show episodes
 
Artwork
 
Huberman Lab discusses neuroscience — how our brain and its connections with the organs of our body control our perceptions, our behaviors, and our health. We also discuss existing and emerging tools for measuring and changing how our nervous system works. Andrew Huberman, Ph.D., is a neuroscientist and tenured professor in the department of neurobiology, and by courtesy, psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford School of Medicine. He has made numerous significant contributions to the ...
  continue reading
 
Artwork
 
Psychedelics Today is the planetary leader in psychedelic education, media, and advocacy. Covering up-to-the-minute developments and diving deep into crucial topics bridging the scientific, academic, philosophical, societal, and cultural, Psychedelics Today is leading the discussion in this rapidly evolving ecosystem.
  continue reading
 
Weekly conversations with authors of new and recent books. Host Richard Aldous is a historian and professor at Bard College, New York, and the author of several books, including Schlesinger: The Imperial Historian; Reagan and Thatcher: The Difficult Relationship; The Lion and the Unicorn: Gladstone vs. Disraeli. For more about American Purpose, visit www.americanpurpose.com.
  continue reading
 
Featuring stories of new scientific research on human flourishing that translate these basic discoveries into practical tools. Bringing a mix of curiosity, compassion, and creativity that will appeal to all ages, journalist Richard Sergay and acclaimed writer/producer Tavia Gilbert shine a spotlight on the human impact at the heart of a cutting-edge social and scientific research project. This project was made possible through the generous support of a grant from Templeton World Charity Foun ...
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
Higher Ed Now

American Council of Trustees and Alumni

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Higher Ed Now is a production of the American Council of Trustees and Alumni. It is a podcast concerning issues and policy in America's higher education system.
  continue reading
 
A half-hour dose of cosmic conversation with scientists, educators and students about the cosmos, scientific frontiers, scifi, comics, and more. Hosted by Dr. Charles Liu, PhD, an astrophysicist at the American Museum of Natural History. Support us on Patreon.
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
O&P Clinical Care Insiders

American Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Join Seth O’Brien, CP, FAAOP(D), as he dissects clinical care topics with leaders of the American Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists Scientific Societies and the O&P profession. During these 30-minute podcasts, guests will discuss their area of clinical care and share personal experiences as professionals in that specialty and beyond, offering a relaxed journey into the professional lives of those that focus on a specific area of O&P patient care.
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
Burner Podcast

Burner Podcast Network

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Independently produced by a revolving team of volunteers and Hosted by founder (mr)Arash, Burner Podcast is the longest running traditional audio podcast in the extended international community of Burning Man. Focused on year-round Burner consciousness and topics of intracultural interest, explore 140+ episodes at burnerpodcast.com/previous-episodes. Burner Podcast host Arash Afshar is an Iranian-American SoCal-based professional photographer and community builder. Connect with him directly ...
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
ASA Biopharm's Podcast

American Statistical Association (ASA) Biopharm. Section

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
In this podcast series sponsored by Biopharmaceutical Section of American Statistical Association, key opinion leaders from pharmaceutical industry and regulatory agencies talk about upcoming statistical conferences and events, and discuss current issues in Biopharmaceutical statistics.
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
JACC Podcast

American College of Cardiology

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Weekly+
 
Each week, renowned editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC), Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, MACC, records free podcasts highlighting journal findings. To keep clinicians updated on the most important science emerging in clinical and translational cardiology, Dr. Fuster provides an overview of the weekly edition, as well as a short summary of each manuscript. Encompassing JACC and nine cardiovascular specialty journals, the JACC family of journals rank among the ...
  continue reading
 
This podcast celebrates the 50th Annual Meeting and Scientific Symposium of the American Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists. In each episode of this special five-part mini-series, we will spend time with a past Clinical Content Committee Chair to learn how the Academy’s Annual Meeting and Scientific Symposium has evolved over the last half-century.
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
ASCRS / DC&R podcast

Diseases of the Colon & Rectum Journal / American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Podcast of the Diseases of the Colon and Rectum (DCR), the official scientific journal of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) - a monthly publication. Podcast includes interviews with select lead or senior authors of newly published articles and includes commentary by an official reviewer.
  continue reading
 
A Northern Irishman's take on all things American. Internationally acclaimed singer/songwriter Keith Semple talks about everything from social issues to political issues with plenty of comedy sprinkled in for levity. Some solo podcasts and some with special guests, Keith will delve deep into current affairs. The plan is to make scientific and social concepts accessible to everyone in a "Semple" way.
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
Science Talk

Scientific American

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Science Talk is a podcast of longer-form audio experiments from Scientific American--from immersive sonic journeys into nature to deep dives into research with leading experts.
  continue reading
 
Welcome to ASRS’s Journal of Vitreoretinal Diseases (JVRD) Author’s Forum. JVRD is the official scientific peer-reviewed journal of the American Society of Retina Specialists (ASRS) offering the highest quality and most impactful research and clinical information in the field. Join host Dr. Timothy Murray, Editor-in-Chief for JVRD as he discusses cutting-edge developments featured in JVRD with the lead authors who share clinical pearls and explore their significance for advancing patient car ...
  continue reading
 
Jen Lumanlan always thought infancy would be the hardest part of parenting. Now she has a toddler and finds a whole new set of tools are needed, there are hundreds of books to read, and academic research to uncover that would otherwise never see the light of day. Join her on her journey to get a Masters in Psychology focusing on Child Development, as she researches topics of interest to parents of toddlers and preschoolers from all angles, and suggests tools parents can use to help kids thri ...
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
What Could Go Right?

The Progress Network with Zachary Karabell and Emma Varvaloucas

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly+
 
What if instead of being on the brink of disaster, we’re on the cusp of a better world? No one can deny the challenges the world faces, from pandemics to climate change to authoritarianism. But pessimism and despair are too easy a response. Each week, Progress Network Founder Zachary Karabell and Executive Director Emma Varvaloucas convene a diverse panel of experts to discuss the central issues of our era, including sustainability, polarization, work, and the economy, and make the case for ...
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
Know Diabetes by Heart™ Professional Education Podcast Series

American Heart Association and American Diabetes Association

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
The American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association are excited to announce a new podcast series for healthcare professionals. Know Diabetes by Heart™ Professional Education Podcast Series focuses on the link between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). The series will consist of relevant cutting-edge topics such as up-to-date standards of care, guidelines and their implications for T2D and CVD, and approaches to shared decision making—among others. The Am ...
  continue reading
 
Who is microbiology? Meet the Microbiologist (MTM) introduces you to the people who discover, innovate and advance the field of microbiology. Go behind-the-scenes of the microbial sciences with experts in virology, bacteriology, mycology, parasitology and more! Share in their passion for microbes and hear about research successes and even a few setbacks in their field. MTM covers everything from genomics, antibiotic resistance, synthetic biology, emerging infectious diseases, microbial ecolo ...
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
60-Second Tech

Scientific American

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Scientific American Online associate tech editor Larry Greenemeier provides a weekly minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of technology
  continue reading
 
Interviews with authors of articles from JAMA Oncology. JAMA Oncology is the definitive journal for scientists, clinicians, and trainees in the field of oncology worldwide. Our original, innovative, and timely scientific and educational content provides a deeper understanding of cancer pathogenesis and recent treatment advances for our readers. JAMA Oncology aims to effectively convey the findings of important clinical research, major scientific breakthroughs, actionable discoveries, and sta ...
  continue reading
 
In the early 1980's, Johnny Delirious worked with one of the first pioneers of the scientific modality – Hair Tissue Mineral Analysis (HTMA), James Davenport - Davenport Laboratories in North Dallas finding the right diet to experience life free of disease. But he did not know he had life threatening hepatitis c. It got bad and sold the business in the 1990s because he had no energy and went for treatment, The doctors said he had 12 million hep c viral load and 96% scar tissue (cirrhosis). T ...
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
AACR Scientific Podcasts

American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
In the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) scientific podcasts, we provide interviews with cancer researchers about their latest work as well as recordings of AACR teleconferences.
  continue reading
 
Artwork
 
Annyeonghaseyo! We are Grace and Sarah, Asian KDrama fans who love to ask, and hopefully find answers to, all of our (and your) Asian drama questions. We cover everything, from silly topics to sensitive and serious issues that come up as we binge. We'll also share some Korean and Chinese language tips, as well as our experiences as diaspora Asians living in the UK and US. Afternoona Asks ND: Quirky, partly queer and quite late diagnosed, we are the Afternoona Asks ND (neurodivergent) squad - ...
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
Spacepod

Carrie Nugent

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Hear stories about the alien moons orbiting our Sun, of cold stars, and the future of space exploration. Every week, scientist Dr. Carrie Nugent chats about an amazing part of our universe with an expert guest. Spacepod is the podcast that gives you an inside look into space exploration. Learn more: http://listentospacepod.com
  continue reading
 
astrology.TV’s Kelli Fox brings you weekly and monthly astrology forecasts. More than just a horoscope, this podcast gives you astrology weather predictions. Find out how the stars are aligning and affecting your zodiac sign for now and the days ahead. The tone and scope of our daily lives are directly influenced by the planets in the sky. This astro-weather report also explains astrological conditions like Mercury retrograde periods, Full Moon and New Moon conditions, intense Eclipse patter ...
  continue reading
 
Artwork

51
Impostrix Podcast

Whitney Knox Lee

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly+
 
Impostrix Podcast validates (smart, talented AF, and often over-qualified) professionals of color who navigate imposter syndrome and racial toxicity in their careers. Through personal anecdotes, historical facts, and scientific data, Civil Rights Attorney and Racial Equity Consultant Whitney Knox Lee and special guests explore how race and racism impact their careers, their personal lives, and their joy. Fear not, this show is about pushing through anyway! So here, we share accessible langua ...
  continue reading
 
Rehabilitation Oncology is an indexed resource for the dissemination of peer-reviewed research-based evidence related to oncologic physical therapy and cancer rehabilitation. The journal provides a forum for scientific and professional exchange among researchers and practitioners throughout the world. The journal serves as the official journal for the Academy of Oncologic Physical Therapy. High standards of quality are maintained through a rigorous, double-blinded peer-review process and adh ...
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
Yield on Cost Podcast

American Money Management LLC

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
The companion podcast to the Yield on Cost newsletter by American Money Management, LLC. YOC is all bout investing in high-quality companies that pay a dividend and can grow their dividend at an above-average rate. Everything you hear here first went out as a newsletter. You can subscribe here https://mailchi.mp/amminvest/yoc-podcast
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
Prized Science

American Chemical Society

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
The American Chemical Society (ACS) gives more than 60 national awards to honor accomplishments in chemistry and service to chemistry. Prized Science strives to give people who may have no special scientific knowledge, the opportunity to watch, listen, and discover how the chemistry behind ACS’ awards transforms life for the better.
  continue reading
 
Artwork
 
For lovers of reading, writing, science and general communication. This podcast will aim at acknowledging the origins of metaphors/idioms and the importance of effective scientific communication. My ambition is to spread knowledge on how we articulate concepts and the creative aspect of diction. Most episodes will focus on the origins of expressions, words of high regard, and the meaning behind them. This can overall allow us to acknowledge that words have just as much power as actions.​ As ...
  continue reading
 
Loading …
show series
 
Large threats to the well-being of humankind such as the pandemic and climate change have cemented the notion that scientists across the globe naturally work together to solve the world’s most pressing problems. In Rivals: How Scientists Learned to Cooperate, historian of science Lorraine Daston traces the trajectory of such cooperation, noting tha…
  continue reading
 
Boston is today one of the world's greatest cities, first in higher education, hospitals, life science companies, and sports teams. It was the home of the Great Puritan Migration, the American Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the first civil rights movement, the abolition movement, and the women's rights movement. But the city that gave us th…
  continue reading
 
Since the Enlightenment, the question has arisen as to how it is possible to think of the “unity of the human race” as a multiplicity. How can the promise of universal equality be combined with the claim to diversity? In Vielheit: Jüdische Geschichte und die Ambivalenzen des Universalismus (Hamburger Editionen, 2022), Till van Rahden takes up this …
  continue reading
 
During presidential campaigns, candidates crisscross the country nonstop—visiting swing states, their home turf, and enemy territory. But do all those campaign visits make a difference when Election Day comes? If so, how and under what conditions? Do they mobilise the partisan faithful or persuade undecided voters? What do campaigns try to achieve …
  continue reading
 
“The things that are happening to North Korea are happening to all of us…they are part of the human community. To say that this is just a problem for North Korea is to say that North Koreans are not part of the human community.” In her new book, Dying for Rights: Putting North Korea’s Human Rights Abuses on the Record (Columbia University Press, 20…
  continue reading
 
An award-winning defense expert tells the story of today’s great power rivalry―the struggle to control artificial intelligence. A new industrial revolution has begun. Like mechanization or electricity before it, artificial intelligence will touch every aspect of our lives―and cause profound disruptions in the balance of global power, especially amo…
  continue reading
 
Michael Johnston's The Middle English Book: Scribes and Readers, 1350-1500 (Oxford UP, 2023) addresses a series of questions about the copying and circulation of literature in late medieval England: How do we make sense of the variety of manuscripts surviving from this period? Who copied and disseminated these diverse manuscripts? Who read the lite…
  continue reading
 
In this episode Modya Silver concludes our four week look into the middah of cleanliness. He reviews the focus on physical cleanliness and how it inspires us to spiritual cleanliness. He also explores how one's own cleanliness helps support others in their own quest for personal growth. All of this and more through looking at the Torah portion of T…
  continue reading
 
Shortly after its introduction, photography transformed the ways Americans made political arguments using visual images. In the mid-19th century, photographs became key tools in debates surrounding slavery. Yet, photographs were used in interesting and sometimes surprising ways by a range of actors. Matthew Fox-Amato, an Assistant Professor at the …
  continue reading
 
The Balkans provided the escape route for tens of thousands of German Jews, and remained a place of refuge until the Nazis brutally shut it off with the mass murder of Jewish refugees on the so-called Kladovo transport starting in September 1941, which can be considered as the beginning of the Holocaust in Europe. Responding to publications about t…
  continue reading
 
Listen to Episode No.8 of All We Mean, a Special Focus of this podcast. All We Mean is an ongoing discussion and debate about how we mean and why. The guests on today's episode are Bill Cope and Mary Kalantzis, professors at the University of Illinois. Today we welcome, too, Duane Searsmith, E-Learning Technical Specialist, Information Trust Instit…
  continue reading
 
In this episode, Joe interviews Alyssa Gursky, LPC: artist, research associate and study therapist at the Social Neuroscience and Psychotherapy (SNaP) lab, and founder of Psychedelic Art Therapy LLC, which pioneers ketamine-assisted art therapy. She talks about her first mushroom experience and how her art and creative process instantly felt differ…
  continue reading
 
Covert violence occurs in all social institutions—including families and close relationships, education, workplaces, politics, mass media, and healthcare—each with its own unique power dynamics that shape the incidence and patterns of these vicious acts. Covert Violence: The Secret Weapon of the Powerless (Bristol University Press, 2023) by Dr. Jac…
  continue reading
 
In his new book, Democracy, Nazi Trials, and Transitional Justice in Germany, 1945-1950 (Cambridge University Press, 2020), Dr. Devin O. Pendas examines how German courts conducted Nazi trials in the immediate postwar context. His work combines close readings of legal discourses in conjunction with very human stories to present a narrative of both …
  continue reading
 
In Visions of a Digital Nation: Market and Monopoly in British Telecommunications (MIT Press, 2024), Jacob Ward explains why the privatization of British Telecom signaled a pivotal moment in the rise of neoliberalism, and how it was shaped by the longer development and digitalization of Britain’s telecommunications infrastructure. When Margaret Tha…
  continue reading
 
In the first half of the twentieth century, Black hemispheric culture grappled with the legacies of colonialism, U.S. empire, and Jim Crow. As writers and performers sought to convey the terror and the beauty of Black life under oppressive conditions, they increasingly turned to the labor, movement, speech, sound, and ritual of everyday “folk.” Man…
  continue reading
 
One war, three collisions: Russia with Ukraine, Europe, and the US. On the second anniversary of the full-scale invasion, Michael Kimmage analyses the disparate factors that led to war in Collisions: The Origins of the War in Ukraine and the New Global Instability (OUP Press, 2024). "After a few anomalous years of peace, Europe became in 2022 what …
  continue reading
 
Juan Perón's decade-long regime, from 1946 to 1955, is often presented as Nazi-fascist and antisemitic - claims that are strongly rooted in Argentina's collective unconscious and popular culture. Challenging this widely held view, Raanan Rein asserts that there was greater Jewish support for Perón than previously believed, and that fewer antisemiti…
  continue reading
 
In his book, Native Southerners: Indigenous History from Origins to Removal(University of Oklahoma Press, 2019), Dr. Gregory D. Smithers effectively articulates the complex history of Native Southerners. Smithers conveys the history of Native Southerners through numerous historical eras while properly reinterpreting popular misconceptions about the…
  continue reading
 
For all the talk of China being a peaceful country with no aggressive intentions, it has behaved like most other rising powers – spending lots of money on its military. But what do we know of how that military is used? James A. Siebens is the editor of China’s Use of Armed Coercion: To Win Without Fighting (Routledge, 2023). Listen to him in conver…
  continue reading
 
C. S. Sherrington said “All the brain can do is to move things". The Brain in Motion: From Microcircuits to Global Brain Function (MIT Press, 2023) shows how much the brain can do "just" by moving things. It gives an amazing overview of the large variety of motor behaviors and the cellular basis of them. It reveals how motor circuits provide the un…
  continue reading
 
Listen to this interview of David Shepherd, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Systems and Software (together with Paris Avgeriou). David Shepherd is Associate Professor at Louisiana State University. We talk about writing well, researching well, reviewing well. David Shepherd : "No, with the manuscripts we screen and review and publish, it's not ab…
  continue reading
 
Post-doctoral research scholar Keo Corak of USDA-ARS Genomics & Bioinformatics Research Unit discusses predictive sugarcane breeding at the joint meeting of the American Sugar Cane League and American Society of Sugarcane Technologists in Baton Rouge in February 2024. A video slide deck can be found of this presentation at the American Sugar Cane L…
  continue reading
 
In 1864, on a midsummer’s day, Kawai Koume, a 60-year old matriarch of a samurai family in Wakayama, makes a note in her diary, which she had dutifully written in for over three decades. There are reports of armed clashes in Kyoto. It’s said that the emperor has ordered the expulsion of the foreigners, and it’s also said that a large band of vagabo…
  continue reading
 
Knut A. Jacobsen's edited volume The Oxford History of Hinduism: Hindu Diaspora (Oxford UP, 2023) presents the histories and religious traditions of Hindus with a South Asian ancestral background living outside of South Asia. Hinduism is a global religion with a significant presence in many countries throughout the world. The most important cause o…
  continue reading
 
Chandrica Barua is the Nonfiction and Online Editor for MQR. A PhD candidate in the Department of English Language and Literature, her dissertation focuses on encounters between imperial objects and colonial bodies in the British Empire, especially in British India. She hails from Assam, India. What draws an editor to a particular essay? In Chandri…
  continue reading
 
“Serbia is a country that has inspired exceptional intellectual interest,” writes Marko Marko Attila Hoare in Serbia: A Modern History (Hurst/Oxford UP, 2024). “It was centrally involved in the crises marking both the start and end of Europe’s 20th century: the outbreak of World War I in 1914 and the Wars of Yugoslav Succession beginning in 1991. Y…
  continue reading
 
Today’s book is: Look Again: The Power of Noticing What Was Always There (Atria/One Signal Publishers, 2024), by Tali Sharot and Cass R. Sunstein, a book that asks why stimulating jobs and breathtaking works of art lose their sparkle after a while. People stop noticing what is most wonderful in their own lives. They also stop noticing what is terri…
  continue reading
 
Isabella Alexander's book Copyright and Cartography: History, Law, and the Circulation of Geographical Knowledge (Bloomsbury, 2023) explores the intertwined histories of mapmaking and copyright law in Britain from the early modern period up to World War 1, focusing chiefly on the 18th and 19th centuries. Taking a multidisciplinary approach and maki…
  continue reading
 
What happens after you die? The book brings together fascinating theological and religious studies perspectives on a controversial yet pervasive idea: reincarnation. An estimated 1 on 5 Americans subscribe to this belief, despite their religious background. Why is this? What are the philosophical, spiritual, pragmatic merits of subscribing to reinc…
  continue reading
 
Hanna Torsh speaks with Alexandra Grey about good governance in linguistically diverse cities. Linguistic diversity is often seen through a deficit lens. Another way of saying this is that it's perceived as a problem, particularly by institutions and governments. However, it doesn’t have to be that way and shouldn’t be that way in a participatory d…
  continue reading
 
The dissolution of the monasteries was recalled by individuals and communities alike as a seismic rupture in the religious, cultural, and socio-economic fabric of early modern England. It was also profoundly important in shaping contemporary historical consciousness, the topographical imagination, and local tradition. Memory and the Dissolution of …
  continue reading
 
"Most lawyers, most actors, most soldiers and sailors, most athletes, most doctors, and most diplomats feel a certain solidarity in the face of outsiders, and, in spite of other differences, they share fragments of a common ethic in their working life, and a kind of moral complicity." – Stuart Hampshire, Justice is Conflict. There are many more exa…
  continue reading
 
Let's talk history y'all, and jump into the vibrant tapestry of how Caribbean people have had a profound impact on Black culture and the civil rights movement in the United States. In this episode, we had the pleasure of conversing with the brilliant Alexandria Miller, a Jamaican American doctoral student and host of Strictly Facts Podcast, who sha…
  continue reading
 
Max Ward’s Thought Crime: Ideology and State Power in Interwar Japan (Duke University Press, 2019) analyzes the trajectory and transformations of the implementation of Japan’s 1925 Peace Preservation Law from its conception until the early years of the 1940s. The law, which began as a state effort to tamp down radicalism and “dangerous thought” (mo…
  continue reading
 
Ingrid Piller speaks with Piers Kelly about a fascinating form of visual communication, Australian message sticks. What does a message stick look like? What is its purpose, and how has the use of message sticks changed over time from the precolonial period via the late 19th/early 20th century and into the present? Why do we know so little about mes…
  continue reading
 
How can we build a more equal economy? In Innovation for the Masses: How to Share the Benefits of the High-Tech Economy (U California Press, 2024), Neil Lee, a Professor of Economic Geography at the London School of Economics, explores the question of how societies have fostered and supported innovation. The book challenges conventional assumptions…
  continue reading
 
In September of 2019, Luis Alberto Quiñonez—known as Sito— was shot to death as he sat in his car in the Mission District of San Francisco. He was nineteen. His killer, Julius Williams, was seventeen. It was the second time the teens had encountered one another. The first, five years before, also ended in tragedy, when Julius watched as his brother…
  continue reading
 
An enduring paradox of urban public health is that many communities around hospitals are economically distressed and, counterintuitively, medically underserved. In The City and the Hospital two sociologists, Jonathan R. Wynn and Berkeley Franz, and a political scientist, Daniel Skinner, track the multiple causes of this problem and offer policy sol…
  continue reading
 
Appealing to Monster Theory and the ancient Near Eastern motif of "Chaoskampf," Safwat Marzouk argues that the paradoxical character of the category of the monster is what prompts the portrayal of Egypt as a monster in the book of Ezekiel. While on the surface the monster seems to embody utter difference, underlying its otherness there is a disturb…
  continue reading
 
"Fascism" is a word ubiquitous in our contemporary political discourse, but few know about its roots in the ancient past or its long, strange evolution to the present. In ancient Rome, the fasces were a bundle of wooden rods bound with a leather cord, in which an axe was placed—in essence, a mobile kit for corporal or capital punishment. Attendants…
  continue reading
 
Authorship represents a new area of policy-related work within higher education research administration, funding agencies, and scholarly journal publishing. Developing Authorship and Copyright Ownership Policies: Best Practices (Rowman & Littlefield, 2024) by Allyson Mower offers the unique aspect of combining details on copyright ownership as well…
  continue reading
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide