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In Tick, Tick, Boom! Zac Stritch-Hoddle speaks with world-renowned researchers and medical professionals to better understand the mysterious link between tick bites and allergic reactions to mammalian products such as beef and pork. What starts with one doctor’s discovery in a small group of people in Sydney, Australia, goes on to implicate everything from vaccine development, cancer treatment, and a revolutionary change in our understanding of how allergies work.
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The Save Sight Institute

The Save Sight Institute

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The Save Sight Institute conducts research, patient care and teaching. Patients are blind and visually impaired (severely low vision). The Save Sight Institute is a centre of the University of Sydney located on the campus of Sydney Eye Hospital.
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The She Births® Show Podcast

The Birthing Institute 782008

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The She Births® Show is a place that will inspire your birth, evolve your parenting and help you live a life you love. Nadine Richardson, founder of She Births®, hosts a collection of conversations with special guests about better births, a philosophy of connected parenting and conscious, healthy living. Each season includes topics for not only parents and parents-to-be but fellow birth professionals. She Births® is a scientifically verified childbirth education program (BMJ, July 2016). It ...
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My Next Step: College Exploration Spotlight

College & Career Connections @ CMLibrary

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Welcome to Charlotte Mecklenburg Library’s College Exploration Spotlight podcast series! As part of our College & Career Connections initiative, we created these podcasts to help teens learn more about different colleges, universities, and technical schools for local teens to aid in their decision making for their futures. Take a listen to these short, fun and engaging podcasts to help you on your journey!
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Stories in Public Health

Stories in Public Health

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We would like to introduce 'Stories in Public Health', a podcast for new and aspiring public health professionals. Join as we travel around Sydney interviewing the people in public health that we most look up to! Download our podcast and: • Be inspired by public health professionals who are leaders in their fields • Learn about how they got to where they are, and what motivates them to work in public health. • Stay up-to-date with the latest public health practice from the real world and hav ...
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In today’s scientific landscape, artificial intelligence (AI) is revolutionising research methodologies and scientific writing, reshaping how we conduct and disseminate research. As AI’s presence grows, so do questions surrounding ethics, authenticity and the integrity of scientific publications. While AI brings benefits like efficiency and new ide…
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Recently listed among the Top 100 Global Thought Leaders in AI, Marek Kowalkieviczas introduces his latest book, The Economy of Algorithms: AI and the Rise of the Digital Minions. Hear a thought-provoking conversation between Marek and UNSW AI Institute’s Chief Scientist, Scientia Professor Toby Walsh, as they discuss the book's insights, current A…
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In a recent interview, Paul Schrader said he was lucky with Taxi Driver because he “caught the zeitgeist.” He may have done so again with First Reformed (2017), a film that reflects the age of extremism in which we now live. Join us for a long conversation about a person who might be called the “green Travis Bickle” and who trades in one religion f…
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'Star Wars' is a global phenomenon that in 2022 celebrated its 45th year of transmedia storytelling, and it has never been more successful than it is today. More 'Star Wars' works than ever are currently available or in simultaneous development, including live-action and animated series, novels, comics, and merchandise, as well as the feature films…
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Is it possible to come from privilege whilst striving for a fierce socialist agenda? Polly Toynbee believes so. The prolific British Guardian journalist, commentator and broadcaster unpacks what it means to be privileged in Britain and Australia, and whether the deepening class divide can ever be transcended. In an evening of conversation with jour…
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While American television has long relied on a strategic foregrounding of feminist politics to promote certain programming's cultural value, Woman Up: Invoking Feminism in Quality Television (Wayne State University Press, 2022) by Dr. Julia Havas is the first sustained critical analysis of the twenty-first-century resurgence of this tradition. In W…
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Hobson’s Choice (1954) is the perfect example of a very specific genre: the capitalist romance. Filled with a Dickensian love of humanity and featuring one of Charles Laughton’s best performances, it’s a perfect film about a deeply complicated topic: what makes the world go round and how individual family units come together, function, and roll on.…
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Herman J. (1897–1953) and Joseph L. Mankiewicz (1909–1993) wrote, produced, and directed over 150 pictures. With Orson Welles, Herman wrote the screenplay for Citizen Kane and shared the picture’s only Academy Award. Joe earned the second pair of his four Oscars for writing and directing All About Eve, which also won Best Picture. In The Brothers M…
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The astonishing behind-the-scenes story of the 1963 film Cleopatra and how it changed the face of Hollywood makes it one of the most fabled films of all time. Starring Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, the film’s making soon became a cautionary tale, for the lavish extravagance of production on Cleopatra all but bankrupted 20th Century Fox and a…
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The Bolex camera, 16mm reversal film stocks, commercial film laboratories, and low-budget optical printers were the small-gauge media technologies that provided the infrastructure for experimental filmmaking at the height of its cultural impact. Technology and the Making of Experimental Film Culture (Oxford University Press, 2023) by Dr. John Power…
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Earning critical acclaim and commercial success upon its 1998 release, Rushmore-the sophomore film of American auteur Wes Anderson-quickly gained the status of a cult classic. A melancholic coming-of-age story wrapped in comedy drama, Rushmore focuses on the efforts of Max Fischer (Jason Schwartzman)-a brazen and precocious fifteen-year-old-to find…
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It’s the UConn Popcast, and today we are joined by Professor Robert Farley, author of “Andor: Star Wars Recreates the Battle of Algiers (And it Works).” We talk about how Andor, the Disney+ streamer, was deeply influenced by Gillo Pontecorvo’s 1966 movie The Battle of Algiers. Both texts tell the story of a rebellion against authoritarian colonial …
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In 2022, the U.S. Mint released the first batch of its American Women Quarters series, celebrating the achievements of U.S. women throughout its history. The first set of five included Maya Angelou, Sally Ride…and Anna May Wong, the first Asian-American to ever appear on U.S. currency. Katie Gee Salisbury takes on Anna May Wong’s life in her book N…
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Hannah’s successful VBAC after 2 c-sections In a world where VBAC (vaginal birth after c-section) seems like an insurmountable challenge, Hannah took a leap of faith. Listen in as we explore her journey, filled with lots of learning, determination, resilience, and the unwavering belief in her instinct and intuition. Today I am talking with She Birt…
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Is there anything so refreshing for a film fanatic as a film about grownups? The mid-budget We Own the Night (2007) is a tonic in a world of films costing five times the money but offering only one fifth the talent. Join Mike and Dan for an appreciation of a film without seven reversals at its ending or a series of explosions, but one about adults …
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In a world where female sexuality has been hijacked by forces such as porn, patriarchy, and male entitlement – how can we make sexual consent a priority for everyone? Whether it’s on campus, at the workplace or in their homes, Australians are shocked week after week at the violence visited upon women who are simply living their lives.  In 2023, the…
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Albert Brooks: Interviews (UP of Mississippi, 2024) brings together fourteen profiles of and conversations with Brooks (b. 1947), in which he contemplates, expounds upon, and hilariously jokes about the connections between his show business upbringing, an ambivalence about the film industry, the nature of fame and success, and the meaning and purpo…
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In Unhomed: Cycles of Mobility and Placelessness in American Cinema (University of California Press, 2024), Dr. Pamela Roberston Wojcik examines America's ambivalent and shifting attitude toward homelessness. She considers film cycles from five distinct historical moments that show characters who are unhomed and placeless, mobile rather than fixed—…
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“I envy normal women—they’re free,” laments Irina Dubrovna Reed, in Jacques Tourner’s 1942 film, one as noir as Out of the Past which he would direct five years later. Join Mike and Dan for a conversation about a film that explores the same subject as Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and has received, justly or not, “The Criterion Treatment.” They also talk…
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In the summer of 2016, Disney introduced its first Latina princess, Elena of Avalor. Elena, Princess of the Periphery: Disney’s Flexible Latina Girl (Rutgers University Press, 2023) by Dr. Diana Leon-Boys explores this Disney property using multiple case studies to understand its approach to girlhood and Latinidad. Following the circuit of culture …
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In this episode, We speak with Professors Antony Basten and Daniel Christ, as well as Dr David Langley at the Garvan Institute in Sydney, Australia. Where they guide us through the research being done on the alpha-gal molecule and why the Garvan Institute is so interested in understanding it. We talk about everything from how an understanding of al…
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Acclaimed Tamil-language author Perumal Murugan’s books were once burned by far-right groups, and now he’s longlisted for one of the most prestigious awards in literature. Explore Murugan’s profound literary odyssey, from the challenges of being a Tamil writer in rural India, to the turmoil of book burning and societal backlash. This exclusive even…
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Fear of a nuclear apocalypse, despot leaders and a world at war – how did the sharpest minds of the Cold War leave such a legacy of fear? Samuel Moyn’s Liberalism Against Itself: Cold War Intellectuals and the Making of Our Times takes aim at liberalism, portraying it as a failed creed marred by a paranoia of communism. Known for his challenging pe…
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Before Salma Hayek, Eva Longoria, and Penelope Cruz, there was Lupe Velez―one of the first Latin-American stars to sweep past the xenophobia of old Hollywood and pave the way for future icons from around the world. Her career began in the silent era, when her beauty was enough to make it onto the silver screen, but with the rise of talkies, Velez c…
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Contemporary Chinese film and literature often draw on time-honored fantastical texts and tales which were founded in the milieu of patriarchy, parental authority, heteronormativity, nationalism, and anthropocentrism. Cathy Yue Wang's Snake Sisters and Ghost Daughters: Feminist Adaptations of Traditional Tales in Chinese Fantasy (Wayne State Univer…
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Everyone loves gut-busting belly-laughs in a film. But sometimes, big laughs slow things down. There’s something to be said for films that amuse us for their duration. Join us for a conversation about a film that makes us smile from its first moment to its last: The Ladykillers, Alexander Mackendrick’s 1955 dark comedy starring Alec Guinness as the…
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From the theatre mask and masquerade to the masked criminal and the rise of facial recognition software, masks have long performed as an instrument for the protection and concealment of identity. Even as they conceal and protect, masks – as faces – are an extension of the self. At the same time, they are a part of material culture: what are masks m…
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Archival Film Curatorship: Early and Silent Cinema from Analog to Digital (Amsterdam UP, 2023) is the first book-length study that investigates film archives at the intersection of institutional histories, early and silent film historiography, and archival curatorship. It examines three institutions at the forefront of experimentation with film exh…
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Against the frenetic energy and colour of Delhi, a Muslim school teacher is caught between his love of history and contemporary India. Anjum Hasan’s work sheds light on the complexities of life, love, writing history, and how national and patriotic myths can be maliciously subverted. Author Anjum Hasan’s latest book, History’s Angel, is a darkly fu…
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In 1965, Bob Dylan teased the squares by stating, “Something is happening but you don’t know what it is.” The same could be said for childhood and Pan’s Labyrinth (2006) is a film that takes childhood seriously—as opposed to the way it is usually portrayed in big-budget, effects-laden films. Join us for a conversation about a film sometimes compare…
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Within the social sciences and the humanities, international research in Burma/Myanmar studies tends to lean toward political science and Buddhist studies, or what can be characterized as the “soldiers or monks” approach. The political situation within the country has restricted the access that foreign researchers have had to the country. It has al…
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The Blues Brothers: An Epic Friendship, the Rise of Improv, and the Making of an American Film Classic (Grove Atlantic, 2024) tells the story of the epic friendship between John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd, the golden era of improv, and the making of a comedic film classic that helped shape our popular culture. “They’re not going to catch us,” Dan Aykr…
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Human existence has always been bound with the health of our natural world. What can we learn from how a changing climate has already, for centuries, dramatically shaped the development and demise of civilisations across time? In the 2024 Gandhi Oration, renowned historian and author Peter Frankopan unraveled the historical narrative, framing the n…
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It’s the UConn Popcast, and today we discuss Netflix’s new screen adaptation of Chinese science fiction author Liu Cixin’s Three Body trilogy. We discuss the battle between the eye and the idea in film and television science fiction, and whether the new show strikes a successful balance. We consider some of the challenges involved in adapting this …
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How intuition expands talent, creativity, confidence & happinessI have been waiting a long time to record this podcast! To say I am excited about the Intuition Process for children is putting it mildly. I believe this program, with its teachings and the power and integrity of the organisation behind it, has the ability to change the world and, as m…
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This third session of the Accountability in crisis: the rise of impunity as a challenge to human rights explores how to restore public faith in the values and structures underpinning representative government and the role of key stakeholder groups such as business, media and civil society in resisting impunity, reclaiming accountability and reinfor…
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If we could undergo a procedure that would erase the painful memories from our lives, would we do it? That seems to be the question of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) until we realize that we’re asking the wrong question. The real question this film asks is why wouldn’t such a procedure ever work? Join us for a conversation about Miche…
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Can you really die from laughing too hard? Between 1870 and 1920, hundreds of women suffered such a fate—or so a slew of sensationalist obituaries would have us believe. How could laughter be fatal, and what do these reports of women’s risible deaths tell us about the politics of female joy? In Death by Laughter: Female Hysteria and Early Cinema (C…
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In Music and Sound in the Films of Dennis Hopper (Routledge,2024), Stephen Lee Naish explores how as a director Dennis Hopper used music and sound to propel the narrative of his work and to signpost the era in which the films were made and the characters' place within American culture. Naish examines five of Hopper's films to show how this deep eng…
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We are supposed to get smarter as we get older. Do we? If the meaning of your life had to be found in nine representative days, which days would you choose? Are they the same days that your critics would select? Would you live your life differently if you had to watch yourself years later a big screen? Would you think you were as cool as you do now…
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What is the status of art and culture in a world dominated by apps, algorithms, and influencers? Anna Kornbluh’s newest book Immediacy, Or the Style of Too Late Capitalism (Verso, 2023) analyzes a swath of cultural forms from auto-fiction to Netflix binges and immersive art installations. For Kornbluh, neoliberalism’s economic disintermediation man…
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In this episode, I speak with Professor Sheryl van Nunen to unravel the mystery behind a startling association: a history of tick bites and the subsequent onset of often life-threatening allergic reactions to a sugar known as alpha-gal found in mammalian products such as beef, dairy, and pork. Professor van Nunen guides us through the early days of…
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