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Learn how to systematically and consistently create profound innovation. Break through traditional thinking! Scott Amyx is a globally renowned expert in product innovation that integrates exponential technologies, out-of-the-box thinking and proven science and research methodologies to create breakthrough new innovations for organizations. On his Forbes column and now on this podcast, he shares research-based best practices on how to generate profound, new-to-the-world innovations that have ...
 
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More on Parfit's Reasons and Persons (1984), ch. 10-13. In this preview, we consider how Parfit deals with Bernard Williams' materialist thought experiment to show that the whole concept of personal identity doesn't make sense. Also, split brains! To hear this second part, you'll need to go sign up at partiallyexaminedlife.com/support. The post PRE…
 
What's the post-COVID future of movie theaters? Mark, Erica, and Brian compare past moviegoing habits and reflect on the big-screen vs. small-screen decision. How would we optimize the theatrical experience? We consider films affected like Tenet, Soul, etc. For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode at patreon.com/pretty…
 
On Reasons and Persons (1984), ch. 10-13. What makes a person persist over time? After using various sci-fi examples to test the Lockean (personhood=psychological continuity), physicalist (same brain=same person), and Cartesian (same soul=same person) theories, Parfit concludes that the whole notion is incoherent and isn't actually what we care abo…
 
Pull up a chair and join Drake, Robin, and Kathy at the table so we can enjoy a wonderful meal while we’re regaled with extraordinary stories from different walks of life, and stick around for dessert with a very delectable bonus question. Theme Music by Christopher and Adelaide Breen Edited by Dear Podcast Incomparable Memberships!: Sign up, help …
 
Returning heroine Vi (now a grad student in comics history) joins Erica, Mark, and Brian to put the new film in context, bringing in the weird ideas of WW's creator as shown in the 2017 biopic Professor Marston and the Wonder Women. Do the new film's themes actually make sense? We talk political ideals, truth, love, feminist utopias, '70s TV, and m…
 
One last take on John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1689), covering Book II, ch. 21 and 28. What makes a moral claim true? Do we have free will? What makes us choose the good, or not? In this coda to our long treatment of Locke's opus, we bring together all he has to say about morality, which is strangely modern yet also just strang…
 
Join our awesome guides Joelle, Loralyn, and Kathy at the intersection of liberal arts and technology. This podcasting, storytelling, and women-in-tech startup culture extravaganza is paired with a very spooky bonus question to welcome 2021. Theme Music by Christopher and Adelaide Breen Edited by Dear Podcast Incomparable Memberships!: Sign up, hel…
 
Is suffering’s “human position” something that can be redeemed? Wes and Erin discuss Auden’s poem Musée des Beaux Arts. The post (sub)Text: The “Human Position” of Suffering in W.H. Auden’s “Musée des Beaux Arts” first appeared on The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast.By Wes Alwan
 
What explains the immense quarantine-time popularity of this quaint reality cooking show? What do we get out of watching talented amateurs bake things? Stephen, famous for playing Scar in The Lion King on Broadway, joins Erica, Brian, and Mark to consdier the format, context, and appeal of the show. For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus con…
 
More on Book II (ch. 22-33) of John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding. On relations, then personal identity, with more on substances (spiritual and material), the various ways in which ideas can go wrong, and how mental association can entrench irrationality that disrupts clear thinking. Listen to part one first, or get the unbroken, ad-…
 
What has the Internet done to comedy? Tiffany, purveyor of social media bits and song parodies, joins Erica, Mark, and Brian to think about new ways of making and consuming comedy over TikTok, Instagram, YouTube, and other social media. Maybe given current events we should describe the goal as something other than "going viral"? For more, visit pre…
 
On Book II (ch. 22-33) of John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1689). Simple ideas get complex quickly when you put them into words, and can give rise to various philosophical problems that are either easily cleared up when you figure out how the complex idea is built out of simple ideas, or if they can't be so broken down, then we re…
 
What makes a film transcendently bad? A cult classic, as opposed to merely unwatchable? Child Jackey appeared in 1966's Manos: The Hands of Fate, and she joins Mark, Erica, and Brian to discuss growing up in community theater, being reintroduced to her family movie by MST3K, and the over-confident auteur. We also touch on Birdemic, Catwoman, The Ha…
 
A 2011 episode on John Locke's Second Treatise on Government (1690), with a fresh introduction connecting it to the present. What makes political power legitimate? Like Hobbes, Locke thought that things are less than ideal without a society to keep people from killing us, so we implicitly sign a social contract giving power to the state. But on Loc…
 
Cats, dogs, dragons, true crime, Australia, Hong Kong, and real love - find a veritable cornucopia of options, experiences, and stories all here in this special episode of Friends In Your Ears. Let Jules, Kate, and Kathy take you away in this magic carpet ride of an episode! Theme Music by Christopher and Adelaide Breen Edited by Dear Podcast Incom…
 
Fred writes for Marvel and his own Evil Twin Comics, in both non-fiction (e.g. Comic Book History of Animation, Action Philosophers) and stories (e.g. Marvel Zombies, Cowboys vs. Aliens). He even wrote a play about Jack Kirby. He joins Mark, Erica, and Brian to discuss playing in the Marvel sandbox, the role of humor, comic-to-movie transitions, an…
 
Continuing on Book II (through ch. 20) of John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1689). How do we acquire our ideas of pain and pleasure, duration and motion? We talk primary (shape, size) and secondary (color, sound) qualities, the former of which are supposed to be actually in objects, and the latter just in our mind. Plus, is Locke r…
 
Hedda Gabler is not a fan of specialization: not in the professor she has married, and his esoteric scholarly interests; not in domesticity, and the specialized affections required by marriage and motherhood; not in any lover’s infatuated specialization in her; and perhaps not in the form of specialization arguably required by life itself, with its…
 
Tyler (PEL and PMP's audio editor) rejoins Mark, Erica, and Brian to explain one of his passions. How is it a battle and what are the rules? What's the appeal? How does it relate to free-stylin', rap albums, and insult comedy? Does it make sense as a "free speech zone"? For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode at patre…
 
On the first half of Book II of John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1689). How do we get our ideas? Simple ideas must come in through perception, but this doesn't just mean the senses; also reflection on our own minds, and this added layer of complexity allows us to bring in memory, concepts, time, and more. Don't wait for part two; …
 
Join Mo and Scott into the depths of research and talk radio, and help us elucidate the limits of the structure of the podcast format, and stick around, It’s party time in the FIYE Bonus. Theme Music by Christopher and Adelaide Breen Edited by Dear Podcast Incomparable Memberships!: Sign up, help support this show, and get some fun bonus material. …
 
Kevin (The State, RISK!) joins Mark, Erica, and Brian to talk about his telling/curation/coaching of confessional stories. Do they have to be funny? True? How does this form relate to essays a la David Sedaris? How personal is too personal (or indicative of PTSD or something)? What's the role of craft in this most populist endeavor? Listen at risk-…
 
Continuing on Book I of John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1689). We consider Locke's arguments that since there are no universally agreed upon principles, therefore there are no beliefs that we're all born with, or that we all (without the need for experience) immediately recognize as true as soon as we gain the use of reason or ar…
 
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