show episodes
 
Humans Being is one-hour podcast hosted by world-renowned saxophonist Kirk Whalum. In each episode, Kirk will guide us through an entertaining mix of stories from his lengthy career, musings on spirituality and politics, observations about world events and conversations with celebrities and media personalities. And, of course, impromptu jam sessions with artists you know and some you should know. Kirk’s objective is to inspire, entertain and increase our collective spiritual territory!
 
3 friends separated by distance, connected by brotherhood having conversations about whatever sparks our interest this week! We cover entertainment, pop culture, politics, and family topics. We are not experts on anything, but we have opinions on everything!
 
This audio experience takes listeners on a thought-provoking journey through the triumphs, challenges, and achievements of some of our country’s most righteous Black men. Themes are made more personal by the voices and testimony of DC community members in the Deanwood neighborhood and Ron Brown High School students. Start at any one of 8 tour stops, but to follow our guided path, start at Ron Brown High School. Ron Brown High School students, teachers, and Deanwood community members featured ...
 
Listen as two seasoned hip hop savants rekindle an old friendship through their ongoing love for Hip Hop culture. @big_phil_aka_ns_itchy and @iamspFresh reflect on the coming of age of Hip Hop and their personal lives. Fresh Two Deaf Podcast not only works to breakdown the anatomy of poetic artistry but documents the restart of a pure brotherhood.
 
Talking of the Couch podcast is a weekly podcast that focuses on mental health and mental wellness with in the communities of color. These conversations will be with Tatiana Smith, a Licensed Professional Counselor in Dallas, Texas. It's time to shed light and break stigmas within the black culture about mental health/illness and mental wellness as well as in other communities of color. This podcast is a voice for the mental health community as well as the average person who may be strugglin ...
 
Meet BlackFacts.com, the Internet's longest running Black History Encyclopedia - Delivering Black History, Culture, Vides and News to our followers. This podcast series provides your daily Black Facts Of The Day™. In addition there will be occasion bonus episodes focused on diversity or other key topics of interest to our BlackFacts audience Learn black history, Teach black history - https://blackfacts.com
 
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show series
 
On this episode of R&R on Sports, Howard and Larry sits down with Olympic gold medalist Rochelle Stevens as we continue our hard hitting series What if They Committed? We get into Rochelle Stevens' Olympic success and her time attending Morgan State University, and get her take on the impact of HBCUs to the black athlete. Make sure to tune into the…
 
Kirk Whalum sits down with hip hop artist Al Kapone and Jazz artist Kandace Springs to talk life, music, spirituality and more in this episode of Humans Being. Hear more about their careers in music, motivation behind their craft, and more. Make sure to catch the latest episodes of Humans Being with Kirk Whalum at kudzukian.com, the Kudzukian App, …
 
On this episode of R&R on Sports, Howard and Larry dive into part 1 of R&R's riveting new series, What if They Committed? We discuss the topic of black athletes' relationship within the NCAA and the potential role HBCUs have. We also get into the hot topics in sports today, so make sure to tune into the latest episodes of R&R on Kudzukian.com or th…
 
On this episode of R&R on Sports, Howard and Larry talk the impact of athlete activism in the aftermath of the Derek Chauvin verdict and we hear from American Sociologist and Civil Rights activist, Dr Harry Edwards. Make sure to tune into this episode and the latest episodes of R&R on Sports on kudzukian.com or by downloading the Kudzukian App.…
 
Kirk Whalum sits down with Jonathan Capehart, renowned journalist to talk politics, music, religion and more in this inaugural episode of Humans Being. Hear more about their world travels, navigating new languages, plus we get their initial reactions to the Derek Chauvin verdict from the George Floyd case. Make sure to catch the latest episodes of …
 
On this episode of R&R on Sports, Howard and Larry talk the recent hiring of big time names at HBCUs and the impact it can have on the future of sports at HBCUs. We also hear from HBCU legend Ed "Too Tall" Jones. Make sure to tune into this episode and the latest episodes of R&R on Sports on kudzukian.com or by downloading the Kudzukian App.…
 
On March 31, Toni Morrison wins the Pulitzer. She was an American novelist, essayist, book editor, and college professor. In the late 1960s, Morrison became the first Black female editor in fiction at Random House in New York City. She became noted for her examination of the Black experience within the Black community. In 1988, Morrison won the Pul…
 
On March 30, The 15th Amendment was ratified and gave blacks the right to vote. In the final years of the American Civil War and the Reconstruction Era that followed, Congress repeatedly debated the rights of the millions who had been enslaved. After surviving a difficult ratification fight, the amendment was certified as duly ratified and part of …
 
Wilma Rudolph was an American sprinter, who became a world-record-holding Olympic champion and international icon in track and field. Rudolph was born prematurely at 4.5 pounds (2.0 kg) on June 23, 1940, in Saint Bethlehem, Tennessee. She was able to overcome several early childhood illnesses, including pneumonia, scarlet fever and polio. She enrol…
 
March 29 is the birthday of Pearl Bailey. She was an American entertainer notable for her sultry singing and mischievous humor. A nightclub performer, Bailey shared the stage with entertainers such as Cab Calloway and Duke Ellington. Bailey also had a television career and even hosted her own show, “The Pearl Bailey Show.” BlackFacts.com is the Int…
 
Diane Judith Nash is an American civil rights activist, and a leader and strategist of the student wing of the Civil Rights Movement. Nash was born in 1938 and raised in Chicago. After finishing Hyde Park High School in Chicago, Diane Nash went to Washington, D.C., to attend Howard University. She then went on to major in English at Fisk University…
 
On March 28, Bill Russell became the first African American to coach an NBA team. During his career, Russell supported the American civil rights movement, and spoke out against the Vietnam War. He won 11 NBA titles in the 13 seasons that he played with the Boston Celtics, and then he was named the player-coach of the Celtics in 1966. In 2011, Barac…
 
Marsha P. Johnson was an American gay liberation activist and self-identified drag queen. She was one of the prominent figures in the Stonewall uprising of 1969. She was a founding member of the Gay Liberation Front and co-founded the radical activist group Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (S.T.A.R.). On the early morning hours of June 28…
 
On March 27, the Black Academy of Arts and Letters was founded. Founded in Boston, the Black Academy of Arts and Letters works to promote, cultivate, and preserve the work of African, African-American, and Caribbean artists in the fields of literature, fine arts, performing arts, visual arts, and cinema. The organization grew out of the American Ne…
 
Odetta Holmes was an American singer, actress, guitarist, lyricist, and a civil and human rights activist, often referred to as "The Voice of the Civil Rights Movement". Odetta was born in Birmingham, Alabama, on December 31, 1930. As an important figure in the American folk music of the 50s and 60s, she influenced many of the key figures of the fo…
 
On March 26, William H. Hastie became the first Black federal judge. After graduating with a degree in mathematics from Amherst College in 1925, Hastie taught at the Bordentown Manual School before going on to Harvard University to receive a law degree in 1930. He began his federal career as a solicitor for the Department of the Interior in 1933. U…
 
Marian Anderson was an American contralto. She performed a wide range of music, from opera to spirituals. Anderson was born in Philadelphia on February 27, 1897. On January 7, 1955, Anderson became the first African-American to perform at the Metropolitan Opera. During her life, she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Congressional G…
 
March 25 is the Birthday of Aretha Franklin. As a young teen, Franklin performed with her father on his gospel programs in major cities throughout the country and was recognized as a vocal prodigy. She moved to New York City, where Columbia Records executive John Hammond arranged her recording contract. Her first recording session where she sang “T…
 
Mahalia Jackson, born Mahala Jackson, was an American gospel singer, widely considered one of the most influential vocalists of the 20th century. As a child, Mahalia found a home in her church, where Mahalia delivered God's word through song. She moved to Chicago as an adolescent and joined the Johnson Singers, one of the earliest gospel groups. Ja…
 
Halle Berry became the first African American woman to win an Oscar for Best Actress. Film roles in "Jungle Fever" (1991), directed by Spike Lee, and in "Boomerang" (1992), directed by Reginald Hudlin, first brought her notice. She won an Oscar for Best Actress for her performance in "Monster's Ball"(2001), becoming the first African-American woman…
 
On March 23, Patricia Roberts Harris passed away. She was the first African American woman named to a U.S. ambassadorship and the first as well to serve in a presidential cabinet. In 1963, President John F. Kennedy appointed her co-chairman of the National Women's Committee for Civil Rights. She worked in Lyndon Johnson's presidential campaign. Soo…
 
Condoleezza "Condi" Rice, born on November 14, 1954 in Birmingham, Alabama, is an American diplomat, political scientist, civil servant, and professor who is the current director of the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. In President Bush's second term, she succeeded Colin Powell as Secretary of State. She was the second female secretary of…
 
March 22 is the Birthday of George Benson In the late 1960s he sat in on Miles Davis' "Miles in the Sky sessions," and also put a personal spin on the tunes from the Beatles' "Abbey Road." Benson has won ten Grammy Awards and often plays the dual role of expert improviser and vibrant entertainer. Rounding out his singular approach with a strong sen…
 
Barbara Charline Jordan was an American lawyer, educator and leader in the Civil Rights Movement. She was the first African American elected to the Texas Senate after Reconstruction. She won a seat in the Texas Senate in 1966, becoming the first African-American state senator since 1883 and the first Black woman to serve in that legislative body. P…
 
On March 21, James Baskett becomes the first African American to win an Academy Award. He was an American actor and singer, known for his portrayal of Uncle Remus in the 1946 Disney animated feature film "Song of the South." Baskett became the first live actor to be hired by Walt Disney. In recognition of his portrayal of the famous black storytell…
 
Lena Mary Calhoun Horne was an American singer, dancer, actress, and civil rights activist. Horne's career spanned over 70 years, appearing in film, television, and theatre. In the fall of 1933, Horne joined the chorus line of the Cotton Club in New York City. She made her debut at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in Panama Hattie (1942). She was at the March o…
 
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