show episodes
 
Lectures on international law issues by eminent scholars, practitioners and judges of national and international courts. The lecture series is brought to you by the Public International Law Discussion Group, part of the Law Faculty of the University of Oxford, and is supported by the British Branch of the International Law Association and Oxford University Press. Further details of this series can be found on the Public International Law -https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/research-subject-groups/grad ...
 
A selection of seminars and special lectures on wide-ranging topics relating to practical ethics. The Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics was established in 2002 with the support of the Uehiro Foundation on Ethics and Education of Japan. It is an integral part of the philosophy faculty of Oxford University, one of the great centres of academic excellence in philosophical ethics.
 
Since coming on the market over a decade ago, e-cigarettes have divided opinion. A team of Oxford researchers are searching for new e-cigarette studies every month. In this podcast, Dr Jamie Hartmann-Boyce and Dr Nicola Lindson talk about what has been found, and how this changes what we know about e-cigarettes. This podcast is made possible through funding from Cancer Research UK. Art work by Olivia Barratier. Produced by Dr Ailsa Butler.
 
For several decades, researchers based at the University of Oxford have been addressing one of the most compelling human stories; why and how people move. Combining the expertise of the Centre on Migration Policy and Society, the Refugee Studies Centre, Border Criminologies in the Department of Law, and researchers involved in the multidisciplinary Migration and Mobility Network, the University has one the largest concentrations of migration researchers in the world. We all come together at ...
 
From Oxford University's Rothermere American Institute, host Professor Adam Smith talks to guests doing world-leading research that sheds light on the United States from the outside in. We ask what forces have shaped the culture and politics of the US, how its role in the world has changed and what it might be in the future. Is America now, or has it ever been, the "last best hope of earth"? Probably not, but plenty of people have thought so. We try to understand why.
 
Leadership2050 is a podcast exploring the leadership we need to successfully transition to 2050. Who are the innovators setting the agenda for a more equal and sustainable future? In this series you’ll meet them. In each episode Andrew White talks to a visionary leader from the business community who is confronting the challenges humanity faces and finding solutions.
 
Voices from Oxford features interviews with staff and students at the University. The inspiration for Voices from Oxford came from Alastair Cooke's famous 'Letter from America', broadcast for many years by the BBC. Like that programme, we take an event, a story, or a person in the news and build a broadcast around that.
 
The Healthcare Values Partnership is led by Professor Joshua Hordern of the University of Oxford who collaborates with a range of colleagues in Oxford and elsewhere. The ethos of the partnership is to develop working relationships between patients, researchers, healthcare practitioners, managers and policy makers to explore questions of value in healthcare today. We welcome new conversations and partners who share this focus. http://www.healthcarevalues.ox.ac.uk
 
The Department of Statistics at Oxford is a world leader in research including computational statistics and statistical methodology, applied probability, bioinformatics and mathematical genetics. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Oxford's Mathematical Sciences submission was ranked overall best in the UK. This is an exciting time for the Department. We have now moved into our new home on St Giles and we are currently settling in. The new building provides improved lecture and ...
 
Welcome to the Oxford Adult ESL Conversations podcast, hosted by Jayme Adelson-Goldstein, co-author of the Oxford Picture Dictionary and series director of the new Step Forward Second Edition. In this podcast series, Jayme is joined by Adult ESL educators, thought leaders, and advocates for candid conversations about topics important to teachers in this dynamic field.
 
Every object in the Ashmolean has passed from hand to hand to reach the Museum. In a new podcast, we uncover the invisible fingerprints left behind by makers, looters, archaeologists, soldiers, rulers, curators, and many more. These stories of touch reveal the ways in which the forces of conflict and colonialism have shaped Britain’s oldest Museum. Join the Ashmolean’s curators alongside artists, experts, and community members. Fingerprints will be released on the Ashmolean’s website, on Spo ...
 
The Africa Oxford Initiative (AfOx) is a cross-university platform for all things Africa in Oxford. The overarching vision of AfOx is to make Africa a strategic priority for the University of Oxford, while also building equitable research collaborations between researchers and academics from African institutions and the University of Oxford. Throughout the year AfOx hosts several events and workshops about Africa-focussed research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines. T ...
 
In a series of 5-minute interviews, academic staff at Oxford talk about how they use technology for teaching and learning. What are the different types of teaching taking place at Oxford? How can technology play a part in enriching the experience of students? How can academics create a space for their students to explore? Learning technologies and techniques like: 3D printing; Canvas @ Oxford and the Weblearn virtual learning environment (VLE); formative and summative assessment; collaborati ...
 
A one day conference showcasing the wide variety of research and projects being undertaken by Academics under the Humanities Division at the University of Oxford. From Philosophy and Neuroscience to Politics and International Relations to Literary Analysis and the History of Ideas, Oxford's Humanities Division crosses departments and subjects in its research goals.
 
Oxford Transitional Justice Research (OTJR) is an inter-disciplinary network of more than 100 Oxford staff and students working broadly on issues of transition in societies recovering from mass conflict and/or repressive rule. OTJR is dedicated to producing high-quality scholarship that connects intimately to practical and policy questions in transitional justice, focusing on the following themes: Prosecutions, Truth Commissions, Local and traditional practices, Compensation and reparations, ...
 
The Voltaire Foundation is a world leader for eighteenth-century scholarship, publishing the definitive edition of the Complete Works of Voltaire (Œuvres complètes de Voltaire), as well as Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment (previously SVEC), the foremost series devoted to Enlightenment studies, and the correspondences of several key French thinkers.
 
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show series
 
In this episode, Elizabeth Fisher introduces environmental law, a wide-ranging area of law that can operate at both a local and global level and is an area of complexity and hard-fought cases. Learn more about “Environmental Law: A Very Short Introduction” here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/environmental-law-a-very-short-introduction-978…
 
The Dust Bowl: the ecological disaster within the larger disaster of the Great Depression. It’s a story that generations of Americans have come to know through John Steinbeck's classic novel, The Grapes of Wrath and Dorothea Lange's unforgettable photos of migrant families struggling on the road to make a living in Depression-torn California. In th…
 
In this episode of the Migration Oxford Podcast, we ask if the 1951 Refugee Convention is under attack. As states look for ways to avoid taking responsibility for refugees and asylum seekers, such as the UK's "Migration and Economic Development Partnership with Rwanda". Is the Convention still the right tool, and how can the protection it offers re…
 
In this St Cross Special Ethics Seminar, Dr Brian Earp argues that all medically unnecessary genital cutting of non-consenting persons should be opposed on moral and legal grounds. Defenders of male circumcision increasingly argue that female ‘circumcision’ (ritual cutting of the clitoral hood or labia) should be legally allowed in Western liberal …
 
In this episode, Catherine Wilson introduces Epicureanism, a school of thought based on the teachings of Epicurus, that promotes modest pleasure and a simple life—ideals that still hold relevance today. Learn more about “Epicureanism: A Very Short Introduction” here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/epicureanism-a-very-short-introduction-978…
 
Fiona Fox of the Science Media Centre discusses how her organisation works to improve the relationship between scientists and journalists to ensure accurate, evidence-based information around topical scientific issues reaches the public. Speaker: Fiona Fox, Chief Executive of the Science Media CentreHost: Rasmus Nielsen, Director of the Reuters Ins…
 
In this episode, Philip Dwyer introduces the difficult but important topic of violence and addresses the truth behind the claims that society is becoming less violent. Learn more about “Violence: A Very Short Introduction” here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/violence-a-very-short-introduction-9780198831730 Philip Dwyer is Professor of His…
 
In episode 6, Andrew talks to modern mystic Thomas Hübl about the business benefits of personal spiritual work and trauma-informed leadership. Thomas Hübl is a renowned teacher and author whose work integrates ancient wisdom with the discoveries of science. He is the founder of the Academy of Inner Science, which studies the principles of human inn…
 
On 3 May each year, the world marks Press Freedom Day to show support for journalists whose ability to report freely is curtailed through harassment and intimidation, physical and online threats, financial and legal pressures. For this episode of our podcast, we speak to two Journalist Fellows, Paula Molina from Chile and Maurice Oniang'o from Keny…
 
In this episode, Charlotte Gordon introduces Mary Shelley, an author known for the seminal Frankenstein but whose body of work extends beyond one novel. Learn more about “Mary Shelley: A Very Short Introduction” here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/mary-shelley-a-very-short-introduction-9780198869191 Charlotte Gordon is the Distinguished P…
 
In episode 5, Andrew talks to circular economy pioneer Jessica Long about the big idea that’s revolutionising business, and what it takes to be a great leader. For more than two decades Jessica has been helping organisations increase their competitiveness and drive profitable growth while creating positive economic, environmental and societal impac…
 
Jamie Hartmann-Boyce and Nicola Lindson discuss emerging evidence in e-cigarette research and interview Alex Liber. In the April episode Jamie Hartmann-Boyce talks with Assistant Professor Alex Liber, Department of Oncology at Georgetown University's School of Medicine, Washington DC, USA. Alex Liber discusses his work at the intersection between m…
 
On today’s episode, we’re commemorating National DNA Day in the United States by considering the role that DNA plays in our society. First, we welcome Amber Hartman Scholz, co-author of the article “Myth-busting the provider-user relationship for digital sequence information”, looking at how genetic resources are actually used and shared across the…
 
In this episode, Rana Mitter introduces modern China, a country full of contradictions that continues to make global headlines as it balances its past with its future. Learn more about “Modern China: A Very Short Introduction” here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/modern-china-a-very-short-introduction-9780198753704 Rana Mitter is Professor…
 
In episode 4, Andrew talks to Paul Polman, one of the world’s leading proponents of sustainable capitalism, about using business to drive positive global transformation. Paul has been called one of the standout business leaders of his generation. For ten years as the CEO at Unilever, he helped revolutionise corporate thinking. He proved that puttin…
 
An explanation and discussion of the modern history and recent political developments in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. Piotr Schulkes, Guy Fiennes, and Matthew Smith highlight important topics such as Palestinian refugees, the royal family, and the politics of foreign intervention in the Kingdom.By Piotr Schulkes, Guy Fiennes, Matthew Smith
 
In this episode, Patricia Aufderheide introduces documentary film, a diverse genre that encompasses films from March of the Penguins to Fahrenheit 9/11 but is always rooted in the desire to represent reality. Learn more about “Documentary Film: A Very Short Introduction” here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/documentary-film-a-very-short-in…
 
In episode 3, Andrew talks to Audette Exel, the founder and CEO of the pioneering Adara Group – one of the world’s first businesses for purpose. Audette Exel is not afraid to rip up the rulebook. In fact she’d positively encourage it. Because now is not the time for “business as usual”, and it’s the rebels who are doing things differently. When she…
 
As the controversial Nationality and Borders Bill works its way through parliament in the UK, we investigate Clause 9 which focuses on citizenship deprivation and the rights of the Home Secretary to take somebody's citizenship away. Joined by Zoe Gardner,and Abhishek Saha, we ask who is a citizen, and how can citizenship be taken away? We also look…
 
In episode 2, Andrew talks to Dr Vivienne Ming, theoretical neuroscientist and AI visionary, about the power of sacrifice, and using science to make a positive difference in the world. Vivienne calls herself a “professional mad scientist” who is dedicated to solving some of the world's most pressing problems. In 2017 she created Socos Labs, which s…
 
A high-level overview of key areas of AI ethics and not-ethics, exploring the challenges of algorithmic decision-making, kinds of bias, and interpretability, linking these issues to problems of human-system interaction. Much attention is now being focused on AI Ethics and Safety, with the EU AI Act and other emerging legislation being proposed to i…
 
A brief introduction to various legal and procedural ethical concepts and their applications within and beyond academia. It's all very well to talk about truth, beauty and justice for academic research ethics. But how do you do these things at a practical level? If you have a big idea, or stumble across something with important implications, what d…
 
This seminar explains and illustrates the approach of Markov melding for joint analysis. Integrating multiple sources of data into a joint analysis provides more precise estimates and reduces the risk of biases introduced by using only partial data. However, it can be difficult to conduct a joint analysis in practice. Instead each data source is ty…
 
Rapid training of deep neural networks without skip connections or normalization layers using Deep Kernel Shaping. Using an extended and formalized version of the Q/C map analysis of Pool et al. (2016), along with Neural Tangent Kernel theory, we identify the main pathologies present in deep networks that prevent them from training fast and general…
 
Professor Denise Lievesley discusses ethical issues and codes of conduct relevant to applied statisticians. Statisticians work in a wide variety of different political and cultural environments which influence their autonomy and their status, which in turn impact on the ethical frameworks they employ. The need for a UN-led fundamental set of princi…
 
Lionel Riou-Durand gives a talk on sampling methods. Sampling approximations for high dimensional statistical models often rely on so-called gradient-based MCMC algorithms. It is now well established that these samplers scale better with the dimension than other state of the art MCMC samplers, but are also more sensitive to tuning. Among these, Ham…
 
Professor Samir Bhatt gives a talk on the mathematics underpinning infectious disease models. Mathematical descriptions of infectious disease outbreaks are fundamental to understanding how transmission occurs. Reductively, two approaches are used: individual based simulators and governing equation models, and both approaches have a multitude of pro…
 
In episode 1 of Series 2, Andrew talks to Toto Wolff, the CEO and Team Principal of the Mercedes-AMG Petronas F1 Team, about life and success in the fast lane. Toto Wolff is perhaps the most powerful man in motorsport. Since he took the helm as Team Principal, the Mercedes Formula One team has achieved an unprecedented seven consecutive World Champ…
 
Jamie Hartmann-Boyce and Nicola Lindson discuss emerging evidence in e-cigarette research and interview Dr Ailsa Butler. Assistant Professor Jamie Hartmann-Boyce and Dr Nicola Lindson talk with Dr Ailsa Butler from the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine, University of Oxford and co-author of the Cochrane review of e-cigarettes for smoking cessation…
 
On today’s episode of The Oxford Comment, we discussed the global and historical implications of women, work, and economic empowerment. First, we welcomed Laura M. Argys and Susan L. Averett, the authors of Women in the Workforce: What Everyone Needs to Know®, to share their research on women’s growing role in the workforce and the problems with de…
 
In Series 2 Andrew White meets six more vanguard leaders – F1 Mercedes boss Toto Wolff; AI visionary Vivienne Ming; former Unilever CEO Paul Polman; entrepreneur and philanthropist Audette Excel; circular economy pioneer Jessica Long; and spiritual leader Thomas Hubl. How are they rethinking business for the 21st century? Leadership2050 is a podcas…
 
We discuss the war on Ukraine and the almost unprecedented speed and size of the movement of people fleeing the country. We discuss the displacement taking place, how refugees are being received in Europe, and the impact this will have on post-EU Britain. In our first ever episode, Rob McNeil and Jacqueline Broadhead of COMPAS (University of Oxford…
 
In this episode, Dennis M. Bier MD and Young Career Editor Kevin C. Klatt, PhD, RD speaks with Dylan McKay, PhD, Assistant Professor of Food and Human Nutritional Sciences at the University of Mannitoba and senior author of the recently published AJCN manuscript, “Genosets for APOE and CYP7A1-rs3808607 variants do not predict LDL cholesterol loweri…
 
In this episode, Jayme is joined by Joy Lehman and Kristi Weisenburger, English language teachers at the Milwaukee Area Technical College in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. They discuss the benefits and challenges of teaching high-flex adult English language classes. This series has … Continue reading →By Jayme Adelson-Goldstein
 
Jamie Hartmann-Boyce and Nicola Lindson discuss emerging evidence in e-cigarette research and interview Professor Billie Bonevski. In this episode Assistant Professor Jamie Hartmann-Boyce and Dr Nicola Lindson discuss the emerging evidence in e-cigarette research and interview Professor Billie Bonevski. This podcast is a companion to the electronic…
 
Philippa Webb, Professor of Public International Law at King’s College London, gives a presentation on recent developments in English law in cases against current and former heads of state. Apologies that there was a brief technical issue shortly after the beginning of this recording.By Philippa Webb
 
Freya Baetens, Professor of Public International Law at Oslo University, gives a presentation on how the International Court of Justice has addressed claims based on ‘regional’ customary international law.By Freya Baetens
 
Fingerprints Episode 6 The country’s first major art and antiquities collection now sits in the Ashmolean Museum. It reveals untold stories from the ancient world including shipwrecks, competitively collecting, underhand dealings and how classical art was used by aristocrats at the royal court to boost their status and standing. Join lecturer Aliso…
 
Black History Month celebrates the achievements of a globally marginalized community still fighting for equal representation and opportunity in all areas of life. This includes education. In 1954, the United States’ Supreme Court ruled “separate but equal” unconstitutional for American public schools in “Brown v. Board of Education.” While this rul…
 
Fingerprints Episode 5 Curator Andrew Shapland shows us a tiny fragment which reveals the story of the man who set out to hunt down the mythical minotaur. Sir Arthur Evans went on to become known as the father of archaeology, but his journey reveals a culture war between empires in the Mediterranean. Find a transcript of this episode here Read more…
 
The Battle Hymn of the Republic is one of the most recognisable songs in the world. Easy to sing, and to march to, its words are stirring and optimistic, and filled with vivid images: trumpets that never call retreat, watch-fires of a hundred circling camps, trampling of the grapes of wrath, loosing of the fateful lightning of the terrible swift sw…
 
Fingerprints Episode 4 Curator Paul Collins takes us on a journey with a 3000 year old king uncovered by an Indian soldier digging a trench in World War I, and explore what he has to tell us about the formation of Iraq as a nation state. Find a transcript of this episode here Read more Read more about the sculpture here or see an image here Speaker…
 
Was Richard Nixon responsible for the rightward turn of the Republican Party, or was he in fact the “the last liberal Republican”? John R. Price, who worked on social policy in Nixon’s White House, has written a book making the case that Nixon has been misunderstood, pointing to plans to reform welfare to introduce something like a universal basic …
 
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