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Best Dr Alice Evans podcasts we could find (updated June 2020)
Best Dr Alice Evans podcasts we could find
Updated June 2020
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The Sunday Salon is a podcast celebrating brilliant books and the women who write them, hosted by journalist Alice-Azania Jarvis. Each week she chats to an inspiring female author about her work, her career, how she writes, what she reads and everything in between. This is not some academic textual analysis – it’s about finding the stories behind the stories, and celebrating the joy that books bring, no matter what genre, or style. Tune in each Sunday to hear from guests including How Do You ...
 
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I confess, I’m slightly obsessed with this week’s guest - not least because she is probably the first person I’ve interviewed who can claim to have written 20 bestsellers in 20 years. Yes, it is Adele Parks, author of, among others, Lies Lies Lies, Playing Away - and now Just My Luck, a gripping and hugely compelling look at the tensions that follo…
 
Crops, technology, & exit options influenced whether societies became democratic or authoritarian - argues Professor David Stasavage.Rulers wanted to tax their people at the right level: extract the maximum revenue without making the goose hiss! Their strategy would depend on crop yields and technology. If caloric output is easy to predict (owing t…
 
Dr Alyson J McGregor is an Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and the Co-Founder and Director of the university’s Division of Sex and Gender in Emergency Medicine (SGEM). She is also the author of Sex Matters: How Male-Centric Medicine Endangers Women’s Health - and What We Can Do About…
 
My guest this week is the brilliant Marisa Meltzer. A columnist for the New York Times' Style section, she has just released This Is Big: How the Founder of Weight Watchers Changed the World - and Me. Part biography of Jean Nidetch, the housewife from Queens who set up the world’s most famous diet company, part memoir documenting Marisa’s attitude …
 
My guest this week is the phenomenal Gavanndra Hodge, whose memoir The Consequences of Love is undoubtedly one of this year’s most hotly-anticipated books. Growing up, Gavanndra had the most extraordinary home life - her father was a drug dealer and hairdresser to the fast-living Chelsea set and, when she was 14, her sister Candy died in front of h…
 
My guest this week is the phenomenal Stacey Halls whose sweeping historical novel The Familiars was the bestselling debut of 2019. She has followed it up with The Foundling, set in 18th Century London and telling the story of a young mother named Bess who attempts to reclaim her daughter from London’s Foundling Hospital only to find that someone pr…
 
My guest for this week's Sunday Salon isolationcast is a really special one. I'm thrilled to have spoken to Naoise Dolan, author of the newly-released bestseller Exciting Times. One of the year's most hotly-tipped debuts, it tells the story of Ava, a young Irish woman teaching English in Hong Kong, and her romantic relationships with Julian, a rich…
 
Today I discuss 3 fantastic new books on work, families, and social change - C19-21.'Making Motherhood Work: How Women Manage Careers and Caregiving', by Caitlyn Collins https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691178851/making-motherhood-work'Double Lives: A History of Working Motherhood', by Helen McCarthywww.bloomsbury.com/uk/double-lives…
 
The not-so-good news is that we're still in lockdown - but the good news is that we're still doing our isolationcasts. Today's guest is Gemma Milne, a science and technology writer, Expert Advisor to the European Commission and Innovate UK, and the author of Smoke & Mirrors: How Hype Obscures the Future and How to See Past It. I found chatting to G…
 
Why has China grown so fast for so long despite vast corruption? In China's Gilded Age, Professor Ang argues that not all types of corruption hurt growth, nor do they cause the same kind of harm. Ang reveals that the rise of capitalism was not accompanied by the eradication of corruption, but rather by its evolution from thuggery and theft to acces…
 
So how's WFH going for you? As lockdown continues, it's easy to feel that everyone is being hyper-productive - doing their job while knocking out a loaf of sourdough and clocking up a five mile run each day. In this episode, I discuss the weird pressure to keep on 'doing' with Lauren Bravo (author of What Would the Spice Girls Do?, and How to Break…
 
Nineteenth century Britain saw remarkable economic growth and a rise in real wages. But not everyone shared in the nation’s wealth. Unable to earn a sufficient income themselves, working-class women were reliant on the ‘breadwinner wage’ of their husbands. When income failed, or was denied or squandered by errant men, families could be plunged into…
 
It's the second Sunday Salon isolation special. This week, as we all adjust to life under lockdown, I’m talking to Gina Martin, author of Be The Change: A Toolkit for the Activist in You. You probably know Gina because of her amazing campaign against upskirting. In June 2017, a man took a photo up her skirt at a music festival. The police told her …
 
What a strange and unsettling time we find ourselves in. So strange that I didn't think I could post a regular episode - so instead, here is the first Sunday Salon isolation special, one of several dedicated #togetherapart episodes I will be bringing you to - I hope - offer a balm for the soul over the coming weeks. I'm so grateful to the authors H…
 
Deepa Anappara's novel Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line was one of the most hotly anticipated debuts of the year. Set in a slum on the outskirts of an unnamed Indian city, it centres on nine year old, cop-show obsessed Jai and his two best friends, who go looking for local children who’ve gone missing. It has won rave reviews from critics and high p…
 
Poor slum-dwellers are FOUR times less likely to believe that they will get a response when directly approaching an official than poor rural villager.So controlling for income, the slum dwellers are much more despondent about government - find Dr Gabi Kruks-Wisner (UVA) and Dr Adam Auerbach (American University).This reflects differing observations…
 
It’s the final episode of the year!!!!! Thank you so much to everyone who has listened to the Sunday Salon - after 48 episodes (!) I’m having a break for a few weeks, but I’ll be back next year with a new series. In the meantime, I hope you enjoy this fittingly festive finale with Lucy Foley - whose best-selling book The Hunting Party is about what…
 
I’ve known Catriona Innes for a little while now - she is the features director at Cosmopolitan and we shared an office when I was the acting deputy editor at ELLE. But I knew of her before that - because of her award-winning journalism, which has taken in everything from investigations into harassment on the Tube to what it was like growing up wit…
 
My guest this week is Eleanor Morgan, whose second book Hormonal: A Conversation About Women’s Bodies, Mental Health and Why We Need to Be Heard came out this year. It’s brilliant and beautifully written, combining Eleanor’s own experience with detailed research and interviews - a similar approach to the one taken in her first book, Anxiety for Beg…
 
Professor Sanchita Saxena shares insights on her new book on "Labor, Global Supply Chains, and the Garment Industry in South Asia".Key questions:- Why are garment wages so low in Bangladesh?- Why aren't wages improving?- What would enable higher wages?Buy the book: https://www.routledge.com/Labor-Global-Supply-Chains-and-the-Garment-Industry-in-Sou…
 
Naomi Shimada and Sarah Raphael have spent much of their adult lives working online. Sarah has been an editor at major digital titles including Refinery 29, where she was editor, then editor at large. Naomi, meanwhile, is a model and activist, with tens of thousands of followers on Instagram. But what has spending so much time online done to them -…
 
Dawn O’Porter is brilliant. Not only has she fronted smart, thought-provoking documentaries, but she is also an author, including of the Sunday Times bestseller, The Cows. Now she has followed it up with So Lucky, a funny, honest, story of three women - and the gulf between how we present ourselves on social media and how life really is. I loved ta…
 
It's that time of year... party season is almost upon us and with it the social pressure it brings. As a closet introvert, I have had my fair share of party-fear. So it was a total delight to talk to Jessica Pan about her hilarious book Sorry I'm Late, I Didn't Want to Come: An Introvert’s Year of Living Dangerously. She does all kinds of quirky th…
 
Professor Kathryn Sikkink (at the Harvard Kennedy School) argues that human rights laws, institutions, and movements are both legitimate and effective.We discuss whether human rights are western imperialism; whether rights movements help improve conditions for the masses; and what we still don't know about norm dynamics, but desperately need to fin…
 
Professor Daron Acemoglu discusses his new book, arguing that liberty and prosperity require strong states and strong societies. Alice asks where do strong societies come from? What explains the global heterogeneity in social capital, as well as labour coercion? Can his theory accommodate East Asia? And whether the state-society binary is really th…
 
Flo Perry is a writer and illustrator, whose recently released book How To Have Feminist Sex uses both of those skills. The result is funny, acerbic and smart - a taboo-busting guide that tackles everything from pubic hair to consent. I loved chatting to her about body image, having the confidence to be funny, what it is like growing up with famous…
 
Professor Branko Milanovic, world-leading expert on income inequality, discusses his fascinating new book. We discuss:- Was communism necessary for indigenous capitalism?- How can we tackle rising inequality?- How to respond to the xenophobic backlash? &- Isn't climate breakdown exacerbating global inequality.For more details on the book: https://w…
 
Chelsea Kwakye is impressive - seriously impressive. A history graduate from Homerton College, Cambridge, she was the only black girl in her year group of around 200 people studying the subject. The experience prompted her to write Taking Up Space with her best friend Ore Ogunbiyi, which went on to become the first book published by Stormzy’s impri…
 
My guest this week is Laura Jane Williams, who has just published her third book, and first novel, Our Stop, a hugely fun Sliding Doors-style romantic comedy about almost missing the love of your life. She’s also written a memoir, Becoming, exploring her twenty-something heartbreak and subsequent journey of self discovery, and Ice Cream for Breakfa…
 
My guest this week is Marie Le Conte. Marie grew up in France then moved to the UK in 2009 to study journalism. As a political journalist she has written for the likes of The New Statesman, the Sunday Times, the Evening Standard and Buzzfeed and is a regular talking head on television. Last year she was named one of Forbes Europe’s 30 Under 30. Now…
 
My guest this week is none other than Emma Barnett, broadcaster, journalist and author of Period. It’s About Bloody Time. I’ve known Emma since she was an editor at the Telegraph, where she launched the phenomenally successful Wonder Women digital section. Since then she has established herself as one of the country’s foremost broadcasters thanks t…
 
My guest this week is none other than Jessie Burton, the best-selling author of The Miniaturist (which became a BBC miniseries starring Anya Taylor-Joy) and The Muse (which was published in a staggering 38 languages). She has also published a children’s book, The Restless Girls, and now she’s back with her new novel for adults, The Confession, a gr…
 
My guest this week is Hannah Ewens, a writer and editor at VICE who specialises in writing about youth culture, mental health, music and film - and who has recently published her first book, Fangirls: Scenes From Modern Music Culture. It’s a fascinating examination of fan culture and how that shapes both individuals but also broader pop culture. Ha…
 
I’ve known Lotte for five years - she was once my editor at ES magazine and I’ve watched in awe as she has achieved ever greater things, becoming Deputy Editor and then Acting Editor in Chief of ELLE, winning awards for her writing, moving into advertising, and then publishing her first book, How to be a Gentlewoman: The Art of Soft Power in Hard T…
 
Poor rural Indians come to expect and demand more of the state if they observe other people like them successfully mobilising for better services and public goods. Through quantitative and qualitative research in Rajasthan, Dr Gabi Kruks-Wisner shows feedback loops in observations, expectations, and claims-making. Read more about her work: https://…
 
My guests this week are Elizabeth Uviebinené and Yomi Adegoke, authors of the phenomenal Slay In Your Lane: The Black Girl Bible. Recently-released in paperback, Slay In Your Lane is absolutely essential reading. It celebrates the ways in which black women are making waves - while also highlighting the uncomfortable truth that we live in a society …
 
Do people in developing countries prioritise the economy or the environment? To find out, Dr Quynh Nguyen & Dr Eddy Malesky undertook a nationally representative survey in Vietnam, asking people which kinds of firms they preferred. Their results may surprise you.You can read the full paper here: https://convention2.allacademic.com/one/apsa/apsa19/i…
 
It's a coup! Ken Opalo and Dan Honig - Assistant Professors of International Development - have seized my podcast!They discuss brilliant new work by Dr George Kwaku Ofosu, Postdoctoral Research Associate at Washington University in St Louis: "Do Fairer Elections Increase the Responsiveness of Politicians?", forthcoming in the American Political Sci…
 
"You need to mentally inhabit the world of each hypothesis. Then, you need to ask whether new evidence makes the hypothesis more or less likely".In this podcast, Dr Tasha Fairfield (Associate Professor at the LSE) explains how to do Bayesian process-tracing. We consider a cookie heist and state capacity in Peru!If you're keen to learn more, read:ht…
 
Why have wealthy countries increasingly opened their borders to international trade, but not immigrants?Dr Maggie Peters (Associate Professor at UCLA) suggests that trade openness has enabled firms to offshore production to cheap labour locations. This has reduced their incentive to lobby for low-skilled immigration back home. Without strong busine…
 
Warning: there is a LOT of laughter in this episode. Sophia Money-Coutts is a journalist, columnist and the author of two hilarious novels, The Plus One and What Happens Now. I love Sophia’s writing – she is so, so funny but also so clever and observant, with a brilliant knack for taking a sideways look at everyday scenarios and making you think tw…
 
My guest this week is Juno Dawson, the bestselling novelist, screenwriter, and columnist. Juno has won acclaim for her young adult novels, which include her debut, Hollow Pike and last year’s hit Clean about a young woman struggling with addiction. Her most recent book, Meat Market, tells the story of a young woman who goes into the modelling indus…
 
My guest this week is Rachel DeLoache Williams, whose recently-released book My Friend Anna: the True Story of the Fake Heiress of New York City, offers a riveting account of her friendship with Anna Sorokin. Anna, also known as the “Soho grifter,” was originally from Russia but posed as a German heiress who wanted to open a private club and spent …
 
My guest this week is the food writer Olivia Potts. Olivia spent five years working as a criminal barrister before giving it all up to train as a party chef. Her recently released memoir, A Half-Baked Idea: How Grief, Love and Cake Took Me from the Courtroom to Le Cordon Bleu, is an incredibly moving and beautifully-written account of coping with g…
 
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