Nature public
[search 0]
More

Download the App!

show episodes
 
Science, pop culture, and comedy collide on StarTalk Radio! Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist and Director of New York's Hayden Planetarium, and his comic co-hosts, guest celebrities, and scientific experts explore astronomy, physics, and everything else there is to know about life in the universe. New episodes premiere Tuesdays. Keep Looking Up!
 
Join David and Will as they explore the paleontologists’ perspective on various topics in life and earth history. Each episode features a main discussion on a topic requested by the listeners, presented as a lighthearted and educational conversation about fossils, evolution, deep time, and more. Before the main discussion, each episode also includes a news segment, covering recent research related to paleontology and evolution. Each episode ends with the answer to a question submitted by sub ...
 
Mayim Bialik’s Breakdown is a quirky, informative, and interactive podcast breaking down the myths and misunderstandings about mental health and emotional well-being. Neuroscientist Mayim Bialik combines her academic background with vast personal experience to provide listeners with valuable practical advice focusing on removing the stigma surrounding mental health and encouraging an understanding of the mind-body connection. Nothing is off limits as Mayim breaks it down with an amazing coll ...
 
Huberman Lab discusses neuroscience: how our brain and its connections with the organs of our body control our perceptions, our behaviors, and our health. We also discuss existing and emerging tools for measuring and changing how our nervous system works. Dr. Andrew Huberman is a tenured Professor of Neurobiology and Ophthalmology at Stanford School of Medicine. His laboratory studies neural regeneration, neuroplasticity, and brain states such as stress, focus, fear, and optimal performance. ...
 
N
NASACast Audio

1
NASACast Audio

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Weekly+
 
NASACast combines the content of all the NASACast subject area podcasts into a single omnibus podcast. Here you'll find the latest news and features on NASA's missions as well as the popular "This Week @NASA" newsreel.
 
What would happen if you fell into a black hole? How big is the universe? Just what the heck is a quasar, anyway? You've got questions, and astrophysicist Paul Sutter has the answers! Submit questions via Twitter using #AskASpaceman or post to facebook.com/PaulMattSutter. Every week you will come closer to COMPLETE KNOWLEDGE OF TIME AND SPACE!
 
Brain Science makes recent discoveries in neuroscience accessible to listeners of all backgrounds with an emphasis on how these discoveries are unraveling the mystery of how our brains make us human. Host Ginger Campbell, MD (Podcast Hall of Fame 2022) interviews scientists to give you a first hand look at how science is really done. Full show notes and episode transcripts are available at http://brainsciencepodcast.com.
 
B
Big Biology

1
Big Biology

Art Woods and Marty Martin

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly+
 
The biggest biology podcast for the biggest science and biology fans. Featuring in-depth discussions with scientists tackling the biggest questions in evolution, genetics, ecology, climate, neuroscience, diseases, the origins of life, psychology and more!! If it's biological, groundbreaking, philosophical or mysterious you'll find it here.
 
This Week in Microbiology is a podcast about unseen life on Earth hosted by Vincent Racaniello and friends. Following in the path of his successful shows 'This Week in Virology' (TWiV) and 'This Week in Parasitism' (TWiP), Racaniello and guests produce an informal yet informative conversation about microbes which is accessible to everyone, no matter what their science background.
 
Podcast interviews with genius-level (top .1%) practitioners, scientists, researchers, clinicians and professionals in Cancer, 3D Bio Printing, CRISPR-CAS9, Ketogenic Diets, the Microbiome, Extracellular Vesicles, and more. Subscribe today for the latest medical, health and bioscience insights from geniuses in their field(s).
 
Made for audiophiles and nature lovers alike, Future Ecologies is a podcast exploring our eco-social relationships through stories, science, music, and soundscapes. Every episode is an invitation to see the world in a new light – set to original music & immersive soundscapes, and weaving together interviews with expert knowledge holders.
 
The Science of Birds is a lighthearted exploration of bird biology. It's a fun resource for any birder or naturalist who wants to learn more about ornithology. Impress your birding friends at cocktail parties with all of your new bird knowledge! Hosted by Ivan Phillipsen, a passionate naturalist with a PhD in Zoology.
 
Hi there...welcome to Mushroom Hour. Listen in as we venture into kingdom fungi with unique and beautiful humans who all share a passion for mushrooms. We'll go forage for wild mushrooms, explore their potency as nature's medicines, become citizen mycologists, transform human consciousness and learn how mushrooms inspired art, spirituality and culture throughout our history. There are so many ways that mushrooms can benefit (wo)mankind - we just need to tap into the mycelium network and let ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
In Natural Disasters in Latin America and the Caribbean: Coping with Calamity (Routledge, 2021), June Carolyn Erlick explores the relationship between natural disasters and civil society, immigration and diaspora communities and the long-term impact on emotional health. Natural disasters shape history and society and, in turn, their long-range impa…
 
Protest has been a key method of political claim-making in Jordan from the late Ottoman period to the present day. More than moments of rupture within normal-time politics, protests have been central to challenging state power, as well as reproducing it—and the spatial dynamics of protests play a central role in the construction of both state and s…
 
The end of the series is our favourite - we answer your questions! A massive thank you to our patrons who contributed the questions. Go to patreon.com/terriblelizardds for a bonus episode out next week. Do keep in touch #terriblelizards @iszi_lawrence @dave_hone Buy Dave's Book - How fast did T.Rex Run/The future of Dinosaurs. Look out for iszi's c…
 
Casey Dreier of The Planetary Society joins me to talk about Artemis I, where the Artemis program goes from here, and what the 2022 midterm elections mean for space. This episode of Main Engine Cut Off is brought to you by 44 executive producers—Simon, Kris, Pat, Matt, Jorge, Ryan, Donald, Lee, Chris, Warren, Bob, Russell, Moritz, Joel, Jan, David,…
 
Joining us in this episode to discuss homesteading is Dawn Gallop. Dawn is a mother of nine children, a farmer, nurse, artist, cheesemaker, canner, soapmaker, and beekeeper. As someone who wants to share her knowledge with others, Dawn has also taken on the role of an educator. She teaches people her skills both in person and online with her Youtub…
 
Known as highly mobile cattle nomads, the Wodaabe in Niger are today increasingly engaged in a transformation process towards a more diversified livelihood based primarily on agro-pastoralism and urban work migration. Space, Place and Identity: The Wodaabe of Niger in the 21st Century (Berghahn Books, 2020) by Florian Köhler examines recent transfo…
 
This episode is all about the brain, specifically how to optimize cognitive performance and behaviors via neurofeedback. Research shows our brains are highly malleable and neurofeedback is a cutting edge tool to help us safely train broad regulatory actions associated with mood, attention, self-regulation and self-control, sleep, energy, stress, an…
 
Douglas Rushkoff (digital humanism author and documentarian) helps us break down human autonomy in the digital age and the social implications of the tech world. He takes us through his start in the cyberpunk movement, from goals of uniting humanity through the early internet, the intersections of psychedelics and counter culture with computer prog…
 
Would you want to live forever? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and author, inventor, and futurist Ray Kurzweil discuss immortality, longevity escape velocity, the singularity, and the future of technology. What will life be like in 10 years? NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.…
 
This time it's different. As always, it's your space questions, but not my answers. I invited my fellow space YouTubers to give their answers to help me with the Q&A. Enjoy! 🦄 Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/universetoday Thanks to everyone for joining. Here are all the links to their channels: Scott Manley https://www.youtube.com/c/szyz…
 
Water is the backbone of human life, and professionals like Anacleto Rizzo are committed to preserving it. As a hydraulic civil engineer, Anacleto works on sustainable water management, nature-based solutions for wastewater treatment, climate change adaptation policies, sustainable drainage systems, and more… With a Ph.D. in environmental engineeri…
 
My guest this episode is Lex Fridman, Ph.D., a Research Scientist at the Massachusetts Institute for Technology (MIT), an expert on artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics, and the host of the Lex Fridman Podcast. We discuss Lex’s recent trip to the heart of the Ukrainian-Russian War, geopolitics, perspectives on people living in war zones, the s…
 
Thanks to Pranav for suggesting this week’s topic, animals of the Paleogene, the period after the Cretaceous! Thanks also to Llewelly for suggesting the horned screamer, now one of my favorite birds. Further watching: Southern Screamers making noise Horned Screamers making noise Further reading: The Brontotheres Presbyornis looked a lot like a long…
 
The Moon is drifting away from us — at about an inch and a half per year. That’s not much, but it adds up. Billions of years ago, the Moon was much closer than it is now. And because of that, Earth’s days were much shorter. According to a recent study, for example, two and a half billion years ago the Moon was only about 200,000 miles away — roughl…
 
In this episode we talk with the mycologist and notoriously kind human being Alan Rockefeller about mycology, Psilocybe diversity, getting people interested in biodiversity & the biosphere, turning a sedan into a DNA lab, teaching cops about fungal diversity (against their own will as unintentional pupils), and how to teach yourself mycology. This …
 
In this episode we explore what narcissism is (and what is most-definitely is not). There is a form of narcissism which has been, up until now, confused with psychopathy. But a new paper, the result of years of experiments, suggests narcissists are not psychopaths, and psychopaths are not narcissists. In the psychological literature, narcissism com…
 
The hawthorns (Crataegus spp.) are in intriguing group of small trees. They are members of a genus that has sparked plenty of controversy and debate among taxonomists for decades and it doesn't appear to be slowing down any time soon. Regardless of the confusion they cause, there is no denying that hawthorns are as beautiful as they are ecologicall…
 
Large-scale AI models that enable next-generation applications like natural language processing and autonomous systems require intensive training and immense power. The monetary and environmental expense is too great. This is where analog deep learning comes into play. The concept behind it is to develop a new type of hardware that can accelerate t…
 
This podcast is part of a miniseries of interviews with speakers from the 2022 annual conference of the Adelphi Genetics Forum - a learned society that aims to promote research and discussion concerning the scientific understanding of human heredity. Formerly known as the Galton Institute, and before that, the Eugenics Education Society, the societ…
 
The TWiV team reveals a variant SARS-CoV-2 that emerged in deer with deer-to-human transmission, and hybrid virus particles produced by co-infection with influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus particles. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker Subscribe (free): Apple Podcasts, Google Pod…
 
Built-in body armor is common among reptiles and rare among mammals, but armadillos are the major exception. Equipped with a full set of segmented armor over their heads, backs, and tails, armadillos have been waddling around well-protected for tens of millions of years, and their ancient relatives include some of the most famous and preposterous o…
 
What could the chemistry of comets and interstellar objects tell us about the nature of our Solar System? Stefanie N. Milam is a planetary scientist that studies this intriguing subject using specialized ground- and space-based telescopes… Stefanie is the James Webb Space Telescope Deputy Project Scientist for Planetary Science at NASA's Goddard Sp…
 
This podcast is part of a miniseries of interviews with speakers from the 2022 annual conference of the Adelphi Genetics Forum - a learned society that aims to promote research and discussion concerning the scientific understanding of human heredity. Formerly known as the Galton Institute, and before that, the Eugenics Education Society, the societ…
 
In his weekly clinical update Dr. Griffin discusses human monkeypox virus infection in women and non-binary individuals during the 2022 outbreaks, changes in population immunity against infection and severe disease from SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variants in the United States, updates on COVID-19–related mortality, impact of community masking on COVID-19, …
 
Updates on Artemis I. Predicting an asteroid strike with stunning accuracy. Webb’s view of Titan. New adaptive optics for the Very Large Telescope. 🦄 Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/universetoday 00:00 Intro 00:14 Artemis I updates https://www.universetoday.com/158739/artemis-i-has-completed-its-first-flyby-of-the-moon/ 03:29 NASA predic…
 
In this episode, we sit down with Dr. Daniel Britt, the Pegasus Professor of Astronomy and Planetary Sciences at the Department of Physics, University of Central Florida. He joins us today to discuss his research on planetary geology. In addition to his work at the University of Central Florida, Daniel also periodically consults with NASA on their …
 
The idea that meditation is a "mind science" is popular, but in this interview Canadian philosopher Evan Thompson argues that this claim does not stand up to either scientific or philosophical scrutiny. As one of the pioneers of the Embodied Cognition movement Thompson reminds us that the Mind is not restricted to the Brain and we must also conside…
 
This podcast is part of a miniseries of interviews with speakers from the 2022 annual conference of the Adelphi Genetics Forum - a learned society that aims to promote research and discussion concerning the scientific understanding of human heredity. Formerly known as the Galton Institute, and before that, the Eugenics Education Society, the societ…
 
On Mars, visitors from Earth are like loud neighbors who refuse to settle down. On Mars, though, the noise doesn’t travel far — it fades out in a hurry. We’re learning a lot more about how sound travels on Mars from one of those noisy visitors, the Perseverance rover. It’s been crawling across Mars for 21 months. It’s looking for evidence that its …
 
For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Caenagnathus, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Caenagnathus-Episode-417/ Join us at www.patreon.com/iknowdino for dinosaur requests, bonus content, ad-free episodes, and more. Dinosaur of the day Caenagnathus, A large oviraptorosaur that lived in the Late Cretaceous i…
 
On this week’s show: Meta’s algorithm tackles both language and strategy in a board game, and measuring how much water people use on a daily basis First up this week on the podcast, artificial intelligence (AI) wins at the game Diplomacy. Freelance science journalist Matthew Hutson joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about the advances needed for an AI…
 
How does the brain react to sound therapy? In this episode, we connect with Lee Gerdes, the CEO of Cereset, a wellness company that helps its clients “relax their brains to manage stress, restore hope and achieve restful sleep.” With a background in math, physics, psychology, theology, and computer software, Lee has made fascinating discoveries reg…
 
TWiM presents evidence that over half of human pathogenic diseases are impacted by climate change, and considers how a novel prokaryote discovered next to an underground stream illuminates the pathway to multicellularity. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, Petra Levin and Mark Martin. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode Climate…
 
This podcast is part of a miniseries of interviews with speakers from the 2022 annual conference of the Adelphi Genetics Forum - a learned society that aims to promote research and discussion concerning the scientific understanding of human heredity. Formerly known as the Galton Institute, and before that, the Eugenics Education Society, the societ…
 
“History has not been kind to Himalaya,” writes historian and travel writer John Keay in his latest book Himalaya: Exploring the Roof of the World (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2022). The region, nestled between India, China and Central Asia, has long been subject to political and imperial intrigue–and at times violent invasion. But the region also provi…
 
This week we bring you the Tom Hanks of the trees, the white oak (Quercus alba). We take a deep dive in how this ubiquitous tree has been a cultural icon since before the "first Thanksgiving" and see how it has maintained a reverence unlike almost all others. 10% off all stickers on the merch store (arbortrarypod.com/merch) with coupon code HOLIDAY…
 
The James Webb Space Telescope has analyzed the atmosphere of an exoplanet and found astonishing new evidence of water vapor, carbon dioxide, and sulfur dioxide. In this episode, you will learn: 1. The James Webb Space Telescope has discovered new atmospheric compositions on the exoplanet Wasp-39b, including sulfur dioxide, potassium, and carbon mo…
 
Is there a chance for life to continue after the Sun eventually explodes? Can we find evidence of potentially habitable planets near white dwarfs, remnants of dead stars? How can future telescopes helo with that? 🦄 Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/universetoday 🐦 Dr Andrew Vanderburg on Twitter: https://mobile.twitter.com/amvanderburg 🕸️ …
 
Having a baby as a working mom is incredibly demanding. Unfortunately, many mothers can feel as though they don’t have the proper resources to take care of their babies while working – especially when breastfeeding and pumping are involved… Today we chat with Allison Tolman, a nurse, lactation consultant, and breast pump expert that is committed to…
 
Artemis 1, the most powerful rocket to ever leave the Earth, is up and on its way to the Moon after more hydrogen leaks than we care to remember, and Up Astroquark Dr. Hannah Sargeant signs off on her last Walkabout appearance as she is away to new adventures. We review the Artemis 1 mission, a new tracer for the origin of water on Earth and Mars, …
 
This podcast is part of a miniseries of interviews with speakers from the 2022 annual conference of the Adelphi Genetics Forum - a learned society that aims to promote research and discussion concerning the scientific understanding of human heredity. Formerly known as the Galton Institute, and before that, the Eugenics Education Society, the societ…
 
A Great and Rising Nation: Naval Exploration and Global Empire in the Early US Republic (University of Chicago Press, 2022) by Dr. Michael A. Verney illuminates the unexplored early decades of the United States’ imperialist naval aspirations. Conventional wisdom holds that, until the Spanish-American War of 1898, the United States was a feeble play…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2022 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login