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AM

ABC News

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AM is Australia's most informative morning current affairs program. With key political interviews and stories about the Australian way of life, AM sets the agenda for the nation’s daily news and current affairs coverage.
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Sabra Lane shines a light on stories of hope and problem-solving people around Australia. Each week you’ll hear good news stories about people who are trying to make a difference in the world. You can be part of it too! Get in touch any time at TheBrightSide@your.abc.net.au
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Julia Baird and Jeremy Fernandez chat about the stories you're obsessed with, the stuff you've missed and the things that matter. Episodes drop every Wednesday afternoon. We want to hear from you! Join the conversation and email the show at notstupid@abc.net.au
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The World Today is a comprehensive current affairs program which backgrounds, analyses, interprets and encourages debate on events and issues of interest and importance to all Australians.
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Once the proceedings begin, this podcast will bring you all the key updates from the case involving accused triple murderer, Erin Patterson, and an allegedly poisonous mushroom lunch. If and when the case proceeds to a full trial, we'll cover it daily. It's the case that's captured the attention of the world. Erin Patterson, charged with three counts of murder and five counts of attempted murder, is now waiting for her day in court. She says she's innocent. The charges stem from a Beef Welli ...
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ABC News Daily is the podcast that helps you understand the issues affecting your world. Every episode, host Samantha Hawley walks through one story with the help of an ABC colleague or expert in under 15 minutes. When you want coverage you can trust, listen to ABC News Daily.
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Religion: it’s at the centre of world affairs, but profound questions still remain. Why are you here? What happens when you die? Does God matter? God Forbid seeks the answers.
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Wantok

Radio Australia

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The Wantok Program is 30 minutes of news and current affairs broadcast on Radio Australia twice a day Monday to Friday in Papua New Guinea Tok Pisin, Solomon Islands Pijin and Vanuatu Bislama pidgin languages.
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Australian nature is full of strange, surprising and sometimes silly sounds. From cicadas that sound like sprinklers to moaning mutton birds, there are heaps of weird noises to discover. Join host and nature lover, Ann, as we use our ears to listen to the different sounds that Australian nature makes. Along the way we’ll find out some fun facts and train little ears to listen to the chorus of calls that make up the natural world around us.
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Dave Ruby Howe and Max Quinn are your guides through the week's best new independent Australian songs. Meet the next big Australian breakout and stay ahead of the curve. You'll also hear only the very best special content from triple j Unearthed.
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RN Breakfast daily stories separated out for easy listening. RN Breakfast is the program informed Australians wake up to. Start each day with comprehensive coverage and analysis of national and international events, and hear interviews with the people who matter today—along with those who'll be making news tomorrow.
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Dino Dome

ABC Kids listen

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Monstrous meat-eaters, humble herbivores and stealthy scavengers meet in the Dino Dome for the greatest race of all time. But there’s a catch: the landscape is never the same! From deserts and volcanoes to the deep sea and suburban streets… anything goes in the Dino Dome! Cheer on your favourite prehistoric predators while learning about their strengths, weaknesses and quirks in an action-packed Mesozoic mash-up of science fact and fiction.
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Overnights is heard from 2am to 6am nationally on the ABC. There is great music and interesting guests from Australia and all parts of the globe. You'll hear conversations about food, travel, science, music, books, personal finance, sport, film, astronomy, fashion, gardening, relationships, collectables and much more.
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As early as 1917, the Soviets began their race to become the world’s leading science authority - with very mixed results. The successes included launching the world’s first man into space and the failures included the starvation of millions of their own people. Guest: Simon Ings, author of Stalin and the Scientists; A History of Triumph and Tragedy…
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Christina Lamb OBE, Chief Foreign Correspondent at the Sunday Times, has reported from the world’s hotspots now for decades, including Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Iraq. She wrote a searing analysis of the problems with many of the western involvements in these countries, and about her experience being ambushed by the Taliban in Iraq. But in the year…
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From the earliest days, control of the media was a hard fought battle. In the 1930s, a massive campaign was waged by Australian newspaper barons against the formation of an independent news service at the ABC. Then, from the 1940s through to the 1970s, twelve independent newspaper companies morphed into a handful of multimedia giants, controlling p…
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Sir Thomas Cromwell, the medieval mastermind and “the politician’s politician’, was brought vividly to life under the powerful pen of Dame Hilary Mantel. The first woman to ever win the Booker Prize twice, for Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies, the late Hilary Mantel spoke to Phillip in 2015 about her approach to this most inscrutable figure. And s…
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Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal transformed America between 1933 and 1938. FDR’s defenders always credit him with having saved capitalism, while detractors argue the New Deal was an authoritarian program. A fascinating reassessment of his legacy. Guests: Ira Katznelson, Ruggles Professor of Political Science and History at Columbia University. Aut…
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World famous for his incisive reporting, unique polemic, and winning public debates, the late Christopher Hitchens is a sorely missed addition to the media in general, and Late Night Live in particular. The author of over 30 books, Hitchens spoke to Phillip about his autobiography HITCH 22 – A Memoir, in 2010 while he was in Sydney. Guest: Christop…
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Decades after the work of the Cambridge Ring of Spies was made public, more evidence was unearthed from the files of M15 and unseen family papers, revealing the true extent of Kim Philby’s betrayals and treachery in the work he did for the Soviet Union. Guest: Ben MacIntyre is a columnist and Associate Editor of the Times of London and the author o…
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John Bell has spent most of his professional career in the company of William Shakespeare. In this interview, he takes us on a journey from his childhood; what drew him to the stage and a love of performing, as well as the life of William Shakespeare himself. Guest: John Bell, author of On Shakespeare (Allen and Unwin).…
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After losing a number of heartland seats, the 2022 federal election was widely seen as plunging the Liberal Party into an existential crisis. So how and why has the LNP strayed so far from Menzies original vision of 1944? Guests: Fred Chaney, former Deputy Leader of the Liberal Party (1989 – 1990) Judith Brett, Emeritus Professor of politics at La …
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One of Australia’s most successful and revered filmmakers, Gillian Armstrong is a multiple award winning director, and her most successful films include “My Brilliant Career”, “Little Women”, “Oscar and Lucinda”, and “Charlotte Grey” among many more. Gillian talks to Phillip about her extraordinary life. Guest: Gillian Armstrong…
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Widely regarded as one of the world’s greatest stage, film and TV actors, Sir Ian McKellen, was in Australia to perform the stage production of Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot. McKellen was knighted in 1991 for services to theatre in the UK, and is also a founder of Stonewall UK which lobbies for legal and social equality for gay people. They di…
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Designer dogs are all the rage today, but the modern way of ordering and breeding dogs is an English invention which started in 1860. Dogs began to be categorized according to their form and not function, and breeds became increasingly uniform and standardized. So was this good or bad? Guest Michael Worboys, author of Invention of the Modern Dog; B…
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Richard Flanagan spoke to Phillip about tracing the path from H.G. Wells’ 1914 novel, The World Set Free, to the invention of the atomic bomb and the bombing of Hiroshima, which saw his father’s internment in a Japanese prison camp come to an end. In his semi-autobiographical book, Question 7, Flanagan returns again and again to a question – “Who l…
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For every speech that is delivered, there exists an undelivered opposite. Jeff Nussbaum discusses the speeches the world never got to hear, and why. For example, the victory speech that Hilary Clinton wrote, but never got to make, or the poignant and relevant speech which President John F. Kennedy never got to deliver on that fatal day in Dallas, T…
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Former ballerina, Jennifer Homans, charts the history of ballet from its beginnings, its export from France to Russia, and its transformation in New York under the work of George Balanchine. In a second discussion, a scientific study tries to untangle just how creativity, memory, and practise, work together in the mind of ballet dancers. Guests: Je…
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Historian Bettany Hughes says it is high time we reappraised Venus-Aphrodite. "She was never just a goddess of romantic love - for millennia she represented something much stronger and darker." Likewise Helen of Troy - was she a goddess, princess or whore, mythical or real? Guest: Bettany Hughes author of The History of Venus, and Helen of Troy; Go…
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Sarah Dry delves into the 150 year effort to understand the world’s climate systems in her book Waters of the World. The book is a collection of six mini biographies of the scientists who uncovered the global climate systems by studying water – from ice sheets and glaciers, to surging ocean currents to rainclouds. They came to see these as all part…
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How Indigenous songlines have managed to survive intact for tens of thousands of years and why they are so important – for all Australians. Guests: Margo Neale, Head of the Centre for Indigenous Knowledges, senior Indigenous curator, and principal adviser to the director of the National Museum of Australia. Lynne Kelly, Science writer working as an…
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In 1970, at the age of twenty-one, the Kate Jennings made an impassioned, trailblazing speech at a Vietnam Moratorium rally, simultaneously putting feminism on the Australian agenda. Soon after, she moved to New York and produced an insider’s account of Wall Street’s heyday, and later collapse, in her book Moral Hazard. Kate Jennings died in 2021 G…
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The genius behind so many successful comedy films and TV programs in Australia, such as D-Gen, The Late Night Show, The Castle, Hollow Men and Utopia. Rob Sitch discusses the working of comedy teams, making live comedy to air and the challenges of acting, writing and directing. Guest: Rob SitchBy Australian Broadcasting Corporation
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In 1977, a group of scientists led by Dr Carl Sagan from Cornell University, created a record of humanity to send into space in an attempt to make us comprehendible to aliens. The contents included 115 images and a variety of natural sounds, such as those made by surf, wind and thunder, birds, whales, other animals, among other things. Dr Sagan sai…
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Down from a peak of 60,000 nuclear weapons held by Russia and the United States at the end of the Cold War, today they number 13,000. But nuclear nations are building up their arsenals again, speeding towards the next arms race. The only agreement still in place is the New START Treaty which is set to expire in February 2026. Guest: William J. Perr…
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One of the most powerful books ever discussed on Late Night Live, Professor Howard French argues that the role of Africa has been intentionally sidelined from the story of the making of the modern world. He believes that the true extent of the exploitation of Africa by the West – that is ‘the West’ prior to the United States of America – is worse t…
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The extraordinary Rory Stewart tells the story of walking across Iran, Pakistan, the Himalayas and Afghanistan following 9/11. He made it his business to understand local cultural practices and languages during his time as author, historian and former diplomat in Iraq and Libya. Then in 2023 Phillip speaks to him again after Rory had had enough of …
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The story of one woman’s journey to unearth the incredible history of pianos in Siberia. Pianos began spreading across this region 250 years ago, under the rule of Catherine the Great. Grand instruments created during the 19th century boom years, and humble, Soviet-made uprights, reveal not only these people’s love of music, but also Siberia’s terr…
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Emerging First Nations astrophysicists, Krystal de Napoli and Karlie Noon, explore the connections between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander environmental and cultural practices and the behaviour of the stars, and what must be done to preserve this knowledge into the future. Guests: Krystal de Napoli and Karlie Noon,First Nations astrophysicist…
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Wade Davis came to global attention in a Rolling Stone article which argued that the COVID-19 pandemic revealed to the world the true state of the US. Comparing the rise of the US during WW2 from a country which had an incredibly small army, to become a global superpower, Davis laments the extent of America’s social and political demise. Guest: Wad…
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In the 1960's Jane Goodall became a household name for her groundbreaking work with chimpanzees in Tanzania. Now, at 90 years old, she has travelled to Australia to inspire people to take action to slow down climate change. Guest: Dr Jane Goodall - primatologist and anthropologist; UN Messenger of Peace and Founder of the Jane Goodall Institute. Sh…
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Jane Goodall is most well know for her work with chimpanzees in Tanzania, but she is currently in Australia explaining why she has hope for the climate. Michela Wrong has been researching the President of Rwanda Paul Kagame and questions why the west continues to support him.By Australian Broadcasting Corporation
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It's now 30 years since the Rwandan genocide that saw almost one million citizens die in just 100 days in likely the fastest genocide in history. Soon Rwandans return to the polls where it's almost guaranteed that President Paul Kagame, the leader now for 20 years, will be re-elected. Despite a dire human rights record and the assassination of perc…
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In 2014 the Western Sydney Wanderers won the biggest club football competition in Asia with an underdog story out of Hollywood. In the process, they electrified fans and changed the way sport could be consumed in Australia. There was a dark side too, with some supporters clashing with police, the league and their own club officials. This is a uniqu…
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If you’ve experienced traumatic childbirth - you know it can have some lasting effects as you come to terms with what you experienced, often with a young baby to care for at the same time. A NSW inquiry into birth trauma has made sweeping recommendations as to how the birth experience for women can be improved. The Select Committee on Birth Trauma'…
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