, explore the often-volatile landscape of science, politics and policy, the history and economics of science, science deniers and its relationship to democracy, and the role of women in the sciences. Produced by Sherry Reson. Hosted in Second Life by the Exploratorium.
 
6
60-Second Health
Monthly
 
Scientific American reporter Dina Fine Maron gives a weekly one-minute report on the latest health and medical news. To view all of our archived podcasts please go to www.scientificamerican.com/podcast
 
In this popular American book from the 1920s, accomplished public speaker and self-help charlatan Elsie Lincoln Benedict outlines her pseudo-scientific system of "Human Analysis". She proposes that, within the human race, five sub-types have developed through evolutionary processes, each with its own distinct character traits and corresponding outward appearance. She offers to teach the reader how to recognise these five types of people and understand their innate differences. Her ideas have ...
 
6
60-Second Space
Monthly
 
Leading science journalists provide a daily minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of astronomy and space exploration. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American . To view all of our archived podcasts please go to www.scientificamerican.com/podcast
 
In this podcast series sponsored by Biopharmaceutical Section of American Statistical Association, key opinion leaders from pharmaceutical industry and regulatory agencies talk about upcoming statistical conferences and events, and discuss current issues in Biopharmaceutical statistics.
 
6
60-Second Mind
Monthly
 
Leading science journalists provide a weekly one-minute commentary on the latest developments in the science of brain and behavior. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American . To view all our archived podcasts please visit: www.scientificamerican.com/podcast
 
The American Museum of Natural History is one of the world's preeminent scientific and cultural institutions. Since its founding in 1869, the Museum has advanced its global mission to discover, interpret and disseminate information about human cultures, the natural world and the universe through a wide-ranging program of scientific research, education and exhibition. The Museum is renowned for its exhibitions and scientific collections, which serve as a field guide to the entire planet and p ...
 
challenging believers to think and thinkers to believe
 
P
Pedo Teeth Talk
Monthly
 
Join AAPD leaders, experts in the field of pediatric dentistry and other professionals for Pedo Talk. We’ll be discussing scientific, clinical and the most up-to-date, relevant information out there for anyone and everyone in the pediatric dental community. Topics include, but are not limited to SDF, Behavior Management, Practice Management, Trauma and more.
 
K
Know idea - SciCast
Daily+
 
Science with the professor! This is a podcast produced around key topics in science and technology. Know Idea is a live broadcast science radio program, 9am Wed AEST on 4ZZZfm and is endorsed by NewScientist Magazine, the Scientific American and Universe Sandbox. 4ZZZ 102.1FM - Agitate/Educate/Organise
 
Podcasts and Resources on the Contemporary Social-Scientific Study of Religion
 
The Journal of Proteome Research integrates the fields of chemistry, mathematics, applied physics, biology, and medicine in order to better understand the function of proteins in biological systems.
 
J
JACC Podcast
Daily
 
Each week, Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, MACC, renowned editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC), records a free podcast highlighting journal findings. To keep clinicians up to date on the most important science emerging in clinical and translational cardiology, Dr. Fuster provides an overview of the weekly edition, and a short summary of each manuscript. The JACC family of journals rank among the top cardiovascular peer-reviewed journals in the world for scien ...
 
“… this war was not one of mere destruction. It set men to thinking as they had never thought before. It intensified their inventive faculties, and as a result, the world is richer in many ways. Lessons of thrift and economy have been taught us. Manufacturers have learned the value of standardization. The business man has gained an appreciation of scientific research. The whole story is too big to be contained within the covers of a single book, but I have selected the more important and int ...
 
D
Data Skeptic
Weekly
 
The Data Skeptic Podcast features interviews and discussion of topics related to data science, statistics, machine learning, artificial intelligence and the like, all from the perspective of applying critical thinking and the scientific method to evaluate the veracity of claims and efficacy of approaches.
 
Challenging believers to think, and thinkers to believe.
 
J
JACC Podcast
Daily
 
Each week, Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, MACC, renowned editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC), records a free podcast highlighting journal findings. To keep clinicians up to date on the most important science emerging in clinical and translational cardiology, Dr. Fuster provides an overview of the weekly edition, and a short summary of each manuscript. The JACC family of journals rank among the top cardiovascular peer-reviewed journals in the world for scien ...
 
A
ACEP SA Replay
Monthly
 
 
A collection of eleven short nonfiction works in the public domain. The items included in this collection were independently selected by the readers, and the topics encompass history, conservation, philosophy, politics, religion and cooking. Included in this collection are Thomas Jefferson's first Inaugural Address, "Secession" by Alexander H. Stephens, "Of Truth" and the preface to "The New Organon, or True Directions Concerning the Interpretation of Nature" by Francis Bacon, John Donne's l ...
 
A monthly podcast highlighting papers published in the American Journal of Perinatology. Hosted by Dr Bill Goodnight and Dr Chris Robinson, each month they interview leading authors in the fields of obstetrics, neonatology, and perinatology.
 
On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first men to walk on the moon. The mission that got them there, Apollo 11, was the culmination of the nation's decade-long cultural and scientific fascination with outer space. In this four-part series, transport back in time, and understand what Apollo 11 felt like to the millions of Americans who lived through it.
 
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show series
 
Playing the sounds of a healthy reef near damaged corals may help bring the fish community back. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
The fiber-optic cables that connect the global Internet could potentially be used as seismic sensors. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
Ground-penetrating radar can detect tiny density differences that lead to images of ancient footprints impossible to discern by eye. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
Indigenous artists in what’s now British Columbia created pigments by cooking aquatic bacteria. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
Journalist and author Beth Gardiner talks about her new book Choked: Life and Breath in the Age of Air Pollution. And CRISPR pioneer Jennifer Doudna talks about gene editing. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
JAMA Medical News is coming to you live from the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions conference in Philadelphia. In this episode, host Jennifer Abbasi chats with conference chair Donald Lloyd-Jones, MD, ScM, about this year's hottest topics and clinical trials. JAMA AHA 2019 Scientific Sessions Website…
 
Playing the sounds of a healthy reef near damaged corals may help bring the fish community back. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
Playing the sounds of a healthy reef near damaged corals may help bring the fish community back. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
Playing the sounds of a healthy reef near damaged corals may help bring the fish community back. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
Playing the sounds of a healthy reef near damaged corals may help bring the fish community back. Christopher Intagliata reports.By Christopher Intagliata
 
Playing the sounds of a healthy reef near damaged corals may help bring the fish community back. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
Playing the sounds of a healthy reef near damaged corals may help bring the fish community back. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
Playing the sounds of a healthy reef near damaged corals may help bring the fish community back. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
Playing the sounds of a healthy reef near damaged corals may help bring the fish community back. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
Playing the sounds of a healthy reef near damaged corals may help bring the fish community back. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
A study done in South America found that with increasing population density, humans had more diversity of fungi on the skin but less microbial diversity in the gut. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
A study done in South America found that with increasing population density, humans had more diversity of fungi on the skin but less microbial diversity in the gut. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
A study done in South America found that with increasing population density, humans had more diversity of fungi on the skin but less microbial diversity in the gut. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
A study done in South America found that with increasing population density, humans had more diversity of fungi on the skin but less microbial diversity in the gut.By Eliene Augenbraun
 
A study done in South America found that with increasing population density, humans had more diversity of fungi on the skin but less microbial diversity in the gut. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
A study done in South America found that with increasing population density, humans had more diversity of fungi on the skin but less microbial diversity in the gut. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
A study done in South America found that with increasing population density, humans had more diversity of fungi on the skin but less microbial diversity in the gut. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
A study done in South America found that with increasing population density, humans had more diversity of fungi on the skin but less microbial diversity in the gut. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
A study done in South America found that with increasing population density, humans had more diversity of fungi on the skin but less microbial diversity in the gut. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
A study done in South America found that with increasing population density humans had more diversity of fungi on the skin but less microbial diversity in the gut. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
The fiber-optic cables that connect the global Internet could potentially be used as seismic sensors. Christopher Intagliata reports.By Christopher Intagliata
 
The fiber-optic cables that connect the global Internet could potentially be used as seismic sensors. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
The fiber-optic cables that connect the global Internet could potentially be used as seismic sensors. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
The fiber-optic cables that connect the global Internet could potentially be used as seismic sensors. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
The fiber-optic cables that connect the global Internet could potentially be used as seismic sensors. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
The fiber-optic cables that connect the global Internet could potentially be used as seismic sensors. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
Buck Woody joins Kyle to share experiences from the field and the application of the Team Data Science Process - a popular six-phase workflow for doing data science.
 
In this episode, Troy and Cody break down THE Haunted House in New Orleans- The LaLaurie Mansion. It was --and is-- the best-known haunted house in the French Quarter and yet its name was seldom mentioned. There was no need. Horrible things had happened there – horrible enough to earn the house a reputation that still lingers more than two cent ...…
 
A few brief reports about international science and technology from Mexico to Tanzania, including one about the need to quarantine bananas in Colombia that are potentially infected by a fungus.By Jennifer Leman
 
A few brief reports about international science and technology from Mexico to Tanzania, including one about the need to quarantine bananas in Colombia that are potentially infected by a fungus. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
A few brief reports about international science and technology from Mexico to Tanzania, including one about the need to quarantine bananas in Colombia that are potentially infected by a fungus. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
A few brief reports about international science and technology from Mexico to Tanzania, including one about the need to quarantine bananas in Colombia that are potentially infected by a fungus. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
A few brief reports about international science and technology from Mexico to Tanzania, including one about the need to quarantine bananas in Colombia that are potentially infected by a fungus. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Scientific American
 
Audio Summary of the December 10 Issue of JACC, by Dr. Valentin Fuster
 
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