Best nanotech podcasts we could find (Updated June 2018)
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Science Talk
Monthly
 
Science Talk is a weekly science audio show covering the latest in the world of science and technology. Join Steve Mirsky each week as he explores cutting-edge breakthroughs and controversial issues with leading scientists and journalists. He is also an articles editor and columnist at Scientific American magazine. His column, "Antigravity," is one of science writing's great humor venues. Also check our daily podcast from Scientific American : "60-Second Science." To view all of our archived ...
 
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Science Talk
Monthly+
 
Science Talk is a weekly science audio show covering the latest in the world of science and technology. Join Steve Mirsky each week as he explores cutting-edge breakthroughs and controversial issues with leading scientists and journalists. He is also an articles editor and columnist at Scientific American magazine and his column, "Antigravity", is one of science writing's rate venues for humor. Check our the new daily podcast from Scientific American: "60-Second Science." To view all of our ...
 
Dr. Kiki's Science Hour is an in-depth exploration of scientific topics ranging from climate change to nanotech. Every week neurophysiologist Dr. Kirsten Sanford talks with leading experts in all areas of scientific research.Although the show is no longer in production, you can enjoy episodes from the TWiT Archives.
 
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BookLab
Rare
 
From neurons to nanotech and from quarks to the cosmos, BookLab is the podcast that puts science books under the microscope! Join hosts Dan Falk and Amanda Gefter for a look at the latest in popular science writing: what’s new, what’s hot, and what you ought to be reading right now.
 
Dr. Kiki's Science Hour is an in-depth exploration of scientific topics ranging from climate change to nanotech. Every week neurophysiologist Dr. Kirsten Sanford talks with leading experts in all areas of scientific research.Although the show is no longer in production, you can enjoy episodes from the TWiT Archives.
 
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At the second Science on the Hill event, AI, Robotics and Your Health, experts from academia and the private sector talked with Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina about the future of AI and robotics in medicine.
 
Featured Book:The Strange Order of Things, by Antonio Damasio How did emotions and feelings – and conscious awareness in general – come into existence? Neuroscientist and philosopher Antonio Damasio weighs in. And on the nightstand: Internal Time, by Till Roenneberg; and The Last Man Who Knew Everything, by David Schwartz.…
 
Edinburgh University paleontologist Steve Brusatte talks about his May 2018 Scientific American article, "The Unlikely Triumph of the Dinosaurs," and his new book, The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs: A New History of a Lost World .
 
Brown University biologist and author Ken Miller talks about his new book The Human Instinct: How We Evolved to Have Reason, Consciousness and Free Will .
 
Stephen Hawking’s first book aimed at a popular audience, A Brief History of Time, became a surprise bestseller and turned the world of popular science writing upside down. We look back at this remarkable book, 30 years after its publication.
 
Michael Lemonick, opinion editor at Scientific American , talks about his most recent book, The Perpetual Now: A Story of Amnesia, Memory and Love , about Lonni Sue Johnson, who suffered a specific kind of brain damage that robbed her of much of her memory and her ability to form new memories, and what she has revealed to neuroscientists about ...…
 
Freelance science journalist Kevin Begos reports from the U.S. Power and Renewable Summit in Austin, Texas, on the use of blockchain technology to make more efficient energy markets and distribution.
 
David N. Schwartz talks about his latest book, The Last Man Who Knew Everything: The Life and Times of Enrico Fermi, Father of the Nuclear Age .
 
Featured Book: Life 3.0, by Max Tegmark Artificial intelligence is set to change the world. Will humanity have what it takes to survive, in the age of intelligent machines? And on the nightstand: Prehension, by Colin McGinn; and The Social Conquest of Earth by E.O. Wilson.
 
At the first Science Meets Congress event, Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future, energy and innovation experts from academia, government and the private sector talked with Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina about American's energy future.
 
Biochemist Sylvia Tara talks about her book The Secret Life of Fat: The Science behind the Body's Least-Understood Organ and What It Means for You .
 
Journalist Erik Vance talks about his first book, Suggestible You: The Curious Science of Your Brain’s Ability to Deceive, Transform and Heal .
 
Caleb Scharf, director of Columbia University’s Astrobiology Center talks about his latest book, The Zoomable Universe: An Epic Tour through Cosmic Scale, from Almost Everything to Almost Nothing, and the OSIRIS-REx space mission.
 
Stephen Asma, professor of philosophy at Columbia College Chicago and author of On Monsters: An Unnatural History of Our Worst Fears, talks about our enduring fascination with monsters.
 
Award-winning journalist Maryn McKenna talks about her latest book, Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats . (Part 2 of 2)
 
Award-winning journalist Maryn McKenna talks about her latest book, Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats . (Part 1 of 2)
 
The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded jointly to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson for developing cryo-electron microscopy that can determine high-resolution structures of biomolecules in solution.
 
The Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded today to Rainer Weiss, Barry Barish and Kip Thorne for their contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves.
 
Featured Book: The Big Picture, by Sean Carroll. Do our lives have any significance in a universe of impersonal particles and forces and physical laws? That’s a big question – but a physicist with an eye on the big picture takes a shot at answering them. And on the nightstand: You Belong to the Universe, by Jonathon Keats; and Time Travel, by J ...…
 
Featured Book: The Gene, by Siddhartha Mukherjee. The gene shapes who we are. While the science of genetics is still fairly young, it’s advancing at a breakneck speed. What will we do with this new knowledge? And on the nightstand: Surfing Uncertainty, by Andy Clark; and Black Hole Blues, by Janna Levin.…
 
Featured Book: Spooky Action at a Distance, by George Musser. Quantum entanglement is one of the strangest ideas in modern physics – and could end up changing the way we think about space and time. And on the nightstand: Why Information Grows, by César Hidalgo; and Inventology, by Pagan Kennedy.
 
Featured Book: Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs, by Lisa Randall. A physicist puts forward a bold idea about how the dinosaurs met their demise – and the role that an exotic kind of matter may have played. And on the nightstand: The Brain, by David Eagleman; and Seven Brief Lessons on Physics by Carlo Rovelli.…
 
Featured Books: Ada’s Algorithm, by James Essinger; and It Began with Babbage, by Subrata Dasgupta. Two new books look at the history of the computer – the invention that would usher in the modern age.
 
Two new books look at the history of our species, the rise of science, and how one puny primate conquered the planet: The Upright Thinkers, by Leonard Mlodinov; and Sapiens, by Yuval Noah Harari.
 
Featured Book: The Patient Will See You Now, by Eric Topol. Eric Topol says medicine itself has been sick for years – but he’s confident that we can use digital technology to improve the health care system. And on the nightstand: On the Move, by Oliver Sacks; and The Clockwork Universe, by Edward Dolnick.…
 
Featured Book: Mind Change, by Susan Greenfield. Digital technology is all around us, and there’s more of it every day. It’s changing the way we live our lives – and neuroscientist Susan Greenfield says it’s also affecting our brains. And on the nightstand: Invisible, by Philip Ball; and Unflattening, by Nick Sousanis.…
 
Featured Book: The Island of Knowledge, by Marcelo Gleiser. Are there limits to what science can discover? Marcelo Gleiser says that no matter how far science progresses, there’s always something that’s unknowable. And on the nightstand: Orfeo, by Richard Powers; and Why Does the World Exist? By Jim Holt.…
 
Featured Book: The Human Age, by Diane Ackerman. Human beings have completely transformed the planet, and even greater changes lie ahead. According to Diane Ackerman, we must now harness human creativity and create the world we want to live in. And on the nightstand: The Moral Landscape, by Sam Harris; and Eureka! By Chad Orzel.…
 
Featured Book: Superintelligence, by Nick Bostrom. Within a few decades, our computers could be smarter than we are. According to Nick Bostrom, we should be afraid of where Artificial Intelligence may lead us. And on the nightstand: Our Final Hour, by Martin Rees; and Tubes, by Andrew Blum.
 
Featured Book: Colliding Worlds, by Arthur I. Miller. The art-science connection: Over the last 50 years, the world of modern art has been completely transformed, Arthur I. Miller argues, because of the influence that modern science has had on art and artists. And on the nightstand: Logicomix, by Apostolos Doxiadis and Christos Papadimitriou; a ...…
 
Featured Book: Consciousness and the Brain, by Stanislas Deheane. Stanislas Deheane tackles the problem of consciousness, and tells us how his own research is helping to explain how that three-and-a-half pound lump of squishy gray mater inside your head does what it does. And on the nightstand: Time Reborn, by Lee Smolin; and The Idea Factory, ...…
 
Featured Book: Our Mathematical Universe, by Max Tegmark. How many universes are there, anyway? Physicist Max Tegmark says there could be an infinite number of them, and he argues the case in his latest book. And on the nightstand: A Universe from Nothing, by Lawrence Krauss; and Me Myself and Why, by Jennifer Oullette.…
 
Alfred Russel Wallace biographer Peter Raby of the University of Cambridge talks about the great naturalist and co-creator of the theory of evolution by natural selection on the 100th anniversary of Wallace's death
 
Psychologist Jesse Bering talks about his latest book PERV: The Sexual Deviant in All of Us
 
The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel for applying both quantum and classical physics to develop computer models of chemical systems that show details of chemical reactions
 
The 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics goes to François Englert and Peter Higgs for the theory of how particles acquire mass, requiring the existence of the Higgs Boson, experimentally confirmed to exist in 2012
 
The 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine goes to James E. Rothman, Randy W. Schekman and Thomas C. Südhof for their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells
 
At the Learning in the Digital Age summit at Google's New York City offices, Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina talked with Alan Alda about communicating science to the general public
 
At the Learning in the Digital Age summit at Google's New York City offices, Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina talked with Science Friday host Ira Flatow about the "teachable moment in science and culture"
 
Science journalist, author and Nature editor Adam Rutherford talks about new book Creation: How Science Is Reinventing Life Itself, which looks at the science of the origin of life and at the emerging science of synthetic biology
 
Mathematician John Mighton talks with Scientific American MIND editor Ingrid Wickelgren about getting math-shy kids interested, via JUMP: Junior Undiscovered Math Prodigies
 
Science journalist, author and Nature editor Adam Rutherford talks about new book Creation: How Science Is Reinventing Life Itself, which looks at the science of the origin of life and at the emerging science of synthetic biology.Also check out the podcast interview with Nobel laureate Jack Szostak about his origin of life research. And the pod ...…
 
Nobel laureate Harry Kroto, who shared the 1996 chemistry prize, talks with Scientific American Executive Editor Fred Guterl at the recent Lindau Nobel Laureates Meeting, about the role of science in society
 
Jesse Bering talks about his 2012 book, Why Is the Penis Shaped Like That? (and Other Reflections on Being Human)
 
Bill Nye the Science Guy ponders Superman's tonsorial travails, and science education
 
NASA astronaut and medical doctor Michael Barratt spoke to schoolkids at the Family Science Days event at this year's meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston
 
Mary Roach talks about her new book Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal, which traces what she calls "the whole food chute."
 
Conservation biologist Kent Redford, recently of the Wildlife Conservation Society and now with Archipelago Consulting, talks about the issues facing the intersection of synthetic biology and conservation biology. He organized a conference that starts April 9th at Clare College in Cambridge, England, called “How will synthetic biology and conse ...…
 
Conservation biologist Kent Redford, recently of the Wildlife Conservation Society and now with Archipelago Consulting, talks about the issues facing the intersection of synthetic biology and conservation biology. He organized a conference that starts April 9th at Clare College in Cambridge, England, called “How will synthetic biology and conse ...…
 
Science writer Dennis Meredith talks about his new science fiction book The Rainbow Virus, in which a bioterror plot turns people all the colors of the rainbow and more
 
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