Humanities Education public
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Best Humanities Education Podcasts We Could Find
Best Humanities Education Podcasts We Could Find
The study of human culture is called humanities. This is a broad subject which covers philosophy, literature, religion, art, music, history and language. Since the human beings began studying and recording humanity, different areas arose including psychology, sociolinguistics, applied linguistics, psycholinguistics and other social science subjects. Humanities education gives people the understanding of how humans act across the globe and how humans used to live, before the modern civilization came into existence. The recent archaeological finds and archaeological digs which might give us the answer to early unresolved mysteries are being discussed by experts in some of the podcasts. Humanities are an interesting subject and listening to these podcasts encourage people to make sense of them. There are several podcasts to choose from, so feel free to listen to the podcasts in this catalog, which may help you get a better understanding of society and humanities, anywhere and anytime.
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Co-hosts Martha Barnette and Grant Barrett talk with callers who have questions and stories about linguistics, old sayings, word histories, etymology, regional dialects, slang, new words, word play, word games, grammar, family expressions, books, literature, writing, and more. Your language questions: https://waywordradio.org/contact or words@waywordradio.org. Call toll-free *any* time in the U.S. and Canada at 1 (877) 929-9673. From elsewhere in the world: +1 619 800 4443. All past shows ar ...
 
Learning a new language? Get your language learning questions answered by polyglot Olly Richards, who speaks 8 languages and runs the popular blog - I Will Teach You A Language. Whatever's holding you back on the path to fluency, tune in twice a week to get your regular dose of language learning motivation, with Olly and other polyglot guests, such as Benny Lewis, Luca Lampariello, Richard Simcott and Alex Rawlings. Learn Spanish, Learn French, Learn German, Learn Italian, Learn Portuguese, ...
 
Story Archaeology combines the breadth of knowledge and skills of the storyteller with academic exploration of ancient texts. We focus on the Irish tradition, peeling back the layers of modern folklore to unearth the potsherds and treasuries of our heritage. At https://storyarchaeology.com, you will find regular podcasts and articles about Irish Mythology by the Story Archaeologists; Chris Thompson and Isolde Carmody.
 
Have you ever taken a language class? Have you taken a language class that teaches you how to say "I want to work at the United Nations" before "can you pass me the salt?" We're working to fix that. Critical Language Mentor has scoured the internet to find the best resources out there to help you learn languages better. We specialize in critical, less-commonly taught languages, like Arabic, Chinese, Korean, and Persian and want to help you learn better. Visit us on the web at criticallanguag ...
 
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After a great career in another field with a major corporation, including many years in upper management, Amy Fortney Wolpert switched careers, got un undergrad and master's degree, and started doing CRM archaeology in California. On today's show she tells her story. Amy is a driven person and her story and drive can be an inspiration for anyone in…
 
Lukas van Vyve is the founder of Effortless Conversations and the co-founder of Spring Spanish, a new site and YouTube channel that uses the power of "Conversation Based Chunking" to help you get fluent faster. In our conversation, we talk about: What it's like to grow up in a country where 3 languages are spoken (Hint: it's not what you think!). W…
 
Today’s podcast features Dr. Neha Gupta, Assistant Professor in Anthropology at The University of British Columbia, Okanagan. We talk about how archaeology in both India and Canada is shaped by colonialism in different and similar ways. Dr. Gupta explains how she is perceived working in the two different settings as a South Asian woman and how she …
 
In this special episode, we discuss the potential closing of the Archaeology Department at Sheffield University with Dr. Umberto Albarella and Helen Thompson. Dr. Albarella is faculty in the Archaeology Department and Helen is a Ph.D. student in the program. They fill us in on what's going at the University of Sheffield, the events leading up to th…
 
This week, we talk about the first (known) human arrivals in this region, waaaay way down at the tip of South America, and the archaeological remains that tell us how they lived. We've got a cave of hands, commentary from Charles Darwin, old old feet, fish ears, and SO much more! Links Peopling time, spatial occupation and demography of Late Pleist…
 
Don't move my cheese! It's a phrase middle managers use to talk about adapting to change in the workplace. It comes from a popular 1990s business book featuring a fable about mice and tiny humans inside a maze and how they respond when their chewy food source is relocated. Plus, the origin story of the name William, and why it's I in Spanish. And a…
 
A recent article discussing the discover of over 200 child burials in Canada has brought the Canadian Residential School system back into the light. The schools were for First Nations children to be indoctrinated into white society. They striped children of languangen and identity and forced them into gender-typical labor. it was a horrifying time …
 
A recent article discussing the discover of over 200 child burials in Canada has brought the Canadian Residential School system back into the light. The schools were for First Nations children to be indoctrinated into white society. They striped children of languangen and identity and forced them into gender-typical labor. it was a horrifying time …
 
On today’s episode Dr. Garfinkel interviews an icon of North American archaeology, Dr. David Hurst Thomas. He has been a curator of prehistory at the American Museum of Natural History, New York City for nearly 50 years. Dr. Thomas discusses how he got into archaeology and some of the big discoveries that he is known for. Links California Rock Art …
 
Paul and Chris start the show talking about tech challenges when in remote areas. How do you get internet? What about charging your devices? In segment two we review the previous episode regarding convolutional neural networks and using programs like that to identify artifacts. Segment three has some great tech tips and some talk about the new iPad…
 
Like me, Aletta Mazlin is a big believer in learning languages through stories. Her passion for story-telling has led to the creation of a number of fantastic language learning resources, including The French Experiment, The Italian Experiment, The Spanish Experiment, and The German Project. Her latest project is called The Fable Cottage, a delight…
 
In this episode, we chat with Dr. Mason Brown, a guest assistant professor for Kathmandu University Department of Music and Affiliate Scholar for the University of Colorado Boulder’s Center for Asian Studies. We delve into his early interests in ethnomusicology / Tibetan culture and get into the details of what ethnomusicology is. Dr. Brown talks a…
 
In 1953, archaeologist Kathleen Kenyon and her team uncovered human skulls covered with plaster and decorated with shells to resemble human faces. These Neolithic artifacts may be one of the earliest known examples of human portraits. In this sponsored episode, we’ll dig into the discovery, the site of Jericho itself, and the lives of the people wh…
 
You may have a favorite word in English, but what about your favorite in another language? The Spanish term ojala is especially handy for expressing hopefulness and derives from Arabic for "God willing." In Trinidad, if you want to ask friends to hang out with you, invite them to go liming. Nobody's sure about this word's origin, although it may in…
 
This week we have 3 stories of Archaeology in the news. First, the oldest petroglyphs in Scotland, and also the only animal shapes, were discovered by an amateur archaeologist. Second, we discuss new developments in lithic dating using OSL. And finally, a large scale environmental survey on an Air Force base is announced in Wyoming. Links 'An incre…
 
This week we have 3 stories of Archaeology in the news. First, the oldest petroglyphs in Scotland, and also the only animal shapes, were discovered by an amateur archaeologist. Second, we discuss new developments in lithic dating using OSL. And finally, a large scale environmental survey on an Air Force base is announced in Wyoming. Links 'An incre…
 
On today’s episode we talk about the ideas behind Dr. Garfinkel’s dissertation. He used linguistics to determine some interesting things about the early peopling of the Americans. Links California Rock Art Foundation Contact Chris Webster chris@archaeologypodcastnetwork.com Twitter: @archeowebby Dr. Alan Garfinkel avram1952@yahoo.com Affiliates Wil…
 
In this episode, we talk with Shubhangni Gupta, also known as Shubhi, who is a second-year Anthropology/Archaeology Ph.D. student at Stanford specializing in critical heritage studies in India. Tune in as we have a real chat about her experiences coming to the US, learning during a COVID world, and her life within these first two years of a Ph.D. L…
 
Tallulah Cloos is between her junior and senior year at college and is working in CRM this summer (2021). She’s also a listener of the CRM Archaeology Podcast. As her and her friend were driving to a job they listened to the podcast for advice on what to expect. Why? Because you don’t get this in college - STILL. We give Tallulah and all new archaa…
 
Today I'm joined by Mikkel Thorup, host of the Expat Money Show podcast. ExpatMoneyShow.com Have you ever dreamt of living abroad? Well today, you're going to find out everything you need to know about the nuts and bolts of becoming an expat, including: The best places to become an expat The difference between: Tourist visas, Permanent residency, a…
 
This month we start a new 5 part mini series covering zooarchaeoogy through time. This episode focuses on the early prehistoric period (Palaeolithic - Early Bronze Age), where we’ll se the shift from hunting to farming and domestication. This episode’s case studies are Covesea Caves and Star Carr. Links http://www.starcarr.com/ https://coveseacaves…
 
In this episode, we are chatting with Dr. Jamie Goodall. Dr. Goodall is currently a staff historian at the U.S. Army Center of Military History and has just released a book about pirates. Her new book is titled, Pirates of the Chesapeake: From the Colonial Era to the Oyster Wars. We grapeshot her with questions about pirates and she enlightens us. …
 
Listeners, once again, life has come at us like a poorly written simile, so we're releasing a previous Patreon episode. And once again, we are so deeply grateful for your patience and support. Thank you for sticking with us. As an extension of March Madagascarness, we head back to the island with our (ill-fitting) primatology hats on. Anna put toge…
 
If you speak a second or third language, you may remember the first time you dreamed in that new tongue. But does this milestone mean you're actually fluent? And a couple's dispute over the word regret: Say you wish you'd been able to meet Albert Einstein. Can you regret that the two of you never met, or is there a better word for a situation over …
 
We have three articles for you today. The first is about current climate models and how they don't take archaeological information into consideration. For example, how many acres of food were grown per person in 1500 Europe verses China? Next we look at why pig and fish remains were in abundance in some ancient Judean settlements? Weren't they supp…
 
We have three articles for you today. The first is about current climate models and how they don't take archaeological information into consideration. For example, how many acres of food were grown per person in 1500 Europe verses China? Next we look at why pig and fish remains were in abundance in some ancient Judean settlements? Weren't they supp…
 
Our StoryLearning Challenges for June begin on 1 June! Here are the topics: SPANISH - Perfect Object Pronouns FRENCH - Subjunctive Made Simple ITALIAN - Perfect Object Pronouns GERMAN - Declension Demystified JAPANESE - 101 Essential Japanese Verbs To enrol, visit: http://storylearningchallenge.com/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/iw…
 
Carlos Gallinger joins the podcast again as a Big Horn Sheep expert. He talks about modern migration patterns of the animal and how that can help archaeologists find petroglyphs and understand better the prehistoric people that hunted and revered them. Links California Rock Art Foundation Contact Chris Webster chris@archaeologypodcastnetwork.com Tw…
 
We speak with Dr. Pawlowicz of Northern Arizona University about a recent paper he was involved in that used convolutional neural networks to classify ceramics in the American Southwest. There are a lot of applications to this technology and some people love it and some think it’s going to take the jobs of archaeologists. Links Heritage Daily: “Arc…
 
The long arm of the prehistoric past reaches through the millennia to grab our attention, and, in this episode, to grab us by the throat. Yes, we’re talking folk horror in this episode, and trying not to shiver as we discuss how the past intrudes in uncanny ways on the present in films, plays and books. We have a full cast of characters in this spi…
 
In the early 1500s, a series of marriages between European royal families re-shaped the face of Europe and brought together separate regions under the leadership of a single ruler. This led to creation of modern Spain and the formation of a massive European empire ruled by the Habsburg family. It also secured the position of the Tudors in England, …
 
In this episode, I speak with Mari Salvestrini, a polyglot based in the Netherlands who has had language learning adventures all over the world, including time in Spain, Belgium, and Italy. She speaks Spanish, English, Dutch, Italian, and Portuguese, and is currently learning German and Japanese. In our conversation, you'll hear how she has learned…
 
Today’s podcast features Dr. Jenny Davis, a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation and an Associate Professor of Anthropology and American Indian Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbaana-Champaign. She is the director of the American Indian Studies Program and the 2019-2023 Chancellor's Fellow of Indigenous Research & Ethics. We get in depth on lang…
 
It's Amber's birthday episode! Since she loves historiography, we're taking it back to one of the earliest historians, Herodotus. How did he think about the past, and how did that influence historians who came after him? What did he get right, and what did he get wrong? What's up with that weird boat, those mummy enemas, the flying snakes, and the …
 
For this episode of Just the Boyz, the hosts attempt to discuss the events leading up to the American Revolution and the first year of the fight for America's Independence from the English Crown. Early on in this episode, you can tell that hosts have a lot to say without a really coherent plan as to how to say it. The guys are all over the place wi…
 
Ribbon fall. Gallery forest. You won't find terms like these in most dictionaries, but they and hundreds like them are discussed by famous writers in the book Home Ground: A Guide to the American Landscape. The book is an intriguing collection of specialized vocabulary that invites us to look more closely at the natural world -- and delight in its …
 
This week on The Archaeology Show, we discuss three exciting Archaeology Articles and News stories. First, two obsidian flakes from central Oregon have been found in an early Holocene settlement in Lake Huron. Second, an extensive cemetery in Poland gives the Wielbark civilization its name. And finally, researchers in Arizona have programmed a comp…
 
This week on The Archaeology Show, we discuss three exciting Archaeology Articles and News stories. First, two obsidian flakes from central Oregon have been found in an early Holocene settlement in Lake Huron. Second, an extensive cemetery in Poland gives the Wielbark civilization its name. And finally, researchers in Arizona have programmed a comp…
 
In this episode, we discuss the completely normal (somewhat irrational fear) of having anxiety during public speaking. Sometimes it's difficult to maintain focus during a debate or when a teacher calls on you in class. Whether it be in an academic setting, work, or presenting at conferences, we want to reassure you that it is completely fine. Tune …
 
Dr. Alan Garfinkel has studied animal-human headdresses in the eastern Mojave desert for much of his career. These items help shamans commune with the spirit world and show the people they support that prosperity is coming. What do these date to? What were they made of? All this and more on today's episode. Links California Rock Art Foundation Cont…
 
Archaeology and Ale is a monthly series of talks presented by Archaeology in the City, part of the University of Sheffield Archaeology Department’s outreach programme. This month we are proud to host Maureen Carroll speaking on "Making Wine for the Emperor on the Roman Imperial Estate at Vagnari (Italy) with Maureen Carroll". This talk took place o…
 
Archaeology and Ale is a monthly series of talks presented by Archaeology in the City, part of the University of Sheffield Archaeology Department’s outreach programme. This month we are proud to host Maureen Carroll speaking on "Making Wine for the Emperor on the Roman Imperial Estate at Vagnari (Italy) with Maureen Carroll". This talk took place o…
 
Whether you are just living your life or you're the person in charge, we all have "projects" to manage and we need tools to get them done. What do our hosts use to keep multiple projects at a time on track and on budget? How do you deal with email, messaging, and calendars? Let us know the tools you use for project management. Links 5 AM Club Flip …
 
In this episode, I speak with Michael Schmitz, the man behind the site Smarter German and the author of How to Learn German Faster. He holds a master's degree in German as a Foreign Language, and has been teaching the language all the way back to 1999. After teaching in traditional language schools for many years, Michael grew increasingly frustrat…
 
In this edition of Our Ruined Lives, Morgan Kinney, a graduate student at Adams State University, joins the hosts to talk about his career in cultural resources management. Morgan is pursuing an M.A. in CRM, which provided an opportunity for the hosts to discuss the differences between a CRM-based M.A. and a general Anthropology M.A. We close the e…
 
We haven’t covered much archaeology from the Amazon Basin on the show, but this week, that changes! Instead of being the primitive groups early European explorers reported on, people lived in the Amazon Basin region for thousands of years by adapting to their landscape as well as modifying their environment to suit their needs! Somehow, we suspect …
 
The word filibuster has a long and colorful history, going back to the days when pirates roamed the high seas. Today it refers to hijacking a piece of legislation. Plus, the language of yoga teachers: When doing a guided meditation, you may hear your instructor speaking in a kind of continuous present, with phrases like Sitting comfortably and Brea…
 
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