show episodes
 
Each week we bring you a new, in-depth exploration of the space where science and society collide. We’re committed to the idea that making an effort to understand the world around you though science and critical thinking can benefit everyone—and lead to better decisions. We want to find out what’s true, what’s left to discover, and why it all matters.
 
Oriental medicine was not developed in a laboratory. It does not advance through double-blind controlled studies, nor does it respond well to petri dish experimentation. Our medicine did not come from the statistical regression of randomized cohorts, but from the observation and treatment of individuals in their particular environment. It grows out of an embodied sense of understanding how life moves, unfolds, develops and declines. Medicine comes from continuous, thoughtful practice of what ...
 
A podcast from Sno-Isle Libraries for lifelong learners with inquiring minds. Check It Out! introduces the amazing people who work at, use and collaborate with the library district – and all of the services it offers to residents of Washington State’s Snohomish and Island counties.
 
What’s up everybody I’m your host Mr. Los. I work in the International transportation sector as a shipbroker for liquid transportation overseas. In this profession I give global market analysis, provide logistics and legal guidance for contract assessment and forward market broadcasting. In addition to the international business I am an MMA striking coach with about 20 years of martial arts experience having trained all over the world at the top academies in the world in multiple different s ...
 
Chai. It’s more than just a soothing warm drink for relaxing. It can be argued that the core of desi society is Chai. From Pakistan to Bangladesh, Nepal to Sri Lanka. They live for Chai. It starts the day, while ones evening cannot be finished before having it before the night is over. Hell, the British invaded India for this very reason. Nothing exemplifies south Asia like this hot cup of relaxation where some of the most captivating discussions take place that could change the world night ...
 
Conversations about curiosity in work and life. Broadcasting weekly on WERA-LP 96.7 FM, streaming at wera.fm Choose to be Curious is a show all about curiosity. We explore how curiosity contributes to everything from education and innovation to leadership and conflict resolution. S. Leonard Rubenstein, a writer and teacher, once described curiosity as “a willing, a proud, an eager confession of ignorance” – and that’s what I’m going for. We have a choice. Like eating well or exercise, we get ...
 
Wills Valley Community Church is about providing a safe place for anyone who doesn't feel comfortable in a traditional church. It's about having an open door policy to accept everyone-right where they are. It's about not having to look or dress a certain way or have it altogether before we walk through the doors of the church. We'd like to invite you to come visit us at Wills Valley Community Church. When you do, you'll experience 'so much more'...a warm welcome, worship that will help you c ...
 
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show series
 
For years, Alli Henry, now Director of Community Planning at Rosslyn BID, and I have been having conversations about place-making and community–building. The pandemic has put our theories to the test: How do we build a sense of belonging in a place when we can’t easily meet the neighbors? How does a place become “home” when many of the usual marker…
 
Chinese medicine has a treasure house of methods and treatment for women’s health. From the work of Sun Si Miao to modern day practitioners women’s health has been a key concern in our medicine. In this conversation with Genevieve Le Goff we explore the transformations of qi through the five phases and six confirmations as we discuss Fu Xing Jue an…
 
We talk to neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett about why the idea that you have a lizard brain and a rational brain is completely wrong, how you can fight against implicit biases by swamping your brain with new data, why your brain’s most important job isn’t actually to think or be rational, and about one time Carl Sagan was very wrong about how br…
 
CBD is a big deal these days. Is it really the panacea that is constantly being sold to us? How does this substance and cannabis in general fit in with our thinking in terms of Chinese medicine? How do we separate wishful thinking from fact, and how do we know what constitutes a reliable and pure product from those of inferior grade? In this conver…
 
This week we explore the implications of there being much more water on the moon than we previously thought; a new study that looked at the possibility that our brains have an underlying propensity to understand words; and a quick look at a paper about Tennessee bicycle crashes. Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See omnystudi…
 
Having seen thousands of crows roosting right nearby, how could I not do a show about these curious creatures that use tools, are self-aware and (be still, my heart!) appreciate analogies? And who better to talk with than Colleen and John Marzluff, corvid experts extraordinaire? Our theme music is by Sean Balick. “The Cast and Favor” by Bayou Birds…
 
Our western world hides death. We are taught to avoid it. Avoid thinking about, do everything medically possible to prolong life, and focus on “more time” without regard to more of “what.” In this conversation with Tamsin Grainger we look into how death is inextricably entangled with life. How we care constantly dying to one moment as we emerge int…
 
Our medicine teaches us that all things move through cycles of generation, flourishing, decline and disappearance. It’s the way qi moves through this world and so not a surprise that at some point there is an end to the practice that has sustained us and allowed us to help others along the way. In this conversation with Charlie Braverman we discuss…
 
A special drop of the first episode of the new season of Indre’s other podcast, Cadence—which is about what music can tell us about our minds. This new season explores how music influences us, and the first episode is all about politics. Indre talks to musicians, academics, and politicians to find out what role music plays in the political machine—…
 
Good cookware requires seasoning. A hearty stew takes heat and time. Good wine needs a few years; whiskey, that requires a decade or more. And to develop as a practitioner of Chinese medicine, that ripening can take a lifetime. In this conversation with Peter Mole we explore the dynamics of doubt and certainty, along with the role of intuition and …
 
Pop quiz: what were the last five articles you read from a news source? And how many of them had to do with science? Climate change, perhaps? The chase for a COVID vaccine? Migratory paths of the monarch butterfly?We depend, perhaps now more than ever, on the fierce curiosity of science journalists like Kim O'Connell. A celebration of all things sc…
 
Research when done well is an inquiry that can shift the foundation of your cognitive model. And that’s exactly what it is for. In this conversation with Brenda Le we both explore how TCM is seen in our Western Chinese medicine world, and how doing this research opened her up to aspects of medicine and practice that she did not previously see. List…
 
The pandemic has forced many of us into isolation, perhaps even solitude. In this lovely, contemplative conversation, poet David Keplinger reflects on the power and importance of the sacred pause -- and the curiosity it enables and empowers.Theme music by Sean Balick. “Hickory Interlude” by OneSuch Village, via Blue Dot Sessions.…
 
My initial introduction to moxibustion was the classic Chinese mugwort cigar. I hated it. But only because my lungs are the weak link in my chain of being. The smoke was intolerable. Japanese rice grain moxa, that was a whole other universe. It’s not that less is more, it’s that the focused and directed aspects of Japanese moxibustion invite a comp…
 
This week: new research on how climate change is affecting autumn wildfires; a study that attempts to use a biologically inspired and technically enhanced enzymatic solution to break down plastics, and a study showing that whether blue whales are foraging or migrating affects what time of day they sing songs. Support the show: https://www.patreon.c…
 
The medicines and martial arts of Asia have long considered the lower belly and back to be of significant importance in health, wellbeing and as a kind of seat of power and presence. In this conversation with long time practitioner Jeffrey Dann we explore the structural powerhouse of the Koshi, the dynamic lower abdomen with all it’s energetic and …
 
With so much coming at us, how are we to tell fact from fiction, truth from fabrication? The News Literacy Project has tips, tools and techniques to help. Ebonee Rice, VP for NLP's Educator Network, joins me to share the wealth and engage our curiosity in cultivating good information hygiene.Theme music by Sean Balick, “Three Stories”, by Skittle, …
 
Ethics is never a simple black and white calculation, but rather the inquiry into proper relationship in a world filled with variability. It’s about considering the relationship with self, other, and society. And it’s a way to check ourselves for blind spots and to consider how our actions affect others, as well as ourselves. In this conversation w…
 
Let’s meet the baseball nut who sticks up for the guys behind the plate that every baseball fan loves to hate. Yes, we’re talking about umpires. In this episode of the Check It Out! podcast, host Ken Harvey talks to his friend Jason Becker, creator of the Umpire Inspire podcast. “In my book, he’s a genius, and he’s producing a fascinating podcast f…
 
There is a kind of poetry to Chinese characters. They gives hints and clues about the names we give to the world. They tell a story. In this conversation with Elisabeth Rochat we explore, like you’d explore bottles of fine wine, some of the meaning and nuance in the characters 意 yi, 通 tong, 命 ming,and 理 li. There are some delicious surprises in thi…
 
Ayanna Spencer joins guest host Julie Williams-Reyes to explore protest as a radical form of curiosity and how that has unfolded in Ms. Spencer's journey to, and work with, Black feminist theory. This is the second in a collaborative series of interviews hosted by graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in the fall 2019 class Topics i…
 
This week we talk to Sara Hendren, an artist, writer, and professor at Olin College of Engineering about her new book What Can a Body Do?: How We Meet the Built World. Hendren's book explores the idea that perhaps many people are disabled not by the shape of their body or how they work, but instead by the shape of the built environment in which the…
 
Jing, Qi and Shen— the three treasures. Like so many of these pithy quotes about Chinese medicine there is a lot here if you have taken the time to investigate it and see how it fits within your experience of practicing medicine. In this conversation with Yair Maimon we touch on the three treasures as they relate to treating cancer with acupuncture…
 
This week: A deep look into new research on the relationship between how you sleep and the likelihood of developing Alzheimer’s disease, including an interview with the study’s author, Matt Walker, and two neuroscientists review Elon Musk’s recent Neuralink announcement and explain what they got right and what they got very wrong. Support the show:…
 
Chinese is not that easy, and the 文言文 (wen yan wen) the classical Chinese, that stuff is a whole other order of magnitude in challenge to the modern Western mind. And yet if we are going to practice this medicine with deep roots into a long gone time and culture, we need access to the stepping stones that have been handed down to us over centuries …
 
What’s a wanderer to do in a pandemic? How can we get away while we stay close to home? Where can we go when so much is closed? Demian Perry's passion project TownCalendar.org has answers. He makes the case for choosing to be curious about the places right around us... You need this conversation!Our theme music is by Sean Balick. “Lakeside Path" by…
 
We venerate the masters, hold them up as shining examples of what we would like to be one some day, but let’s be honest here— most of us will never be masters. Those rarified characters are few and far between. And the process it takes is not one most of us would willing sign up for. We do however have a good shot at being a fine journeyman or jour…
 
In Episode 62 of Sno-Isle Libraries Check It Out podcast, co-hosts Ken Harvey and Tricia Lee talk to local author Stewart Tolnay and learn how he has used his study of American racial history to create interesting fiction and nonfiction. Tolnay is a Ph.D. professor emeritus of sociology at the University of Washington. His first fiction novel, “Les…
 
Stems and Branches are old Chinese science. Our medicine touches on it, but most of us rely on the more modern perspectives for our clincal work. The Stems and Branches speak to a perspective of the universe and our place in it that is foreign to our minds not because of language and culture, but because we live a world that focus more on humanity …
 
Ryoko Reed founded Bringing Student Equity to Education Now (B-SEEN). She joins me this week for a timely and telling conversation about how we -- parents, teachers, the whole community -- might use curiosity to support equity in education. Theme music by Sean Balick. “Cirrus Transit" by CloudBreaker, via Blue Dot Sessions.…
 
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