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Science, pop culture and comedy collide on StarTalk Radio! Astrophysicist and Hayden Planetarium director Neil deGrasse Tyson, his comic co-hosts, guest celebrities and scientists discuss astronomy, physics, and everything else about life in the universe. Keep Looking Up! New episodes premiere Friday nights at 7pm ET.
 
What makes us human? How are we different from chimpanzees? Who are our earliest ancestors and how do we know? Origin Stories is The Leakey Foundation’s podcast about how we became human. This award-winning show combines science and narrative to explore our human story and explain why we are the way we are. Listen and explore human evolution one story at a time.
 
This Week in Microbiology is a podcast about unseen life on Earth hosted by Vincent Racaniello and friends. Following in the path of his successful shows 'This Week in Virology' (TWiV) and 'This Week in Parasitism' (TWiP), Racaniello and guests produce an informal yet informative conversation about microbes which is accessible to everyone, no matter what their science background.
 
Take a fact-based journey through the cosmos. Tune in to hear weekly discussions on astronomical topics ranging from planets to cosmology. Hosted by Fraser Cain (Universe Today) and Dr. Pamela L. Gay (SIUE), this show brings the questions of an avid astronomy lover direct to an astronomer. Together Fraser and Pamela explore what is known and being discovered about the universe around us. Astronomy Cast is supported through individual donations and the sponsorship of Swinburne Astronomy Online.
 
Planetary Radio brings you the human adventure across our solar system and beyond. We visit each week with the scientists, engineers, leaders, advocates and astronauts who are taking us across the final frontier. Regular features raise your space IQ while they put a smile on your face. Join host Mat Kaplan and Planetary Society colleagues including Bill Nye the Science Guy, Bruce Betts, and Emily Lakdawalla as they dive deep into the latest space news. The monthly Space Policy Edition takes ...
 
John Leeman and Shannon Dulin discuss geoscience and technology weekly for your enjoyment! Features include guests, fun paper Friday selections, product reviews, and banter about recent developments. Shannon is a field geologist who tolerates technology and John is a self-proclaimed nerd that tolerates geologists.
 
What would happen if you fell into a black hole? How big is the universe? Just what the heck is a quasar, anyway? You've got questions, and astrophysicist Paul Sutter has the answers! Submit questions via Twitter using #AskASpaceman or post to facebook.com/PaulMattSutter. Every week you will come closer to COMPLETE KNOWLEDGE OF TIME AND SPACE!
 
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show series
 
The 2020 Mars Rover will reach the Red Planet on February 18th after many months in the relative quiet of space. It will then undergo a true trial by fire as it descends to the surface. Jet Propulsion Lab systems engineer and his colleagues hope it will arrive as successfully as its sister Curiosity did in 2012. He tells host Mat Kaplan what to exp…
 
“I felt I had to stand up and be heard at least by the local council; it was never my intention that the video clip would go viral internationally….I gave my opinion, which seems to have struck a chord for many people internationally,” says Dr. Roger Hodkinson. He’s not an anti-vaxxer, he’s not a so-called conspiracy theorist: he’s a well-recognize…
 
Michael Simpson is a Professor Emeritus of Botany who is the Author of one of the best textbooks available on the evolutionary history, grouping and Identification of plant species - Plant Systematics. Taxonomy, Evolution, & Diversity of Plants on Earth? What are phylogenetics? What is a "biogeography dungeon" and why is it fascinating as shit to b…
 
“One of my mottos is ‘no brain left behind’, and I love the most complex cases,” says Kristen Willeumier. Surprisingly, some of those complex cases can be solved through natural, simple means. Tune in to learn: Whether depression and other psychiatric conditions actually produces changes in the brain that can be detected via electrical and function…
 
After spending about a month on the International Space Station, SpaceX’s new Cargon Dragon capsule splashed down off the coast of Florida. It’s a departure from previous versions of the vehicle which splashed down in the Pacific. The new splash zone means scientists can get their hands on their returning equipment faster, meaning they can make cri…
 
We are jumping into the podcast feed with a few quick updates. We’re revamping our Patreon tier system to give you more Big Biology content. We also created a Facebook group where you can discuss Big Biology episodes with other fans and we're starting to upload transcripts for select episodes on BigBiology.org. Become a Patron: https://www.patreon.…
 
Since passing through our solar system in 2017, ‘Oumuamua has been a hot topic of conversation for astronomers. Neil deGrasse Tyson and co-host Chuck Nice answer fan-submitted Cosmic Queries about ‘Oumuamua with cosmochemist Dr. Natalie Starkey. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.sta…
 
Astronomy Cast Ep. 591: What Are We Gonna Do With All That Space Junk? by Fraser Cain & Dr. Pamela Gay Remember the good old days when there were only a few thousand living and dead satellites? Well, those days are long over. We're now entering an era where there will be tens of thousands of satellites. Not to mention the spent rocket boosters and …
 
Digital stethoscopes, otoscopes, home hemodialysis programs, video conferencing, electronic consults…you name it: digital healthcare technologies are being delivered to patients who would otherwise face significant challenges accessing the care they need for managing chronic conditions. Press play to discover: How biometric data can be transmitted …
 
Meagan Crawford, Co-Founder and Managing Partner of SpaceFund and host of the Mission Eve podcast, joins the show to talk about the financing side of space. We talk about recent rounds of fundraising, acquisitions, holding companies, and she helps me sort through my thoughts on the whole Special Purpose Acquisition Company trend. This episode of Ma…
 
This week we’re on the cutting edge of science, learning about the brand new genetic study of dire wolves that rearranges everything we know about the dire wolf and other canids! Also, a bonus turtle update. Further reading: Dire Wolves Were Not Really Wolves, Genetic Clues Reveal An artist’s rendition of dire wolves and grey wolves fighting over a…
 
This episode: An interesting bacterial genetic element protects against viruses in a unique way! Download Episode (7.1 MB, 10.3 minutes) Show notes: Microbe of the episode: Mongoose associated gemykibivirus 1 News item Takeaways Even single-celled, microscopic organisms such as bacteria have to deal with deadly viruses infecting them. And while the…
 
In the 70s it was still possible to find doctors practicing medicine. Health care was then privatized and the slow creep of the medical insurance takeover was under way. Currently, it seems, the quality and level of medical care available is determined by insurance companies who make dictates based on spreadsheets and bottom lines – not curing bodi…
 
This week Matt is joined by another new regular show co-host Harriet Brettle to chat about all things space at the start of the Year.Space Song playlist on Spotify bit.ly/spacesongsIf you enjoy the show please go over to www.Patreon.com/Interplanetary and become a Patron or even a producer of the show.If you enjoy why not join the BIS at www.bis-sp…
 
Imagine being able to travel back 120 million years to the Early Cretaceous and scoop up handfuls of the forest floor. The amount you would discover in that material would be mind blowing and, amazingly, this is essentially what my guest gets to do. Dr. Fabiany Herrera is a paleobotanist based at the Chicago Botanic Garden who is currently helping …
 
How many stars in the sky? Gaia astronomer Timo Prusti is more qualified than most to posit an answer. He helps manage the project undertaken by the ESA mission space lab called Gaia—to measure the position of almost 2 million stars—and talks about the far-reaching implications and space exploration benefits. Listen and learn How the mechanics of t…
 
The TWiVy team deconstructs CoronaVac, the inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine produced by Sinovac Biotech, and production of multivalent camelid nanobodies that block infection with the virus and suppress selection of neturalization-resistant variants. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Brianne Barker Subscribe (…
 
Dr. Daniel Geschwind Bio: Dr. Geschwind is the Gordon and Virginia MacDonald Distinguished Professor of Human Genetics, Neurology and Psychiatry at UCLA. In his capacity as Senior Associate Dean and Associate Vice Chancellor of Precision Health, he leads the Institute for Precision Health (IPH) at UCLA, where he oversees campus precision health ini…
 
In COVID-19 clinical update #45, Daniel Griffin discusses J&J Ad26 vaccine results, reactogenicity after the second dose of mRNA vaccines, expansion of vaccine eligibility, and the finding that encephalitis after SARS-CoV-2 infection is a cytokine release syndrome. Hosts: Daniel Griffin and Vincent Racaniello Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcas…
 
The Sun can feel cold and remote at this time of year. But that’s not the case for a NASA spacecraft. It’s scheduled to fly less than nine million miles from the Sun tomorrow. That’s far closer than any other spacecraft has ever been. Parker Solar Probe is designed to study the Sun’s magnetic field, plus the solar wind — a flow of charged particles…
 
You’re at the top of your game and you get injured. Now what? Neil deGrasse Tyson and co-hosts Gary O’Reilly and Chuck Nice explore injury recovery and rehabilitation with Lindsey Vonn and exercise scientist Shona Halson. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Photo Credit: Après Productions. See omnystu…
 
This is not your normal episode of the Space Policy Edition, but these are not normal times. The centuries-old U.S. tradition of the peaceful transfer of power ended on 6 January 2021, as a pro-Trump mob stormed the U.S. Capitol building during the certification of the electoral college vote, leaving 5 dead. Hours later, more than one hundred membe…
 
Do you think that intense, beneficial states of flow are only for extreme athletes? Not true, says Steven Kotler. In fact, we all have the tools for this process that leads to human performance optimization. He discusses his new book about human performance impact factors, offering key steps in this conversation. Listen and learn How an experience …
 
In the first episode of 2021, Matt talks to Sreyashi Basu who with her collaborator Sanjib Bhakta, was awarded the Outreach prize for their Joi Hok! initiative. The project uses traditional art forms and music to communicate knowledge of tuberculosis to school children in India.To find out more about Joi Hok: Joi Hok YouTube - https://www.youtube.c…
 
Two “number threes” are swinging past each other in the evening sky. One of them is Mars, which looks like a bright orange star high in the south at nightfall. And the other is Uranus. It’s just a few degrees from Mars, but you need binoculars to pick it out. The planets of the solar system are split into two groups of four — one group close to the…
 
Meet the small DNA differences that make their mark by existing in the magical period of early development. We'll hear how mutations in the very first stages of human embryos have bizarre consequences for identical twins; and how even earlier in the process, sperm use selfish genes to get ahead of the competition. Plus, an immunologist untangles mR…
 
On this episode of Big Biology we talk to Christine Cooper (@CECooperEcophys), a vertebrate ecophysiologist and professor at Curtin University, Australia. Christine’s research focuses on the thermal, metabolic, and water physiology of Australian mammals and birds. Her recent research, published in the Journal of Experimental Biology (a sponsor of t…
 
Diagnosed just a few weeks past her eight birthday, it wasn't until she was an adult that she realized how isolated she had always felt as a result of being a diabetic. She and another type 1 had befriended each other, and after talking about diabetes type 1 diet and exercise types, they realized that combing forces and sharing information might he…
 
"This is the worse superbug you can get," said her husband's doctors when diagnosing him with a life-threatening multidrug resistant bacterial infection. But Steffanie Strathdee put her research skills to work and eventually was able to convince doctors to treat him with an experimental phage therapy that ended up saving his life. Listen and learn …
 
Futurist media theorist, author, podcast host, and Professor of Media Theory and Digital Economics at CUNY/Queens, Douglas Rushkoff joins Jamie Wheal to share the emergence of crypto fascism among QAnon, left-wing conspiracies, the new thought plandemic, digital memes as occult sigils, and the end of the world. For the full show notes visit: https:…
 
We take a look at the history of mRNA, and the story behind the development of mRNA vaccines and how they’ve been pressed into service at breakneck speed to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic. Full show notes, transcript, music credits and references online at GeneticsUnzipped.com Follow us on Twitter @GeneticsUnzip Genetics Unzipped is written and prese…
 
For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Aardonyx, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Aardonyx-Episode-320/ To get access to lots of patron only content check out https://www.patreon.com/iknowdino Dinosaur of the day Aardonyx, an Early Jurassic sauropodomorph from South Africa with the beginning signs of a qua…
 
A couple of planets lead the Moon down the sky after sunset. Both planets are bright. But they’re quite low in the sky, so they’ll be hard to see. You need a clear horizon — no trees or buildings to block the view. And binoculars can help you pick them out. Start looking soon after sunset. First find the Moon, which is the barest of crescents. The …
 
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