show episodes
 
For several decades, researchers based at the University of Oxford have been addressing one of the most compelling human stories; why and how people move. Combining the expertise of the Centre on Migration Policy and Society, the Refugee Studies Centre, Border Criminologies in the Department of Law, the Transport Studies Unit in the School of Geography and the Environment, and scholars working on migration and mobility from across divisions and departments, the University has one the largest ...
  continue reading
 
Since coming on the market over a decade ago, e-cigarettes have divided opinion. A team of Oxford researchers are searching for new e-cigarette studies every month. In this podcast, Dr Jamie Hartmann-Boyce and Dr Nicola Lindson talk about what has been found, and how this changes what we know about e-cigarettes. This podcast is made possible through funding from Cancer Research UK. Art work by Olivia Barratier. Produced by Dr Ailsa Butler.
  continue reading
 
Historian and broadcaster Professor Adam Smith explores the America of today through the lens of the past. Is America - as Abraham Lincoln once claimed - the last best hope of Earth? Produced by Oxford University’s world-leading Rothermere American Institute, each story-filled episode looks at the US from the outside in – delving into the political events, conflicts, speeches and songs that have shaped and embodied the soul of a nation. From the bloody battlefields of Gettysburg to fake news ...
  continue reading
 
The Tibetan Graduates Studies Seminar (TGSS) is a weekly series of colloquia and guest lectures at the Oriental Institute. The intended purpose of the TGSS is to give MPhil and DPhil candidates a platform to present their work-in-progress and receive feedback from staff and affiliated scholars of the field. Additionally, the weekly time slot will also allow visiting scholars to present their current research. They are provided with the opportunity to engage in similar ways with both students ...
  continue reading
 
Welcome to Middle East Centre Booktalk – the Oxford podcast on new books about the Middle East. These are some of the books written by members of our community, or the books our community are talking about. Tune in to follow author interviews and book chat. Every episode features a different, recently published book and is hosted by a different Oxford academic.
  continue reading
 
Artwork
 
The Voltaire Foundation is a world leader for eighteenth-century scholarship, publishing the definitive edition of the Complete Works of Voltaire (Œuvres complètes de Voltaire), as well as Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment (previously SVEC), the foremost series devoted to Enlightenment studies, and the correspondences of several key French thinkers.
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
Oxford Education Podcast

Oxford University Press

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
This podcast brings together educational experts to discuss key issues in primary and secondary education. Enjoy fascinating insights and get practical tips to apply to your teaching. Brought to you by the Schools Team at Oxford University Press.
  continue reading
 
Artwork
 
Welcome to Oxford Political Thought - the Oxford podcast where each week guest speakers working on Islam, politics, and history to discuss their cutting-edge research on political thought. Our guests will each speak for 20mins, one after the other and a Q&A discussion will follow. The series convenors are Professor Faisal Devji (St Antony's College, University of Oxford) and Dr Usaama al-Azami (Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford).
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
72 Weeks

New College, Oxford

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Produced by New College, Oxford, 72 Weeks details how life can change, and indeed has changed, for people over the course of an Oxford University degree. Each episode focuses on a different theme, with guests having some form of commonality.
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
The Romanes Lecture

Oxford University

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
The Romanes Lecture is an annual public lecture at Oxford University. The first was given in 1892 by William Gladstone. Subsequent speakers have included Theodore Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, Sir Isaiah Berlin, Iris Murdoch, Edward Heath, AJP Taylor, Tony Blair and Sir Paul Nurse.
  continue reading
 
Artwork

1
Voices from Oxford

Oxford University

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Voices from Oxford features interviews with staff and students at the University. The inspiration for Voices from Oxford came from Alastair Cooke's famous 'Letter from America', broadcast for many years by the BBC. Like that programme, we take an event, a story, or a person in the news and build a broadcast around that.
  continue reading
 
A concise and original introduction to a wide range of subjects—from Public Health to Buddhist Ethics, Soft Matter to Classics, and Art History to Globalization—by the expert authors of the Very Short Introductions series. For wherever your curiosity may take you.
  continue reading
 
A series of lectures looking at China's rapidly-changing economy and society, from the China Policy Forum organised by OXCEP at St Edmund Hall. The speakers examine four highly-topical policy issues: technology and industrial upgrading policies; policies against poverty; policies for the ageing population; and the economic causes and cures of social instability.
  continue reading
 
The Healthcare Values Partnership is led by Professor Joshua Hordern of the University of Oxford who collaborates with a range of colleagues in Oxford and elsewhere. The ethos of the partnership is to develop working relationships between patients, researchers, healthcare practitioners, managers and policy makers to explore questions of value in healthcare today. We welcome new conversations and partners who share this focus. http://www.healthcarevalues.ox.ac.uk
  continue reading
 
Does Religion Lead to Tolerance or Intolerance? An international three-day conference in Oxford, organised by the Science and Religious Conflict Project team. It is an interdisciplinary conference on the theme of empirically informed approaches to understanding the ways in which religion increases or decreases tolerance.
  continue reading
 
Artwork
 
The Faculty of English Language and Literature is by far the largest English Department in the UK, with over 75 permanent postholders, a further 70 Faculty members, 900 undergraduates and 300 postgraduates. The Faculty has a very distinguished research and teaching record, covering all periods of English Literature. This series includes talks from the English Faculty Open days.
  continue reading
 
Each lecture in this series focuses on a single play by Shakespeare, and employs a range of different approaches to try to understand a central critical question about it. Rather than providing overarching readings or interpretations, the series aims to show the variety of different ways we might understand Shakespeare, the kinds of evidence that might be used to strengthen our critical analysis, and, above all, the enjoyable and unavoidable fact that Shakespeare's plays tend to generate our ...
  continue reading
 
In this series aimed at new students at Oxford we offer some insights and advice from current students reflecting on their own experiences at the University. The material will be relevant to all new starters but of particular value to new students from outside the UK.
  continue reading
 
These online audio resources consist of lectures, seminars and interviews from the Environmental Change Institute at Oxford University. Topics include: climate change, energy, tropical forestry, environmental governance and general topics related to environmental change.
  continue reading
 
Loading …
show series
 
What drives trust in news and how do different audiences think about this. In this final episode of our Digital News Report 2024 series, we look at a complex and often controversial subject which is trust in news. We look at what trust in news means, how this varies by different audiences and socio-economic status, and what factors drive trust in n…
  continue reading
 
Why does official data tell us so little about migration? Why do some migration statistics seem to clash? How can we shape this “age of migration data” for better? We welcome co-authors of Improving Migration Data for People and the Planet to this latest episode.The global number of international migrants is estimated at 281 million, but surprising…
  continue reading
 
What explains the rise of news influencers and who are the most popular? In this episode of our Digital News Report 2024 podcast series, we look at the rise of news influencers, the platforms where they are prevalent and why some audiences are flocking to them. We look at which figures people pay attention to most and what it means for traditional …
  continue reading
 
We caught with up with one of Wadham's newest Fellows, Shumiao Ouyang to discuss his wide-ranging research at the intersection of finance and tech. This podcast is a snippet from that conversation that expands on the impact of mobile payment apps, and joyfully explores related tangents. Find out whether Wadham's Comms assistant is irrational for st…
  continue reading
 
Robert Mayer's analysis of Guru Chowang's enduring connection between territorial deity cosmologies and the preservation of hidden teachings in Tibetan Buddhism Academic scholars are accustomed to understanding gter as sacred texts often associated with Padmasambhava, within a cult deriving historically from ancient imperial burials. Yet the great …
  continue reading
 
Kristin Scheible uncovers the hidden role of nāgas in defining Buddhist treasures and explores their surprising significance in safeguarding sacred relics through early texts Much of the literature on nāgas in Indian Buddhist monasticism has focused on their rain-making and monastery-protecting duties. However, early Buddhist texts are full of narr…
  continue reading
 
How much money are people paying for news around the world? In this episode of our Digital News Report 2024 podcast series, we look at how much money people pay for news and how this compares to the ‘full ticket’ price. We look at payment trends around the world, the various ways news organisations price their subscriptions, and how much non-subscr…
  continue reading
 
Jamie Hartmann-Boyce and Nicola Lindson discuss emerging evidence in e-cigarette research interview Louise Ross from the National Centre for Smoking Cessation and Training (NCSCT). Associate Professor Jamie Hartmann-Boyce and Associate Professor Nicola Lindson discuss the new evidence in e-cigarette research and interview Louise Ross from the Natio…
  continue reading
 
What do news audiences actually say they want from news? In this episode of our Digital News Report 2024 series, we look at what people say they want from news. Do audiences want more than to just be informed and updated? Are they looking to be entertained or inspired? We speak to an author of the DNR who has explored this issue in a special chapte…
  continue reading
 
In this episode of our Digital News Report 2024 series, we explore what people think about the use of AI in journalism. In this episode of our Digital News Report 2024 series, we explore what people think about the use of AI in journalism. We look at how AI is being used in newsrooms, levels of comfort that people have with AI and journalism, and q…
  continue reading
 
For as long as there have been elections, there have been those who’ve refused to trust them. But anxiety about elections has peaked at particular moments in American history – in the run-up the Civil War, in the late nineteenth century, in the Civil Rights era, and again today. All periods when sections of the population became convinced that the …
  continue reading
 
In this opening episode of our series, we’ll explore the key findings from our Digital News Report 2024, the most comprehensive study of news consumption worldwide. In this opening episode of our series, we’ll explore the key findings from our Digital News Report 2024, the most comprehensive study of news consumption worldwide. We will discuss some…
  continue reading
 
In 1787, the year of the Constitutional Convention, Thomas Jefferson wrote that if he had to choose between “a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter”. Easy for him to say – but in reality, US presidents and the press have always been locked in an embrace fusing mutual r…
  continue reading
 
Jamie Hartmann-Boyce and Nicola Lindson discuss emerging evidence in e-cigarette research interview Andrea Villanti. Associate Professor Jamie Hartmann-Boyce and Associate Professor Nicola Lindson discuss the new evidence in e-cigarette research and interview Associate Professor Andrea Villanti, Department of Health Behavior, Society, and Policy, R…
  continue reading
 
At the heart of the "promise" of the American Revolution and the new republic's claim to be the last, best hope of earth, is the assertion in the Declaration of Independence that "all men are created equal". How did Black Americans react to the Declaration? How did they seek to shape the character of the new Republic? And what was the relationship …
  continue reading
 
Book Launch for "The Damascus Events: the 1860 Massacre and the Destruction of the Old Ottoman World" By Eugene Rogan, Published in hardback by Allen Lane, 2 May 2024. A watershed moment in the history and the making of the modern Middle East. Renowned Arab scholar, Eugene Rogan brilliantly recreates the lost world of the Middle East under Ottoman …
  continue reading
 
Lindsay BruceAaron WilkesJames BallLiam HallRichard McFahn Hear from our team of experienced Edexcel History teacher-authors as they share their tips and advice on how Oxford’s approach can help students succeed in their Edexcel exams. Aaron Wilkes has over 20 years’ experience working in schools as a teacher, department, and faculty leader. He als…
  continue reading
 
Forty years ago, a twinkly-eyed incumbent president ran for re-election despite concerns about his age. He did so by running a campaign steeped in the idea that America was the last, best hope of earth. Ronald Reagan was no Joe Biden, and no one today expects a landslide victory. Yet there are echoes in today's divided politics in the 1984 election…
  continue reading
 
Professor Ardi Imseis new book explores the UN’s management of the longest-running problem on its agenda, critically assessing tensions between the Organisation’s position and international law. Contrary to conventional wisdom, there has been a continuing though vacillating gulf between the requirements of international law and the United Nations (…
  continue reading
 
How does housing relate to migration and asylum issues? Using the City of Oxford as a case study, we consider the affordability and accessibility of housing to newcomers and the impact this has on refugee and asylum seekers. In this episode of The Migration Oxford Podcast, we explore the ongoing housing affordability and accessibility crisis in the…
  continue reading
 
Jamie Hartmann-Boyce and Nicola Lindson discuss emerging evidence in e-cigarette research interview Jaqueline Avila. Associate Professor Jamie Hartmann-Boyce and Associate Professor Nicola Lindson discuss the new evidence in e-cigarette research and interview Professor Jaqueline Avila from the Department of Gerontology, University of Massachusetts …
  continue reading
 
Jamie Hartmann-Boyce and Nicola Lindson discuss emerging evidence in e-cigarette research interview Ian Pope. Associate Professor Jamie Hartmann-Boyce and Dr Nicola Lindson discuss the new evidence in e-cigarette research and interview Dr Ian Pope, an emergency medicine physician and honorary associate professor at Norwich Medical School, about his…
  continue reading
 
What makes diaspora communities unique? We learn about the roles of diasporas, contributions to development and humanitarian initiatives across the globe and unpack how people living in diaspora drive change in their communities. In this episode of The Migration Oxford Podcast, we unpack how diaspora communities are partners in development and huma…
  continue reading
 
Jamie Hartmann-Boyce and Nicola Lindson discuss emerging evidence in e-cigarette research interview Reto Auer, Bern University, Switzerland. Associate Professor Jamie Hartmann-Boyce and Dr Nicola Lindson discuss the new evidence in e-cigarette research and interview Professor Reto Auer, primary care physician and clinical researcher from the Instit…
  continue reading
 
Cricket was once the most popular summer game in the United States – the first ever international match was played not, as you might expect between England and one of its colonies, but between Canada and the United States, in 1844. The first overseas England tour was to the US in 1859. The professional players earned the unheard-of sum of 90 pounds…
  continue reading
 
Presidential primaries – the circus that has traditionally wended its way from Iowa to New Hampshire and beyond every four years -- is one of the most distinctive features of American political life. From the insurgent campaigns of Jimmy Carter in 1976 to Barack Obama in 2008 and even Donald Trump in 2016, primaries have enabled the rise of politic…
  continue reading
 
Intersections of art and activism are used as a tool to promote diversity, address human rights and make calls to action in contexts of migration. What is artivism and how can it support individuals to tell their own stories? In this episode of The Migration Oxford Podcast, we discuss the role of artivism as a tool to promote diversity in contexts …
  continue reading
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide