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This podcast is devoted to all things gardening. National gardening television host, Joe Lamp'l, guides you through each episode with practical tips and information to help you become a better, smarter gardener, no matter where you are on your journey. This series has a strong emphasis on organic gardening and growing food, but covers a diverse range of topics from one of the country's most informed and leading gardening personalities today.
 
This weekly podcast series is for people who love to garden and spend time outdoors and who really care about environmental stewardship. Hosted by Joe Lamp?l, national gardening television personality and author of The Green Gardener's Guide, Joe shares his unique, insiders perspective with NPR style stories, interviews with nationally acclaimed experts, answers listener's questions and offers useful tips, all in a fresh, insightful and entertaining way.
 
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As gardeners, if we get stuck in our ways, we can’t grow. I love the fact that there is always more to learn when it comes to gardening and that we can push ourselves to be better stewards of our land. To discuss many of the lessons she learned this past year, my friend and guest this week is Margaret Roach, gardening columnist for The New York Tim…
 
Being an ever-better gardener means staying open to change. As long as we've both been gardening, my friend Joe Lamp'l was saying to me the other day, we're still evolving, still learning lessons every single growing season. We were comparing notes on the phone about the season we just each put to bed, Joe in Atlanta and me up north in New York Sta…
 
The other night I hosted an online class about shade gardening, featuring Ken Druse, whom I met in 1992-ish, almost exactly 30 years ago to the day, when I interviewed him on the publication of his book “The Natural Shade Garden.” In 2015, Ken wrote a whole new shade book appropriately called “The New Shade Garden,” so I guess you can tell that sha…
 
Did you maybe get or give a cookbook or two for a holiday gift? Well, hopefully you can make room on the shelf for another couple of good ones. Our expert guide who's been browsing and cooking from the latest crop is Alexandra Stafford, aka Ali, who has some goodies to share—perfect fodder for another January of sticking close to home as I know a l…
 
As we seek to not only stop but reverse wildlife loss and the effects of climate change, going organic is not enough. We need to adopt regenerative practices that provide opportunities for nature to heal. To speak to how we can all participate in changing the world, one garden at a time, my guest this week is gardener and author Emily Murphy.…
 
Uh-oh, now I've learned that there's another plant I didn't think I could grow in my Northern garden, but it sounds like I can. Hello, Crinum lilies, you gorgeous size-XL bulbs that I thought were the domain of Southern gardeners only, and not for me. A new book about them by Jenks Farmer is teaching me otherwise, and making me want to order some b…
 
Not everyone has a yard where they can start a garden, which is exactly why my guest this week, Acadia Tucker, wrote her book, Tiny Victory Gardens, including lots of tips on growing food without a yard. Acadia is a farmer, writer and climate activist who promotes gardening methods that increase food resiliency, feed pollinators and draw down carbo…
 
"To discover and share knowledge about plants and their environment in order to preserve and enrich life." – Missouri Botanical Garden mission Founded in 1859, the Missouri Botanical Garden is the nation's oldest botanical garden in continuous operation and a National Historic Landmark. The Garden is a center for botanical research and science educ…
 
Taking care of a property for many years and watching the plants that you put in the ground mature and flourish is one of the most satisfying parts of gardening, but sometimes circumstances require us to leave our beloved gardens behind. My guest this week, garden designer and acclaimed writer Page Dickey, shares her journey and growth from startin…
 
While many people understand that native plants are important, there's often a gap in understanding what pollinators rely on them. Understanding how to attract, observe and identify these essential insects is vital to our role in helping promote biological diversity within the species. To help us understand more about this important topic, my guest…
 
When Ken Druse and I talked on the program a couple of weeks ago about putting our tools away for the winter, all cleaned and oiled, one part we failed to mention: We're both eyeing some new tools, too, for the year ahead. All of them would make great gifts, we think, so that's today's topic: stuff we love or covet, for gifting or treating yourself…
 
Peat moss plays a big role in the horticulture industry and for home gardeners. But when it comes to sustainability and climate change, peat moss may not a great choice for our gardening endeavors. To discuss the challenges of its ongoing use in the face of climate change, my guest this week is Dr. Merritt Turetsky, a wetland ecologist and the “Que…
 
I'm eyeing a vintage glass cookie jar I haven't used in years, and a big glass snifter, too, that's been sitting idle on a shelf in the sideboard for ages. And I'm thinking terrariums, and I'm thinking holiday centerpiece, or maybe a gift or two. Are you feeling crafty? Today's guest has expert how-to and design help for creating tiny landscapes un…
 
For centuries, the objective of gardening has been to tame the wild, and that led to many horticultural practices that are disastrous for wildlife and the ecosystem at large. The objective of ecological gardening, a new movement, is to create beautiful spaces in concert with nature rather than trying to overcome nature. To explain the value of ecol…
 
Some of the most beautiful and intricate creatures in the garden are not plants at all. A diversity of lichens are showing off right now on tree bark and branches, on stones, on unpainted garden furniture and even soil, more visible since many of the garden's plants have quieted down visually for their dormant season. Let's go on a virtual lichen w…
 
Grow bags are a convenient solution for gardeners who are short on space, but every gardener can enjoy the benefits of grow bags. In this week’s episode, I answer all your questions on gardening in grow bags, including all the advantages as well as the challenges and how to overcome them. We polled our social media followers recently on what they w…
 
Author Marta McDowell, a gardener and landscape designer in contemporary New Jersey, has an enduring passion for digging into history, particularly into noted authors and their gardens—what she calls the “connection between the pen and the trowel.” She's written books from that vantage point on Emily Dickinson, Beatrix Potter and Laura Ingalls Wild…
 
Propagating native plants from seeds protects genetic diversity and is simple to do. To discuss all the benefits and the steps for the easiest way to grow native seeds in winter (no special equipment required) is my guest this week, Heather McCargo, the executive director of the Wild Seed Project.By Podcast – joe gardener® | Organic Gardening Like a Pro
 
It's been a strangely mild fall so far in the Northeast, where Ken Druse and I both garden. But as some recent overnight freezes served as a reminder: Get the must-do chores done or else, because who knows when the weather will lower the boom for good. On our lists, still: collecting some seeds of natives to sow later and cleaning and preparing too…
 
The more we learn about the importance of biodiversity and the harms of monoculture, pesticides and synthetic fertilizer, the more we realize that sprawling lawns should be phased out. Here to explain the simple steps to converting lawn into an ecologically fundamental meadow is Owen Wormser, an expert in regenerative landscape design.…
 
Designer David Culp sees the garden in layers, but not just the most obvious landscape ones most of us do—meaning the canopy, the shrub layer and ground-covering plants. His view of the garden is more like 3D chess and then some: layers of color, texture, shape, and even the layer of time. He's here to offer us advice for looking at our garden’s ma…
 
Brooklyn Bridge Park is a shining example of ecological horticulture at work and its many benefits. To continue our conversation on how it works and practical ways to apply ecological horticulture at home, Rebecca McMackin is back for Part II of this important discussion.By Podcast – joe gardener® | Organic Gardening Like a Pro
 
When I saw news of a popular new garden book called “The Heirloom Gardener,” I thought it would be about growing vegetables or flowers of old-time, open-pollinated varieties maybe. You know: of heirlooms. But John Forti's latest book is about much more, about not just traditional plants, but traditional practices, too, that serve to connect us to t…
 
Ecological horticulture is one of the most important methodologies that gardeners can adopt to combat the loss of biodiversity, but the term is still unfamiliar to many. To explain ecological horticulture and how to practice it, my guest this week is self-described “ecologically obsessed” director of horticulture at Brooklyn Bridge Park, Rebecca Mc…
 
What are the forward-looking steps in your fall garden routine—the most important tasks you take now to get your garden tucked in, that really focus on success next year? Over at the part-farm, par-garden of Lee Reich in the Hudson Valley of New York State, his emphasis is on building soil health, and also on stashing his tender potted figs, so the…
 
Adding a cutting garden to your landscape will mean fresh-cut flowers for you to enjoy and also an abundance of pollinators and other beneficial insects in your vegetable garden. To explain why vegetables love flowers and how to start a cutting garden, my guest this week is flower farmer and author Lisa Mason Ziegler. With Lisa’s tips, you'll be re…
 
"What do you want to talk about when we tape our next podcast segment, I asked Ken Druse the other day, and his answer was succinct. "Monocots," he said. To which I said, "What?" "I want to talk about monocotyledons," he said, using the unabbreviated name of one of the two groups that all flowering plants fit into, the other being dicots. And so we…
 
As much as we love watching monarch butterflies fluttering in our gardens and landing on flowers to sip nectar, there is much about monarchs that remains a mystery to both gardeners and scientists. My guest this week, Nancy Lawson, is part of a new citizen science project named Monarch Rx, and she’s here to explain an unexpected way that gardeners …
 
Have you made room in the compost heap for all that incoming organic material about to be created during your fall cleanup? Compost is today's topic with Associate Director Cary Oshins of the US Composting Council. And we'll talk about everything from best how-to practices to improve your results, to all those claims about compostable plastic bags …
 
Starting a food forest may sound like it requires more space than many of us have to work with, but the reality is even gardeners with small yards can implement this permaculture growing method. To share food forest methods and principles, my guest this week is Darrell Frey, a sustainable design expert.…
 
I'm always looking for more places to tuck native plantings, and my current mission is along my property edges, where I'm adding a more complex layer of shrubs and small trees adjacent to the big old canopy-level ones to increase habitat for beneficial insects and birds, in particular. I've been turning to today's guest for suggestions, and now we …
 
Growing garlic in the home garden opens up the opportunity to experience an array of flavors that you will never find with store-bought garlic. Growing garlic is easy, but there are a few important things to know to have success. To share his expert advice on growing great garlic, my guest this week is Alley Swiss of Filaree Farm in Washington.…
 
I've been scouting around in my garden for orphaned plants, ones that used to be in visually pleasing clumps or masses, but because of expanding shade or a naughty vole or who knows what, aren't looking as good as they used to. Over in New Jersey, Ken Druse has been digging and dividing some perennials, too, but for different reasons. And that's ou…
 
We gardeners, whether we grow ornamentals or vegetables, often run into conflict with wildlife that wants to eat what we grow. To share methods that we can employ to overcome critter issues in a humane way, my guest this week is Nancy Lawson, the founder of The Humane Gardener as we discuss how to nurture a backyard habitat for wildlife.…
 
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