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Best Public Lectures podcasts we could find (updated April 2020)
Best Public Lectures podcasts we could find
Updated April 2020
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Audio podcasts of public lectures, seminars and events from the SOAS Department of Economics. The SOAS Department of Economics is a leading centre for economic research. We have a vibrant research culture driven by staff working on a plethora of issues, but we specialise in the study of developing and emerging economies and our work covers an unparalleled range of countries and regions.
 
The University of Bath podcasts are a series of public lectures available to download for free. Enhance your understanding of subjects ranging from how babies develop to the workings of the universe. Learn from academics and business and industry experts. The University of Bath is a leading UK insitution. We offer a distinctive blend of research-led teaching, an outstanding graduate employment record and personal development opportunties.
 
The Department of Physics public lecture series. An exciting series of lectures about the research at Oxford Physics take place throughout the academic year. Looking at topics diverse as the creation of the universe to the science of climate change. Features episodes previously published as: (1) 'Oxford Physics Alumni': "Informal interviews with physics alumni at events, lectures and other alumni related activities." (2) 'Physics and Philosophy: Arguments, Experiments and a Few Things in Bet ...
 
Podcasts of the lectures and in-conversation events with acclaimed actors, directors, playwrights, and academics, on modern and historic performances inspired by ancient Greek and Roman texts - hosted by the Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama. For upcoming public events please visit the APGRD website.
 
The Birkbeck Department of Politics and its research centre, the Centre for the Study of British Politics and Public Life, hosts a range of talks, lectures, seminars and workshops throughout the year. Our events feature leading academics, public figures and commentators from a range of fields. Listen to them here.
 
Big Ideas offers lectures on a variety of thought-provoking topics which range across politics, culture, economics, art history, science.... By nature of its lecture format, pacing and inquisitive approach, it is the antithesis of the prevailing sound-bite television norm. The simple, bold concept is a victory of substance over style. Big Ideas airs Saturdays and Sundays at 5:00 PM EST on TVO - Canada's largest educational broadcaster.
 
Big Ideas offers lectures on a variety of thought-provoking topics which range across politics, culture, economics, art history, science.... By nature of its lecture format, pacing and inquisitive approach, it is the antithesis of the prevailing sound-bite television norm. The simple, bold concept is a victory of substance over style.
 
Since 1980, City Arts & Lectures has presented onstage conversations with outstanding figures in literature, politics, criticism, science, and the performing arts, offering the most diverse perspectives about ideas and values. City Arts & Lectures programs can be heard on more than 130 public radio stations across the country and wherever you get your podcasts. The broadcasts are co-produced with KQED 88.5 FM in San Francisco. Visit CITYARTS.NET for more info.
 
The British Studies program at the University of Texas at Austin was created in 1975. For more than thirty years the program has sponsored public lectures in English literature, history, and government, and has conducted a weekly seminar called the Faculty Seminar on British Studies that includes faculty members, graduate students, undergraduates, and members of the Austin community.
 
The Familiar Strange is a podcast about doing anthropology: that is, about listening, looking, trying out, and being with, in pursuit of uncommon knowledge about humans and culture. Find show notes, plus our blog about anthropology's role in the world, at https://www.thefamiliarstrange.com. Twitter: @tfsTweets. FB: facebook.com/thefamiliarstrange. Instagram: @thefamiliarstrange. Brought to you by your familiar strangers: Ian Pollock, Jodie-Lee Trembath, Julia Brown, Simon Theobald, Kylie Won ...
 
History Chats is a podcast series from Activehistory.ca. Each Saturday we will post a different talk from our collection of world class historians. These will include conference sessions, public lectures, and roundtable discussions. So get your weekend started on a high note with History Chats.
 
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So much noise, so many opinions. Perhaps time for Occam's Razor to start its scientific shaving? In this latest Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture Alan Champneys argues that Mathematics is at its best when it challenges assumptions. For example the wobbling of the Millennium Bridge in London in 2000.Caused by crowds synchronising? Alan begs to diffe…
 
Rebecca Riley (Centre of Excellence, NIESR)XVI IDP Lecture – Organised by SOAS Economics Research Cluster on Industrial Development and Policy.Many advanced economies have seen a slowdown in productivity growth since the middle of the 2000s. In the UK this slowdown has been particularly stark. A decade on from the global financial crisis UK product…
 
Stony Brook University Professor Nancy Tomes taught a class about the 1918 influenza pandemic and public information efforts in the United States to stop the spread of the disease. She described methods such as canceling public gatherings, social distancing, and propaganda about good hygiene, which are still implemented. This class was filmed on Ma…
 
Presented by Sara Webb and Grace Lawrence on Friday 28 February 2020. When we look to the stars, what we see is a fraction of the universe – only around 5%. Astronomers observe that a mysterious ‘dark universe’ of strange and enigmatic dark energy and dark matter makes up the remaining 95%. Swinburne PhD candidates Sara Webb and Grace Lawrence are …
 
In his latest book, journalist Jay Weiner details the extraordinary life of Professor Hy Berman. Written as an autobiography co-authored by Weiner, Professor Berman: The Last Lecture of Minnesota’s Greatest Public Historian (University of Minnesota Press, 2019) captures the eloquent, profound, and often humorous voice of one of Minnesota’s most inf…
 
Darren Henley OBE is Chief Executive of the Arts Council England. He has led two independent reviews into music and cultural education which resulted in England’s first National Plan for Music Education, new networks of Music Education Hubs, Cultural Education Partnerships and Heritage Schools, the Museums and Schools programme, the BFI Film Academ…
 
Speaker(s): Dr Maya Goodfellow | Maya Goodfellow will examine the UK’s hostility toward certain groups of immigrants and unpick anti-immigration narratives to argue for a positive understanding of immigration. Maya Goodfellow (@MayaGoodfellow) is a writer, broadcast commentator and academic. She is the author of Hostile Environment: How Immigrants …
 
Several large UK banks have suspended dividend payments to shareholders to preserve cash. The move was requested by the Bank of England's Prudential Regulation Authority, and Russ Mould of the investment management firm A J Bell offers his analysis. In the US, big banks have said they will suspend share buybacks during the crisis. Randy Krozner is …
 
Kimberly A. Hamlin is an award-winning historian and associate professor in American studies at Miami University of Ohio. Her book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W. W. Norton, 2020) offers a fascinating biography of a little-known suffrage leader. Gardner began life as Alice Chenoweth. Moving away…
 
Latvia's elegant capital, Riga, is one of Europe's best-kept secrets. Strategically located on the Eastern Baltic coast at the mouth of the River Daugava, Riga was founded in the early 13th century as a trading hub, a military outpost of the Holy Roman Empire, and a base for Roman Catholic prelates to convert both the pagan natives and the Orthodox…
 
Kimberly A. Hamlin is an award-winning historian and associate professor in American studies at Miami University of Ohio. Her book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W. W. Norton, 2020) offers a fascinating biography of a little-known suffrage leader. Gardner began life as Alice Chenoweth. Moving away…
 
Coming of Age in Jim Crow DC: Navigating the Politics of Everyday Life (NYU Press, 2019) by Paula C. Austin, an Assistant Professor of history at Boston University, is not only a history of black youth in Washington D.C. in the 1930s but also a history of social science thought as illustrated in the work of scholars such as sociologists E. Franklin…
 
Did modern Hinduism truly emerge due to the “reforms” instigated by “progressive” colonial figures such as Rammohun Roy? Brian A. Hatcher's new book Hinduism Before Reform (Harvard University Press, 2020) challenges this prevalent notion. Aimed at sidestepping the obfuscating binary of “progressive” vs “traditional”, this book examines in tandem tw…
 
Coming of Age in Jim Crow DC: Navigating the Politics of Everyday Life (NYU Press, 2019) by Paula C. Austin, an Assistant Professor of history at Boston University, is not only a history of black youth in Washington D.C. in the 1930s but also a history of social science thought as illustrated in the work of scholars such as sociologists E. Franklin…
 
Kimberly A. Hamlin is an award-winning historian and associate professor in American studies at Miami University of Ohio. Her book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W. W. Norton, 2020) offers a fascinating biography of a little-known suffrage leader. Gardner began life as Alice Chenoweth. Moving away…
 
There have been desperate scenes in India as migrant workers head home under lockdown. In many places, the result has been transport jammed with people and luggage, which is extra perilous with the risk of a spreading virus. Those who haven't found transport have resorted to walking in many cases as much as hundreds of kilometres. Meena Kandasamy i…
 
Women and Buddhist Philosophy: Engaging Zen Master Kim Iryŏp (University of Hawaii Press, 2017) by Jin Y. Park, professor of philosophy and religion at American university, is an account of the Korean Buddhist nun, Kim Iryŏp’s life and philosophy, which takes place from 1896-1971. Park eclectically references philosophers, feminists, and Buddhists …
 
So what is Western Civilization, anyway? The term itself is under assault from progressives, as if the very notion is somehow passé and is not inclusive enough in a globalized world. But, the fact is, our daily lives in the U.S and throughout much of the world are governed by core values and concepts that grow out of two inextricably linked aspects…
 
The city of Chicago is one of the US' most diverse cosmopolitan areas. Given the array of people who live in the city, it is reasonable to assume that the goals of the various communities differ in regard to sport and its social functions. Gerald R. Gems' new book, Sport and the Shaping of Civic Identity in Chicago (Lexington Books, 2020) provides …
 
In We Don't Believe You: Why Populists and the Establishment See the World Differently (Bite-Sized Book, 2019), Sir John Redwood gives us fresh insights into why the populist movements and parties have been winning elections. He looks at how the experts and narrative pushed out by the established elites on both sides of the Atlantic have met with d…
 
Christina Wolbrecht and J. Kevin Corder have a new book that builds on their previous work exploring women and suffrage in the United States, Counting Women’s Ballots: Female Voters from Suffrage through the New Deal (Cambridge University Press, 2016). A Century of Votes for Women: American Elections Since Suffrage (Cambridge University Press, 2020…
 
Christina Wolbrecht and J. Kevin Corder have a new book that builds on their previous work exploring women and suffrage in the United States, Counting Women’s Ballots: Female Voters from Suffrage through the New Deal (Cambridge University Press, 2016). A Century of Votes for Women: American Elections Since Suffrage (Cambridge University Press, 2020…
 
The city of Chicago is one of the US' most diverse cosmopolitan areas. Given the array of people who live in the city, it is reasonable to assume that the goals of the various communities differ in regard to sport and its social functions. Gerald R. Gems' new book, Sport and the Shaping of Civic Identity in Chicago (Lexington Books, 2020) provides …
 
Whilst many businesses suffer as a result of coronavirus, gaming is bucking the trend. Miles Jacobson is from Sports Interactive, the firm behind the Football Manager series of video games, and tells us why they recently decided to give the game away free for a limited period in the midst of the coronavirus crisis. We find out how all the additiona…
 
One of the most divisive international issues in American politics today is over Israel and Palestine. The close ties between Israel and the United States are very strong and see considerable cooperation between the two countries. However, that cooperation is also challenged because of the status of the Palestinian people and growing concern over t…
 
Paradox is a sophisticated kind of magic trick. A magician's purpose is to create the appearance of impossibility, to pull a rabbit from an empty hat. Yet paradox doesn't require tangibles, like rabbits or hats. Paradox works in the abstract, with words and concepts and symbols, to create the illusion of contradiction. There are no contradictions i…
 
One of the most divisive international issues in American politics today is over Israel and Palestine. The close ties between Israel and the United States are very strong and see considerable cooperation between the two countries. However, that cooperation is also challenged because of the status of the Palestinian people and growing concern over t…
 
Paradox is a sophisticated kind of magic trick. A magician's purpose is to create the appearance of impossibility, to pull a rabbit from an empty hat. Yet paradox doesn't require tangibles, like rabbits or hats. Paradox works in the abstract, with words and concepts and symbols, to create the illusion of contradiction. There are no contradictions i…
 
In Darwin, Dharma, and the Divine. Evolutionary Theory and Religion in Modern Japan (University of Hawaii Press, 2017), G. Clinton Godart (Associate Professor at Tohoku University’s Department of Global Japanese Studies) brings to life more than a century of ideas by examining how and why Japanese intellectuals, religious thinkers of different fait…
 
Paradox is a sophisticated kind of magic trick. A magician's purpose is to create the appearance of impossibility, to pull a rabbit from an empty hat. Yet paradox doesn't require tangibles, like rabbits or hats. Paradox works in the abstract, with words and concepts and symbols, to create the illusion of contradiction. There are no contradictions i…
 
We take the temperature of China's economy amid signs it is sputtering back into life. Herbert Lun is chief executive of Wing Sang Electrical in Shenzhen, and tells us how business is going. Meanwhile Benjamin Speyer, chief executive of technology consultancy Serica says that whilst restrictions have been lifted in the wake of the coronavirus outbr…
 
Jessica Wilkerson, Assistant Professor of History and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi, discusses her book, To Live Here, You Have to Fight: How Women Led Appalachian Movements for Social Justice (University of Illinois Press, 2018) and the recent history of feminist social justice activism in Appalachia. Launched in 1964, the War …
 
Germany’s winter campaign of 1941–1942 is commonly seen as the Wehrmacht's first defeat. In Retreat from Moscow: A New History of Germany's Winter Campaign, 1941-1942 (FSG, 2019), David Stahel argues that it was in fact their first strategic success in the east. The mismanaged Soviet Counteroffensive became a phyrric victory as both sides struggled…
 
Jessica Wilkerson, Assistant Professor of History and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi, discusses her book, To Live Here, You Have to Fight: How Women Led Appalachian Movements for Social Justice (University of Illinois Press, 2018) and the recent history of feminist social justice activism in Appalachia. Launched in 1964, the War …
 
The “historical sciences”—geology, paleontology, and archaeology—have made extraordinary progress in advancing our understanding of the deep past. How has this been possible, given that the evidence they have to work with offers mere traces of the past? In Rock, Bone, and Ruin: An Optimist’s Guide to the Historical Sciences (MIT Press, 2018), Adria…
 
Has can theatre confront racial inequality? In Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Performing Arts Workforce (Routledge, 2020), Tobie S. Stein, Professor Emerita in the Department of Theater, Brooklyn College, CUNY, analyses the longstanding failure of America’s theatre industry to address issues of diversity. Drawing on interviews with 70 practitio…
 
Nearly 3.3 million people registered to claim jobless benefits for the week ended 21 March, according to Department of Labor data. That's nearly five times more than the previous record of 695,000 set in 1982. We hear from Cary Leahey at Decision Economics. In the UK, it's been announced that self-employed workers can apply for a grant worth 80% of…
 
As new US unemployment claims hit a record, the G20 met online to discuss a global rescue. Adam Posen is president of the Peterson Institute for International Economics, and advised UK prime minister Gordon Brown ahead of the historic G20 meeting in 2009 where leaders agreed to plough more than $1 trillion into the world economy. He tells us how ef…
 
In his new book Muslim American Politics and the Future of US Democracy (New York University Press, 2019), Edward E. Curtis IV interrogates the limitations of American liberalism in light of the states’ and its various actor’s exclusionary politics and rhetoric around Muslim American citizens. Curtis argues that the place of Muslim Americans in the…
 
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