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Our greatest actors transport us through the magic of fiction, one short story at a time. Sometimes funny. Always moving. Selected Shorts connects you to the world with a rich diversity of voices from literature, film, theater, and comedy. New episodes every Thursday. Produced and distributed by Symphony Space.
 
Hosts Jonathan & Kiley talk about the upcoming week, but a long time ago (and sometimes not so long ago). Occasionally, they even know what they are talking about! Join them in exploring topics like Space Monkeys, Teleportation, Viking Battles, Death Poems, and more!
 
In The Way I Heard It, Mike Rowe gives a different take on a variety of topics—from pop culture to politics, history to Hollywood, each mystery is a trueish tale about someone you know, filled with facts that you don’t. Delivered with Mike’s signature blend of charm, wit, and ingenuity, these stories are part of a larger mosaic—full of surprising revelations, sharp observations, and intimate, behind-the-scenes moments drawn from Mike’s own life and career.
 
Musical Space is a look at all things music, by KMUW music commentator Mark Foley. Mark is Principal Double Bass of the Wichita Symphony Orchestra and Professor of Double Bass and head of Jazz Studies at Wichita State University.He has been a featured soloist with the Wichita Symphony Orchestra, performs extensively as a jazz artist is also an avid bluegrass player. Passionate about promoting new and diverse music, Mark is the founder and music director of the Knob Festival of New Music, a s ...
 
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Bookable

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Bookable

Loud Tree Media

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Bookable features established authors and emerging talent in conversation with host and author Amanda Stern, author of Little Panic and creator of the Happy Ending Music & Reading Series at Joe's Pub and Symphony Space. With an immersive sound experience designed around each episode, Bookable takes you on an audio exploration of a book—usually new, sometimes classic and occasionally obscure but always worth knowing about.
 
The universe is waiting to give us true abundance in all areas of our lives.. Who is right to walk with me into my future? Do they fit in? How do I see myself, how do I see him? The moon always exposes, lies and truth, is he truthful? You suppose to talk to the ones you love often, but you hardly ever speak with him? Time, space and energy is fluid An unfinished symphony; Not about that hermit life, my miracles never run out.. I manifest true Abundance!!! Seek with me for your answers today! ...
 
The Between Meals Podcast features Beth Manos Brickey, FNTP, RWS, RYT, of TastyYummies.com. Food and nutrition, while very important, this is JUST ONE piece of a much larger puzzle. Movement, stress, sleep, emotions, spirit, community, play – these are just as crucial to our wellness and vitality. And should too, be investigated as both potential causes and as cures. What happens between meals is equally as important to our health. We are complex machines. Our system is a delicate symphony o ...
 
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show series
 
Mark Vande Hei and Tom Marshburn will spend this Christmas further away from home than any other beings in the universe. The two astronauts are orbiting the planet on the International Space Station. They join us. And, the Nashville African American Wind Symphony is entirely made up of Black classical musicians. As Paige Pfleger of WLPN reports, it…
 
This week Kiley cut a car into tiny pieces after the Crime of the Century in our old stomping grounds of Boston! Topic: Anthony "Fats" Pino and the multi million dollar Brinks Robbery of 1950. Music: "Another Day" by The Fisherman. Please Rate & Review us on Podchaser! You can find us on Facebook, Twitter, and visit our website at www.HalfwitPodcas…
 
New data measuring COVID-19 levels in Boston's wastewater show a sharp decline. WBUR's Gabrielle Emanuel brings us up to speed. And, Netflix's "Squid Game" has made history for scoring awards and nominations that previously only went to English language shows. We discuss with NPR's TV critic Eric Deggans.…
 
In a The New York Times op-ed, psychologist Adam Grant puts a name to that feeling borne out of the pandemic — showing up for life, but living without purpose and aim. Emory University sociologist Corey Keyes coined that feeling "languishing." We discuss. And, Rock & Roll Hall of Fame musician Elvis Costello talks about his new album "The Boy Named…
 
Researchers report an estimated 200,000 American children were orphaned by COVID-19 — each number representing a child who has parents or primary caregivers to the pandemic. Dr. Charles Nelson, who co-authored the report, and a Georgia couple who is adopting their two cousins after their parents died of COVID-19, join us. And, NPR's Scott Horsley e…
 
Last July, Maggie's Toronto Sex Workers Action Project began organizing vaccine clinics in strip clubs and other locations around the city. They've helped vaccinate more than 3,000 people to date. A clinic organizer joins us. And, actor and director Ruben Santiago-Hudson discusses the legacy of the trailblazing actor Sidney Poitier, who died last w…
 
Guest host Hope Davis presents two stories in which strong bonds between women are evoked, by authors reflecting very different worlds. In Youmna Chlala’s “Nayla,” read by Rita Wolf, two young women in a traditional community form a friendship. In Susan Perabo’s “Life Off My E,” the relationship between sisters is reflected through their shared lov…
 
The new young adult novel "The Chosen One" centers around a Black woman who becomes the first in her family to attend college. Author Echo Brown drew much of the story from her own life. And, as the pandemic goes into its third year, experts say it's time to work toward a new normal. Immunologist Rick Bright shares his strategies for creating a new…
 
Expecting mothers have far bigger problems than tight clothes and morning sickness. Dr. Linda Eckert answers questions from pregnant listeners about staying safe as COVID-19 cases spike. And, Education Secretary Miguel Cardona explains why he and the Biden administration believe schools should stay open amid the omicron surge.…
 
"Slow Burn" host Joel Anderson talks about the latest season of the podcast, which looks at the 1992 riots in Los Angeles. And, on this day 20 years ago, the first detainees were brought from Afghanistan to Guantanamo Bay. New York Times Carol Rosenberg, who has covered Guantanamo Bay since its begining, talks about the state of the naval base toda…
 
American Ballet Theatre star Misty Copeland published the nonfiction kids book "Black Ballerinas" in November. We present an excerpt of a December event centered around the book. And, Washington Post reporter Jada Yuan reflects on the public and private life of her grandmother Dr. Chien-Shiung Wu, a trailblazing nuclear physicist who many say shoul…
 
President Biden is set to make a speech about voting rights in Atlanta Tuesday. James Woodall, former president of the NAACP in Georgia, explains why he signed a letter urging more action from the White House on voting rights. And, CORBEVAX is a low-cost, patent-free vaccine was developed by Dr. Peter Hotez and his colleague Maria Elena Bottazzi. H…
 
A new piece in The Atlantic suggests that wealthier Americans should stop "wasting" COVID-19 tests on social engagements and that instead, tests should be reserved for people who need them most. The author of the article, Dr. Benjamin Mazer, joins us. And, as part of a response to a tornado that killed more than 160 people, Joplin, Missouri, develo…
 
The film "Day of Rage" culls thousands of hours of videos and audio from protestors and police body cams to tell the story of the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection. We speak with Malachy Browne, senior producer of the New York Times Visual Investigations team who produced and co-directed the film. And, a former senior policy adviser for the OSHA, Deborah…
 
A shortage of housing in some parts of the U.S. has led to a rental squeeze. Prospective renters are finding themselves having to offer more than the listing price. KUT's Audrey McGlinchy reports. And, beginning this week, Californians will have to deal with mandatory water restrictions. The director of research, planning and performance for the Ca…
 
Members of Congress mark one year since the deadly insurrection at the U.S. Capitol with a ceremony and moment of silence on the floor of the House of Representatives. We have the latest. And, Rice University historian Douglas Brinkley joins us to reflect on Jan. 6 and how history will view that day.…
 
Guest host Jane Curtin presents two stories from the influential literary journal Ploughshares. “y = mx+b,” by Andrew Altschul uses an algebraic formula to explore the act of storytelling and the shape of life itself. It’s performed by Peter Mark Kendall. In our second story, Jamel Brinkley’s “I Happy Am,” a boy who usually imagines himself as a ro…
 
An investigation continues into the most destructive wildfire in Colorado's history. The Marshall Fire burned nearly a thousand homes in Boulder County. We check in on the recovery effort with Clint Folsom, mayor of Superior, CO. And, within days of Jan. 6, Fox News hosts started to diminish the significance of what happened at the Capitol. NPR's D…
 
Ahead of the first anniversary of the deadly insurrection on the U.S. Capitol, Eddie Glaude of Princeton University weighs in on the state of our democracy. And, Russian President Vladimir Putin maintains his threat to take more Ukrainian territory. We look at diplomatic efforts to defuse the crisis with NPR's Charles Maynes in Moscow.…
 
Michigan Rep. Peter Meijer was one of the only Republicans to vote for the impeachment of former President Donald Trump after Jan. 6. Today, he says the party has no choice but to back Trump in 2024. He joins us to discuss what it means to be a Republican in 2022. And, Jennifer Jenkins, director of Duke's Center for the Study of the Public Domain, …
 
Malcolm Nance, author and former military intelligence analyst, argues that those who believe the 2020 presidential election was stolen are planning for war. He joins us to talk about Jan. 6. And, prairie dogs are sometimes a nuisance for developers and farmers. There's a program that relocates the prairie dogs rather than kill them. But they don't…
 
China has ambitious plans to compete in every winter sport and also to seed a new industry of recreational skiing and skating. The New Yorker's Peter Hessler was there in China to see it — and ski it. And, University of Chicago political scientist Robert Pape has pored over court documents over the past year to learn more about the Jan. 6 rioters. …
 
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra assistant conductor Jonathan Taylor Rush discusses his top classical moments of the year, including the aria "Men Don't Break" from Terence Blanchard's opera "Fire Shut Up in My Bones. And, during their service, Avalisa Ellicott and Paula M. Neira both feared getting kicked out of the military for being transgender. The…
 
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